Object #1010976 from MS-Papers-0032-0827

6 pages written 7 Oct 1851 by Susan Douglas McLean in Wellington to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0827 (34 digitised items). Letters between Donald McLean and Susan. Donald's letters written from Hawke's Bay, Rangitikei, Taita and Wairapapa. Susan's letters from Dalmuir Hill, Wellington (the home of her parents (Robert and Susannah Strang).

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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Page 1 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

Wellington Terrace
October 7th 1851


My dear husband

I had just finished dinner yesterday and had laid myself down on the chance of a rest as I was very tired having been out all day paying visits when I received your letter which at once put away all my fatigue. I was so happy darling to get it. I intended at once to write you a few lines in answer but Mrs Kirton came in and remained till 11 o'clock which was too late which made me very cross. You know that I dislike to be disturbed at night as it is the only time I can read for I have got a good deal to occupy my time during the day,

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English (MD)

what with returning my visits, going up to Mama and doing things about the house for her. I have plenty to do besides that. I have so much work which must be done before your return. Your slippers, antimaccassers, sheets, pillow cases, and I have no doubt there will be no end of mending when my old plague's things come from Whaganaui and Manawatu. I am really glad however that I have so much work as it prevents me thinking the time my own dear Donald is away so long. How much dearest I missed you on Sunday. I think I felt your absence more that day than any other since you have been away from me since you came back from the East Coast. When I get up in the morning I felt so dull at the thoughts of going to church without my dear husband. Papa came to take me. After dinner I went up to spend the day with Mama. I came back before I must according to your orders.

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English (MD)

The letter which I wrote to you on Friday last will be waiting for you at Ahuriri. I am delighted that I got it sent for I may not have an opportunity of sending another letter for a long time. Most likely not till the box goes up again. I had begun to despair of getting it down that he was not sure that the vessel was in Worsers Bay and the only chance would be to send some one out with the letter. Ben went out there on Sunday morning and fortunately the vessel had not gone. He met the Captain just going on board. It is really most wonderful how everything has been fortunate for us since our marriage. How often love we have observed it. I suppose you have seen "The model husband" by this time. I hope he is a little improved since he went up to Wairarapa. I think he should take my Donald for an example for I never could complain that you were not attentive. Indeed darling you have

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English (MD)

quite spoiled me. You are too indulgent and pet me too much. I trust however I shall repay your love by being through life a affectionate and dutiful wife. I feel that I never can do enough for you. I am glad to tell you that dear Mama seems to continue to improve. Her appetite is much better. I am very sorry that I could not get up to see her either yesterday or today. Mary Paul told me on Sunday that she would be up the next morning and I had sent to ask Miss Hart to go with me after 2 o'clock to pay visits so that I was engaged all day. Today the weather has been so bad that I could not go. The Clara has come in at last but I am so dreadfully disappointed for Mr Hervey has never had the civility to go to see my Uncle Edward, although he had received an invitation from him. It was really too bad, after all the business he has received from Papa and Mama but it only shows me now what he is. Papa is very

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English (MD)

angry about it. He said that he was only two hours in Glasgow but surely his time could not be so precious that he could not spend a day there. Papa says he could have gone down to my Uncle's in half an hour. I am so sorry for poor Mama for she had made up her mind that she would have letters by him. My cousin promised also to send a sketch of Kelvin Dale by him, and perhaps now there may never be an opportunity again. I am quite cross about [it]. Papa saw Mrs Hervey. He says she is no beauty. She is short and nearly as thin as Mrs Fox. Papa says that Mr Hervey is stouter than ever. How handsome he must be. I trust darling that it does not rain where you are as it is raining here tonight. It has been a most miserable day. I am sure however that you will not expose

English (MD)

Wellington Terrace
October 7th 1851


My dear husband

I had just finished dinner yesterday and had laid myself down on the chance of a rest as I was very tired having been out all day paying visits when I received your letter which at once put away all my fatigue. I was so happy darling to get it. I intended at once to write you a few lines in answer but Mrs Kirton came in and remained till 11 o'clock which was too late which made me very cross. You know that I dislike to be disturbed at night as it is the only time I can read for I have got a good deal to occupy my time during the day, what with returning my visits, going up to Mama and doing things about the house for her. I have plenty to do besides that. I have so much work which must be done before your return. Your slippers, antimaccassers, sheets, pillow cases, and I have no doubt there will be no end of mending when my old plague's things come from Whaganaui and Manawatu. I am really glad however that I have so much work as it prevents me thinking the time my own dear Donald is away so long. How much dearest I missed you on Sunday. I think I felt your absence more that day than any other since you have been away from me since you came back from the East Coast. When I get up in the morning I felt so dull at the thoughts of going to church without my dear husband. Papa came to take me. After dinner I went up to spend the day with Mama. I came back before I must according to your orders. The letter which I wrote to you on Friday last will be waiting for you at Ahuriri. I am delighted that I got it sent for I may not have an opportunity of sending another letter for a long time. Most likely not till the box goes up again. I had begun to despair of getting it down that he was not sure that the vessel was in Worsers Bay and the only chance would be to send some one out with the letter. Ben went out there on Sunday morning and fortunately the vessel had not gone. He met the Captain just going on board. It is really most wonderful how everything has been fortunate for us since our marriage. How often love we have observed it. I suppose you have seen "The model husband" by this time. I hope he is a little improved since he went up to Wairarapa. I think he should take my Donald for an example for I never could complain that you were not attentive. Indeed darling you have quite spoiled me. You are too indulgent and pet me too much. I trust however I shall repay your love by being through life a affectionate and dutiful wife. I feel that I never can do enough for you. I am glad to tell you that dear Mama seems to continue to improve. Her appetite is much better. I am very sorry that I could not get up to see her either yesterday or today. Mary Paul told me on Sunday that she would be up the next morning and I had sent to ask Miss Hart to go with me after 2 o'clock to pay visits so that I was engaged all day. Today the weather has been so bad that I could not go. The Clara has come in at last but I am so dreadfully disappointed for Mr Hervey has never had the civility to go to see my Uncle Edward, although he had received an invitation from him. It was really too bad, after all the business he has received from Papa and Mama but it only shows me now what he is. Papa is very angry about it. He said that he was only two hours in Glasgow but surely his time could not be so precious that he could not spend a day there. Papa says he could have gone down to my Uncle's in half an hour. I am so sorry for poor Mama for she had made up her mind that she would have letters by him. My cousin promised also to send a sketch of Kelvin Dale by him, and perhaps now there may never be an opportunity again. I am quite cross about [it]. Papa saw Mrs Hervey. He says she is no beauty. She is short and nearly as thin as Mrs Fox. Papa says that Mr Hervey is stouter than ever. How handsome he must be. I trust darling that it does not rain where you are as it is raining here tonight. It has been a most miserable day. I am sure however that you will not expose yourself to bad weather for you are too fond of your little slave to do that. You know how miserable she would be if you took rheumatism. I must however my own darling bid you good night. I had no idea of writing you such a long letter when I commenced but when I begin to write to you I cannot stop. I fear if you get a number from me as long as this by the first vessel that goes up you will get tired reading them. I do not think however you will get tired of your little slave's letters. God bless you my dearest husband and believe me to remain, ever your affectionate wife


Susan Douglas McLean

If you can get a mat for the kitchen floor I wish love that you would bring it.

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0827 (34 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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