Object #1010270 from MS-Papers-0032-0818

6 pages written 21 Sep 1868 by Archibald John McLean in Glenorchy to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0818 (112 digitised items). Letters written from Maraekakaho, Warleigh, Doonside and Glenorchy about station matters and family news.Letter dated 24 Oct 1874 recounts the McLean family's lineage and gives dates of birth for family members

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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English (MD)

21 September 1868

Glenorchy

My dear Donald

The last week I had no rest at night for three nights with dreams about you and I am convinced you must be in some deep watter with this miserable Government that are to all appearances doing all they can to destroy the country and make the natives that you laboured so hard in gaining over to lose all confidence in the government and from what I hear a great many of the friendlier are gaving way and I think no wonder at it when a man like Whitmore is allowed so much power in matters he knows so little about. A man detested both by black and white and a man by all accounts if he would answer would never tell the truth. That is the character he gets from all that know him both rich and poor. I must tell you that Mr Ormond's speech oppened

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English (MD)

our eyes here and showed all the people how the blunders were caused on the East Coast. I can assure you it gave me very great satisfaction and pleasure for I always was afraid that you might get some part of the blame but thank God my idea on that point was cleared up in that noble and manly speech of Mr Ormond's. I will always think more of the man than ever for the candour of his speech.

The most peculiar dream I had was a few nights before Major Fraser's men were called away, a fanatical and blind arbitory order leaving a whole large and populous districk totally unprotected. The very friendly natives hear depricate the movement in a very decided way. The dream was this. I saw you well dressed and was speaking to you but could not in any way prevent you from walking head and ear [?] and till I saw he had disapear in the water stope you [crossed out]. Then I called to you but you made no answer

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English (MD)

but looked very strange and I could not see you properly coming out of the clear water. When I woke and said to Catherine you were in some trouble. Since that I have had several more dreams but none I consider bad ones but the foregoing one at once proved the annoyance in the removal of Fraser. I consider the reading of the foregoing dream so that I hope things are now doing better and that ministers will see their errors and devise some proper policy and allow those who ought to know the native mind to deal with them and settle the East Coast that might have been settled long ago if allowed at the proper time to confiscate the land and decided steps taken. It will now from what I hear cost both money and likely blood to settle what good sound sense and diplomacy would have done at the time the war was over.

I now must tell you of myself. I am sorry to say I cannot put my foot under me as yet but I go about on cruches and I dare say if I would have gaven it more rest than I do it would have been better but I hope to be able to use it in a month or

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English (MD)

so. I have a man and keep him employed about fences and improving about the place. Old Willie Cooper came up to see me the other day and gave me a good deal of news. Poor old man he is a sta[un]ch friend of yours. I hope you will call on him when you come back. He was sorry you had not done so when he last passed but I told him the cause, the want of time. Mr Condie comes up on Sundays to see me and I get some news from him and Duff. The weather has been very much against operation in cultivating most all last month and part of this but its very fine this few days back but cold. We will have plenty of grass from appearances. I hope you hear from Alexr and that he is well. I was in the hope of having a few lines from you but I supose you have so much to do and bother einough still I would like a few lines. Of course Condie writes all the necessary news and the sale of some sheep to some digging butchers. I hope the market will improve. By all accounts it is likely to do so. They got in some bother with the steamer through some

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English (MD)

mismanagement of Kinrosses that may have a very injurious effect on them coming back for the rest that they bought but I hope not.

I have no news of any importance. I do not know anything of how Williams is getting on. Of course if no one backs him up he must be in a rather queer way, rent coming due and nothing to meet it. I wonder if John McLean received the parcel of blue gums I sent him care of Mrs Hart. I think if he had he would have exknowledged receipt of them. I would like him to get them as I promised to send them to him last year. It is possible they went astray. I send them with Condie and he gave them to Kenedy who said he would forward them and I make no doubt but he did. This place is looking very well at preasant and the English grasses showing to great advantage. Have you had any a/c of any of the sale of the scoured wool or locks. I would like to hear how they did as the

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English (MD)

man is anxious to know so as to improve on last year's mode of washing if he will be required to was more than [crossed out] this year than last. I hope Catherine and Annabella are quite well. It is strange Annabella never wrote me since I got this broaken leg. She certainly is a strange girl. That was not the way I did with her when helpless and in want of consolation however it matters not. I dare say she will feel it all the same if not it is very unnatural. Catherine always writes and always did. I hope you here good accounts from dear Douglas. I have had a number of dreams about him lately and I consider very good ones. Indeed he is often in my mind. This broaken leg has gavin me more time for many reflections and on the whole may prove a great beneft to me. I believe all those things is brought about for some wise end. I now must end with every good wish.


