Object #1010695 from MS-Papers-0032-0217

4 pages written 26 Jan 1861 by Henry Tacy Clarke in Tauranga to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry Tacy Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0217 (61 digitised items). 59 letters written from Tauranga, Maketu, Auckland & Waimate, 1861-1870. Includes letter to Hare Reweti (Charles Davis) from Manuhiri with explanatory note on verso from Louis Hetet, 1870.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Tauranga

January 26th. 1861.



My dear Sir,

I wrote a letter on the 21st. just before I left for Maketu reporting a change of feeling on the part of some of the natives of this place. William Thompson has been here and altho he says that his desire is that all the Tauranga natives should remain quiet. It is rather remarkable that this determination to go to Taranaki has only arisen since he visited them. Since the date of the Public letter above referred to Rawiri Puhirake, who is very active in dissuading these infatuated people from going, has told me that several have given up the idea.

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English (ATL)

Next week I shall go and visit the most obstinate and I shall not leave a stone unturned to prevent any from going hence. William Thompson's conversation was very interesting, but there is one thing to be seen he will only let you have as much of his mind as he thinks proper however good his intentions may have been at the outset of the King movement he has evoked the restless spirit of his countrymen, they have overstepped the bounds he laid out for them and nothing is left for him but to go along with the steam. If he attempts to stem the torrent he will be swamped and lose all influence amongst the Waikatos.

He complained bitterly about Mr. Fenton he said that he instead

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English (ATL)

of healing the breech only widened it. I asked him if any of the English Magistrates visited them. He said yes, but he did not like them all - and then remarked about Mr. Fenton. He shows no disposition to visit the Governor - he is evidently afraid on account of the part the Waikato have taken in the Taranaki War. Some of his followers say that he does not forget Rauparaha. I believe it would be the means of overcoming many of his false ideas, and prejudices. I think no one can now deny that Wiremu Kingis quarrel and the King movement are very nearly allied.

If it could be managed I should like to take a run up to Auckland for the trip and return again in the vessel There are many things I wish to have a korero about and get your advice which cannot be managed

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English (ATL)

by writing especially as you are so busy just now.

I should also like to get the Governor's authority to visit the Kaha. Also to visit MataMata occasionally. The Natives at both places press my going and perhaps it would be well at this juncture.

I shall be glad to hear from you by return of the vessel if you can find time to write.


I remain Yours truly,
Henry T. vlarke.
Donald McLean.

English (ATL)

Tauranga

January 26th. 1861.



My dear Sir,

I wrote a letter on the 21st. just before I left for Maketu reporting a change of feeling on the part of some of the natives of this place. William Thompson has been here and altho he says that his desire is that all the Tauranga natives should remain quiet. It is rather remarkable that this determination to go to Taranaki has only arisen since he visited them. Since the date of the Public letter above referred to Rawiri Puhirake, who is very active in dissuading these infatuated people from going, has told me that several have given up the idea. Next week I shall go and visit the most obstinate and I shall not leave a stone unturned to prevent any from going hence. William Thompson's conversation was very interesting, but there is one thing to be seen he will only let you have as much of his mind as he thinks proper however good his intentions may have been at the outset of the King movement he has evoked the restless spirit of his countrymen, they have overstepped the bounds he laid out for them and nothing is left for him but to go along with the steam. If he attempts to stem the torrent he will be swamped and lose all influence amongst the Waikatos.

He complained bitterly about Mr. Fenton he said that he instead of healing the breech only widened it. I asked him if any of the English Magistrates visited them. He said yes, but he did not like them all - and then remarked about Mr. Fenton. He shows no disposition to visit the Governor - he is evidently afraid on account of the part the Waikato have taken in the Taranaki War. Some of his followers say that he does not forget Rauparaha. I believe it would be the means of overcoming many of his false ideas, and prejudices. I think no one can now deny that Wiremu Kingis quarrel and the King movement are very nearly allied.

If it could be managed I should like to take a run up to Auckland for the trip and return again in the vessel There are many things I wish to have a korero about and get your advice which cannot be managed by writing especially as you are so busy just now.

I should also like to get the Governor's authority to visit the Kaha. Also to visit MataMata occasionally. The Natives at both places press my going and perhaps it would be well at this juncture.

I shall be glad to hear from you by return of the vessel if you can find time to write.


I remain Yours truly,
Henry T. vlarke.
Donald McLean.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Tacy Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0217 (61 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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