Object #1010427 from MS-Papers-0032-0811

8 pages written 24 Nov 1862 by Annabella McLean to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Catherine Hart (sister); Catherine Isabella McLean (sister-in-law), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0811 (71 digitised items). Catherine McLean (later Hart) wrote from Stobs Castle, Hawick, Roxburghshire and from Edinburgh, Scotland prior to her arrival in New Zealand in 1861, and from Wellington, Hawke's Bay and Christchurch, 1861-1875, including many undated letters and fragments. The folder contains 9 letters written by Catherine Isabella McLean, from Maraekakaho and Glenorchy, Hawke's Bay, 1861-1875.Includes one letter written by Annabella McLean from Edinburgh in Nov 1862

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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Page 1 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (MD)




My dear brother

I have not written you since I came here as almost then I heard by yourself also by the public papers your intention of coming home which offcourse we all expected would have been long ere this so that I hope the prospect of meeting you personally will be sufficient apology for my not writing.

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English (MD)


The suspense I have been kept in during summer is inexplicable. Every mail expecting to hear of your of [crossed out] having sailed but in every letter more indefinite than another as to your movements . My friends at the station are but indifferent politicians for they never mention the state of the country farther than the humdrum phrase that they themselves are not inlisted. The papers they send are also void of intelligence. Nothing in them beyond some vulgar drivelling regarding their own district matters. I would take it as a great boon when you do next write me to send me an Auckland paper. Uncle is most impatient for your arrival. When first he heard of your coming a young lady from the Glen wrote me that she thought Rev McColl had begun to count the hours for his nephew's arrival. Probably the papers will have announced to you ere this the death

Page 3 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

of the Marquis of Breadalbane. Uncle I have no doubt feels it much for with him are ceased all his connection with that noble house. In regard to my having left Glenorchy I understand you are not at all pleased but surely my dear brother you will allow me some degree of judgment in this acting for myself. I did not do so without mature consideration nor without my Uncle's sanction though offcourse felt he did so reluctantly.

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English (MD)


To leave Glenorchy was more painful to me than annoying to him though my Uncle did not think so. There I felt I had a home and a position quite suited to my taste and one I was in every way qualified for. But withal there was the perpetual feeling of dissatisfaction with my attainments and the disappointment awaiting both yourself and nor could I not in some measure reward you for your just and hopeful indulgences to me and allow me to say

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English (MD)

that all the happiness the highest ambition I crave in this world is to fulfill the hope which I somehow or other have the presentment you place in me for future usefulness. I have read much since I came here. Gone through Macauleys history of England. His essay Hume's history and a great deal of minor light reading in French. I am anxious to attain French conversation but that is impossible with the meagre advantages I have in a provincial place such as this.

My cousin Mrs Walker keeps a very good governess but masters are much more improving. However this place suits me in many respects. I have many little domestique enjoyments which I could not expect from strangers and Mrs Walker's board is not so exhorbitant as others with the same privileges but I do not say that I reside here from choice. The society here is by no means what I should like

Page 6 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

or have any sympathy with, but the precarious way in which I am placed without a regular remittance retards my progress and subjects me to many many disagreeables but perhaps in that I am myself to blame being as you reproved me for not sufficiently explicit but I think in that respect there is little explicitness required. You know I am now alone with none but yourself to be .... too and I do not think you ever will have to regret

Page 7 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

doing a brother's duty to me. I am glad you like Mrs McLean and that you say my dear Catherine is a comfort to you. She seems bitterly to deplore having left me alone but I hope ultimately she will have profitable reason to think otherwise. Little Douglas is a source of much happiness to them both. Cath is so uplifted about his cleverness. They say he is so manly & affectionate. I was sorry to hear of the indisposition of John's

Page 8 of 8. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

wife. I had a letter lately from John's wife [crossed out] Mrs General Fraser. She mentioned having seen Capt McDonald in August. He was very well and making enquiries regarding your coming home. She also hears regularly from Mrs General Skinner who is now beyond eighty and wonderfully vigorous. Mrs Fraser is most anxious to hear accounts of her cousin Mrs Gascoyne. I write this in the painful uncertainty whether you will receive it in New Zealand or not. My love to all. Should you see them.


