Object #1010686 from MS-Papers-0032-0484

4 pages written 17 Jan 1870 by John Davies Ormond in Napier City to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - J D Ormond, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0484 (67 digitised items). 65 letters written from Napier. Includes copy of letter from Te Poihipi Tukairangi, Pahautea Kaingaroa (in Maori), 14 May 1870; letter from Te Moananui to Hamana Tiakiwai, Napier, 3 Apr 1870.Also letter from Ormond to Daniel Pollen; Ormond to Lieut Col James Fraser, 3 Dec 1869; Lieut Col James Fraser to Capt Reuner, 4 Dec 1869.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Napier,

Jan. 17th., 1870.



Dear McLean,

I have written you at length about Taupo and Patatere and need not say more on that subject. There are few other subjects I have made notes to write you about. Who manages the Southern Cross? I thought Vogel had the direction of it -- why I ask is, that a man named Hornsby (I think) the reporter for that paper, sent by the Wellington a letter to be used for telegraphing south by Ward in which he described you as thoroughly humbugged by the King party and so on. I stopped the Telegram but these things are mischievous and shd. be better managed. -- Kinross asked me to mention to you that he does not think your land matters are being looked after properly -- is it Hamlin or Locke -- or what wants doing -- I will keep them looked after if you tell me what there is to do -- Respecting the Big Bush land Tareha could not sell you Karauria's share, the Court has to appoint a successor to Karauria -

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English (ATL)

- The Nelsons have been trying to deal with Williams for the flax on the Bush section and offered I think full value for it. I would recommend you to sell the flax in preference to having anything to do with a Mill there is not flax enough on either your land or Nelsons to work a Mill thoroughly -- whereas both wd. keep one Mill going.

Tylee is going to Auckland when the Troops go can you do anything for him -- I asked Gisborne to give him Grindells offices when he was dismissed but they had been given to a man called Hare who is exactly the same class as Grindell only much more of a blackguard. I wd. like to help Tylee if possible he is a decent respectable fellow and has a nice family -- What are you going to do about Poverty Bay and Wairoa command Branigan talked of sending Mr. Pitt an Inspector in Constabulary there I hear he is a young fellow quite new to everything -- if so he wd. not be suitable at all for places like these -- Westrup has given me satisfaction since I have had anything to do with, him and knows the Natives and I think it a pity to interfere with a man when he suits --

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English (ATL)


I wrote you before about Constabulary arrangements and I see so much going wrong that I must write again. The whole force of tried men will disappear if you do not mind what you are about. It appears there is a regulation under which any Constabulary man can give 3 months notice and leave and I hear from the officers that the men are giving notice in large numbers and that the men who are going are their best men -- This regulation works also in this way -- if a man is found fault with, he gives notice at once. The result of this is that the good officers are losing all interest in their work and there is no doubt the whole concern is going to the bad -- I have made enquiry as to Whitmore's statement respecting men being taken on under the new system who had been turned out under the old and find that altho he made the most of it yet there is some truth in it. However I do not want to meddle with the Constabulary further than to urge you to see into the points I have named -- it is a serious thing to know that we are losing many of the few trained men we have and we have seen before the difficulty of replacing them at short notice. Depend upon it you must have the two separate -- the fighting force must be distinct from the peeler and the sooner you have it understood the better. The whole thing

Page 4 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

as at present managed is an anomaly -- The Chief of the Police is trying to get them all into his own hands -- The men are employed on service he is certainly not qualified to direct -- for he is not the man for instance to send to do McDonnells work if for nothing else than that he does not understand and under-rates Natives -- and so the whole concern is being pulled first this way and then that -- I see the mischief that is being done and think it a very serious matter -- About McDonnell wishing to give up the Taupo command, he does not wish to do so until Te Kooti's business is settled -- all he has said to me has been let me go as soon as the work here is done. Roberts the man I have here in command is a very good man I think but I have had no chance yet of judging what he is under difficulties -- he is in great dismay at the state the force is getting into.

