Object #1011093 from MS-Papers-0032-0534

3 pages written 10 Dec 1868 by James Crowe Richmond to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - J C Richmond, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0534 (35 digitised items). 33 letters written from Wellington, Turanganui, Ngatapa, Napier and Nelson, 1865-1870, & undated. Includes letter from Richmond to Ormond, Oct 1868; McLean to Richmond, 7 Jan 1869. Also piece-level inventory.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

our native allies are tired for the present. Our system of continuous moving does not suit their ideas, which are in the direction of sudden short campaigns, or sitting down before the enemy when he is in sight. Thirdly, - Ngatikahungnnu have disagreed (to use a mild term), and our arrival probably checked a worse quarrel. Fourthly, - there must be on every side, a considerable European force to ensure effective cooperation by our native allies in the converging movement, and to bring it to a permanently successful issue. Fifthly, - the commissariat requires a very careful organisation, and some time must elapse before stores and working cattle, with other means of transport can be collected at Ohiwa, Wairoa, Turanga, and perhaps Taupo.

I shall not leave this till every arrangement is made to keep it in a state for defence, and communication. For this purpose I am trying to get the Land Question settled without delay. Pray see Tareha, and procure his co-operation. The district ought to be given over to us. We shall deal more than fairly with all who have kept out of this last trouble, including old Raharui, if the old worthy will trust and help us.

I propose to re-assemble the old Defence Force, and locate them, on condition of keeping a post. I propose another post of Ngatikahunga; and a third, of Ngatiporou, on the terms given to the Arawa at Ohiwa; or something like those terms.

We are going out directly to look for a house, and position to be

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English (ATL)

occupied by a small party of Constabulary, pending these permanent arrangements.

We shall turn all our means and attention without delay to the organisation of measures for the converging movement, before the summer is far advanced.

Ropata, Henare Tomoana, and Ihaka Whanga, are the men who have won most credit in this affair. Ihaka is the most lovable native I have met with, and I think the most reliable friend we have. Everybody feels confidence in him. I hope Karauria's brother and successor may be kept steady. Look after him. He is a fine youth, brave and unassuming. He will be talked to, and tempted a good deal on his return, and may get spoiled and dissipated.


Ever yours truly (Signed)
J.C. Richmond.

English (ATL)

COPY. Turanga

December 10th. 1868.



My dear McLean,

I have received your letter of the 8th. inst. I feel the weight of your observation that the present is the best moment for a blow. For many reasons it is so.

Kooti's people are, no doubt, dispirited, and want the means of war, and the weather is splendid. Nevertheless I am convinced that we must not divide our fighting army, and that the West Coast must be dealt with first. The trouble there disorganises a larger population and menaces a much larger amount of property than here. Kooti is not likely to stir after his reception here for at least some weeks; whilst Titoko is comparatively unchecked close to Whanganui and within easy march of Taranaki. Secondly, our native allies are tired for the present. Our system of continuous moving does not suit their ideas, which are in the direction of sudden short campaigns, or sitting down before the enemy when he is in sight. Thirdly, - Ngatikahungnnu have disagreed (to use a mild term), and our arrival probably checked a worse quarrel. Fourthly, - there must be on every side, a considerable European force to ensure effective cooperation by our native allies in the converging movement, and to bring it to a permanently successful issue. Fifthly, - the commissariat requires a very careful organisation, and some time must elapse before stores and working cattle, with other means of transport can be collected at Ohiwa, Wairoa, Turanga, and perhaps Taupo.

I shall not leave this till every arrangement is made to keep it in a state for defence, and communication. For this purpose I am trying to get the Land Question settled without delay. Pray see Tareha, and procure his co-operation. The district ought to be given over to us. We shall deal more than fairly with all who have kept out of this last trouble, including old Raharui, if the old worthy will trust and help us.

I propose to re-assemble the old Defence Force, and locate them, on condition of keeping a post. I propose another post of Ngatikahunga; and a third, of Ngatiporou, on the terms given to the Arawa at Ohiwa; or something like those terms.

We are going out directly to look for a house, and position to be occupied by a small party of Constabulary, pending these permanent arrangements.

We shall turn all our means and attention without delay to the organisation of measures for the converging movement, before the summer is far advanced.

Ropata, Henare Tomoana, and Ihaka Whanga, are the men who have won most credit in this affair. Ihaka is the most lovable native I have met with, and I think the most reliable friend we have. Everybody feels confidence in him. I hope Karauria's brother and successor may be kept steady. Look after him. He is a fine youth, brave and unassuming. He will be talked to, and tempted a good deal on his return, and may get spoiled and dissipated.


Ever yours truly (Signed)
J.C. Richmond.

Part of:
Inward letters - J C Richmond, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0534 (35 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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