Object #1010811 from MS-Papers-0032-0123

4 pages written 14 Jan 1846 by Walter Baldock Durrant Mantell to Sir Donald McLean in Wellington City

From: Papers relating to provincial affairs - Taranaki. Inspector of police, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0123 (71 digitised items). No Item Description

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Te Hua

14 Jan. 1846.



Sir,

I had the pleasure of personally informing you of my intention of making an excursion to the district of Ngatimaru and have now to inform you that having yesterday in company with Mr. Chas. Nairn proceeded to Waitara on my way thither, we have been compelled to return in consequence of the road to the interior having been tapued by the chieftains of Waitara.

The tapu of course originated in a dispute about a female - a woman named Coffin or Kawena having remained at Ngatimaru

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English (ATL)

when on her way from Wanganui in preference to proceeding to Mamaku whene resided a young native for whom she was destined. As however her brother who went to bring her back consented to the match the Waitara chiefs have dropped this cause of quarrel but have taued the three roads and talk of fighting because the brother above mentioned, Kaeapa, called Rawiri, a great chief of te Mamaku, ''upoko-poaka'' a name doubly irritating from its extreme appropriateness.

After a long and ridiculous debate, in which the chieftains took care to assert their independence of Her Majesty's authority and to draw parallels between Taunum and the chief Rawiri, they consented to allow us

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English (ATL)

to go if we would act as spies for them and attempt to bring back the woman, but as they this morning insisted on our going unguided by the Titirangi raod which we have been informed is circuitous and difficult instedd of that by Takopu and as another visit to another chieftain (Hakopa) and in all probability another long debate and more obstacles were necessary preliminaries to our departure even by the longer route we felt that our best course was to return.

I have only to add that the natives assert that their hearts are very dark and that unless some steps are soon taken to pacify them they fear that they may not be able to prevent themselves from making war on the Ngatimaru an event

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English (ATL)

which they feel confident will much surprise yourself and the Revd. Mr. Bolland and which in spite of our having been forewarned will no less surprise myself and my fellow traveller Mr. Charles Nairn.


I am Sir, Your obedient servant,
Walter B. Mantell.

English (ATL)

Te Hua

14 Jan. 1846.



Sir,

I had the pleasure of personally informing you of my intention of making an excursion to the district of Ngatimaru and have now to inform you that having yesterday in company with Mr. Chas. Nairn proceeded to Waitara on my way thither, we have been compelled to return in consequence of the road to the interior having been tapued by the chieftains of Waitara.

The tapu of course originated in a dispute about a female - a woman named Coffin or Kawena having remained at Ngatimaru when on her way from Wanganui in preference to proceeding to Mamaku whene resided a young native for whom she was destined. As however her brother who went to bring her back consented to the match the Waitara chiefs have dropped this cause of quarrel but have taued the three roads and talk of fighting because the brother above mentioned, Kaeapa, called Rawiri, a great chief of te Mamaku, ''upoko-poaka'' a name doubly irritating from its extreme appropriateness.

After a long and ridiculous debate, in which the chieftains took care to assert their independence of Her Majesty's authority and to draw parallels between Taunum and the chief Rawiri, they consented to allow us to go if we would act as spies for them and attempt to bring back the woman, but as they this morning insisted on our going unguided by the Titirangi raod which we have been informed is circuitous and difficult instedd of that by Takopu and as another visit to another chieftain (Hakopa) and in all probability another long debate and more obstacles were necessary preliminaries to our departure even by the longer route we felt that our best course was to return.

I have only to add that the natives assert that their hearts are very dark and that unless some steps are soon taken to pacify them they fear that they may not be able to prevent themselves from making war on the Ngatimaru an event which they feel confident will much surprise yourself and the Revd. Mr. Bolland and which in spite of our having been forewarned will no less surprise myself and my fellow traveller Mr. Charles Nairn.


I am Sir, Your obedient servant,
Walter B. Mantell.

Part of:
Papers relating to provincial affairs - Taranaki. Inspector of police, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0123 (71 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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