I do not think of anything else to write about. Has nothing turned up for Green I shd. be glad if you could provide for him, there is only work for one man between my two offices and I detest idle people about me.

Locke is at Taupo and will remain there for the present. I must now close and I find the mail is about closing.

Always,
Yours very truly,
J. D. Ormond.

English (ATL)

Napier,

Jan. 17th., 1870.



Dear McLean,

I have written you at length about Taupo and Patatere and need not say more on that subject. There are few other subjects I have made notes to write you about. Who manages the Southern Cross? I thought Vogel had the direction of it -- why I ask is, that a man named Hornsby (I think) the reporter for that paper, sent by the Wellington a letter to be used for telegraphing south by Ward in which he described you as thoroughly humbugged by the King party and so on. I stopped the Telegram but these things are mischievous and shd. be better managed. -- Kinross asked me to mention to you that he does not think your land matters are being looked after properly -- is it Hamlin or Locke -- or what wants doing -- I will keep them looked after if you tell me what there is to do -- Respecting the Big Bush land Tareha could not sell you Karauria's share, the Court has to appoint a successor to Karauria -- The Nelsons have been trying to deal with Williams for the flax on the Bush section and offered I think full value for it. I would recommend you to sell the flax in preference to having anything to do with a Mill there is not flax enough on either your land or Nelsons to work a Mill thoroughly -- whereas both wd. keep one Mill going.

Tylee is going to Auckland when the Troops go can you do anything for him -- I asked Gisborne to give him Grindells offices when he was dismissed but they had been given to a man called Hare who is exactly the same class as Grindell only much more of a blackguard. I wd. like to help Tylee if possible he is a decent respectable fellow and has a nice family -- What are you going to do about Poverty Bay and Wairoa command Branigan talked of sending Mr. Pitt an Inspector in Constabulary there I hear he is a young fellow quite new to everything -- if so he wd. not be suitable at all for places like these -- Westrup has given me satisfaction since I have had anything to do with, him and knows the Natives and I think it a pity to interfere with a man when he suits --

I wrote you before about Constabulary arrangements and I see so much going wrong that I must write again. The whole force of tried men will disappear if you do not mind what you are about. It appears there is a regulation under which any Constabulary man can give 3 months notice and leave and I hear from the officers that the men are giving notice in large numbers and that the men who are going are their best men -- This regulation works also in this way -- if a man is found fault with, he gives notice at once. The result of this is that the good officers are losing all interest in their work and there is no doubt the whole concern is going to the bad -- I have made enquiry as to Whitmore's statement respecting men being taken on under the new system who had been turned out under the old and find that altho he made the most of it yet there is some truth in it. However I do not want to meddle with the Constabulary further than to urge you to see into the points I have named -- it is a serious thing to know that we are losing many of the few trained men we have and we have seen before the difficulty of replacing them at short notice. Depend upon it you must have the two separate -- the fighting force must be distinct from the peeler and the sooner you have it understood the better. The whole thing as at present managed is an anomaly -- The Chief of the Police is trying to get them all into his own hands -- The men are employed on service he is certainly not qualified to direct -- for he is not the man for instance to send to do McDonnells work if for nothing else than that he does not understand and under-rates Natives -- and so the whole concern is being pulled first this way and then that -- I see the mischief that is being done and think it a very serious matter -- About McDonnell wishing to give up the Taupo command, he does not wish to do so until Te Kooti's business is settled -- all he has said to me has been let me go as soon as the work here is done. Roberts the man I have here in command is a very good man I think but I have had no chance yet of judging what he is under difficulties -- he is in great dismay at the state the force is getting into.

I do not think of anything else to write about. Has nothing turned up for Green I shd. be glad if you could provide for him, there is only work for one man between my two offices and I detest idle people about me.

Locke is at Taupo and will remain there for the present. I must now close and I find the mail is about closing.

Always,
Yours very truly,
J. D. Ormond.

Part of:
Inward letters - J D Ormond, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0484 (67 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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