I am my dear brother your afft sister
Annabella
George Street
Stranraer

Nov 24th/62

English (MD)




My dear brother

I have not written you since I came here as almost then I heard by yourself also by the public papers your intention of coming home which offcourse we all expected would have been long ere this so that I hope the prospect of meeting you personally will be sufficient apology for my not writing.

The suspense I have been kept in during summer is inexplicable. Every mail expecting to hear of your of [crossed out] having sailed but in every letter more indefinite than another as to your movements . My friends at the station are but indifferent politicians for they never mention the state of the country farther than the humdrum phrase that they themselves are not inlisted. The papers they send are also void of intelligence. Nothing in them beyond some vulgar drivelling regarding their own district matters. I would take it as a great boon when you do next write me to send me an Auckland paper. Uncle is most impatient for your arrival. When first he heard of your coming a young lady from the Glen wrote me that she thought Rev McColl had begun to count the hours for his nephew's arrival. Probably the papers will have announced to you ere this the death of the Marquis of Breadalbane. Uncle I have no doubt feels it much for with him are ceased all his connection with that noble house. In regard to my having left Glenorchy I understand you are not at all pleased but surely my dear brother you will allow me some degree of judgment in this acting for myself. I did not do so without mature consideration nor without my Uncle's sanction though offcourse felt he did so reluctantly.

To leave Glenorchy was more painful to me than annoying to him though my Uncle did not think so. There I felt I had a home and a position quite suited to my taste and one I was in every way qualified for. But withal there was the perpetual feeling of dissatisfaction with my attainments and the disappointment awaiting both yourself and nor could I not in some measure reward you for your just and hopeful indulgences to me and allow me to say that all the happiness the highest ambition I crave in this world is to fulfill the hope which I somehow or other have the presentment you place in me for future usefulness. I have read much since I came here. Gone through Macauleys history of England. His essay Hume's history and a great deal of minor light reading in French. I am anxious to attain French conversation but that is impossible with the meagre advantages I have in a provincial place such as this.

My cousin Mrs Walker keeps a very good governess but masters are much more improving. However this place suits me in many respects. I have many little domestique enjoyments which I could not expect from strangers and Mrs Walker's board is not so exhorbitant as others with the same privileges but I do not say that I reside here from choice. The society here is by no means what I should like or have any sympathy with, but the precarious way in which I am placed without a regular remittance retards my progress and subjects me to many many disagreeables but perhaps in that I am myself to blame being as you reproved me for not sufficiently explicit but I think in that respect there is little explicitness required. You know I am now alone with none but yourself to be .... too and I do not think you ever will have to regret doing a brother's duty to me. I am glad you like Mrs McLean and that you say my dear Catherine is a comfort to you. She seems bitterly to deplore having left me alone but I hope ultimately she will have profitable reason to think otherwise. Little Douglas is a source of much happiness to them both. Cath is so uplifted about his cleverness. They say he is so manly & affectionate. I was sorry to hear of the indisposition of John's wife. I had a letter lately from John's wife [crossed out] Mrs General Fraser. She mentioned having seen Capt McDonald in August. He was very well and making enquiries regarding your coming home. She also hears regularly from Mrs General Skinner who is now beyond eighty and wonderfully vigorous. Mrs Fraser is most anxious to hear accounts of her cousin Mrs Gascoyne. I write this in the painful uncertainty whether you will receive it in New Zealand or not. My love to all. Should you see them.


I am my dear brother your afft sister
Annabella
George Street
Stranraer

Nov 24th/62

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Catherine Hart (sister); Catherine Isabella McLean (sister-in-law), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0811 (71 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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