You always affectionate
Archibald John McLean

English (MD)

21 September 1868

Glenorchy

My dear Donald

The last week I had no rest at night for three nights with dreams about you and I am convinced you must be in some deep watter with this miserable Government that are to all appearances doing all they can to destroy the country and make the natives that you laboured so hard in gaining over to lose all confidence in the government and from what I hear a great many of the friendlier are gaving way and I think no wonder at it when a man like Whitmore is allowed so much power in matters he knows so little about. A man detested both by black and white and a man by all accounts if he would answer would never tell the truth. That is the character he gets from all that know him both rich and poor. I must tell you that Mr Ormond's speech oppened our eyes here and showed all the people how the blunders were caused on the East Coast. I can assure you it gave me very great satisfaction and pleasure for I always was afraid that you might get some part of the blame but thank God my idea on that point was cleared up in that noble and manly speech of Mr Ormond's. I will always think more of the man than ever for the candour of his speech.

The most peculiar dream I had was a few nights before Major Fraser's men were called away, a fanatical and blind arbitory order leaving a whole large and populous districk totally unprotected. The very friendly natives hear depricate the movement in a very decided way. The dream was this. I saw you well dressed and was speaking to you but could not in any way prevent you from walking head and ear [?] and till I saw he had disapear in the water stope you [crossed out]. Then I called to you but you made no answer but looked very strange and I could not see you properly coming out of the clear water. When I woke and said to Catherine you were in some trouble. Since that I have had several more dreams but none I consider bad ones but the foregoing one at once proved the annoyance in the removal of Fraser. I consider the reading of the foregoing dream so that I hope things are now doing better and that ministers will see their errors and devise some proper policy and allow those who ought to know the native mind to deal with them and settle the East Coast that might have been settled long ago if allowed at the proper time to confiscate the land and decided steps taken. It will now from what I hear cost both money and likely blood to settle what good sound sense and diplomacy would have done at the time the war was over.

I now must tell you of myself. I am sorry to say I cannot put my foot under me as yet but I go about on cruches and I dare say if I would have gaven it more rest than I do it would have been better but I hope to be able to use it in a month or so. I have a man and keep him employed about fences and improving about the place. Old Willie Cooper came up to see me the other day and gave me a good deal of news. Poor old man he is a sta[un]ch friend of yours. I hope you will call on him when you come back. He was sorry you had not done so when he last passed but I told him the cause, the want of time. Mr Condie comes up on Sundays to see me and I get some news from him and Duff. The weather has been very much against operation in cultivating most all last month and part of this but its very fine this few days back but cold. We will have plenty of grass from appearances. I hope you hear from Alexr and that he is well. I was in the hope of having a few lines from you but I supose you have so much to do and bother einough still I would like a few lines. Of course Condie writes all the necessary news and the sale of some sheep to some digging butchers. I hope the market will improve. By all accounts it is likely to do so. They got in some bother with the steamer through some mismanagement of Kinrosses that may have a very injurious effect on them coming back for the rest that they bought but I hope not.

I have no news of any importance. I do not know anything of how Williams is getting on. Of course if no one backs him up he must be in a rather queer way, rent coming due and nothing to meet it. I wonder if John McLean received the parcel of blue gums I sent him care of Mrs Hart. I think if he had he would have exknowledged receipt of them. I would like him to get them as I promised to send them to him last year. It is possible they went astray. I send them with Condie and he gave them to Kenedy who said he would forward them and I make no doubt but he did. This place is looking very well at preasant and the English grasses showing to great advantage. Have you had any a/c of any of the sale of the scoured wool or locks. I would like to hear how they did as the man is anxious to know so as to improve on last year's mode of washing if he will be required to was more than [crossed out] this year than last. I hope Catherine and Annabella are quite well. It is strange Annabella never wrote me since I got this broaken leg. She certainly is a strange girl. That was not the way I did with her when helpless and in want of consolation however it matters not. I dare say she will feel it all the same if not it is very unnatural. Catherine always writes and always did. I hope you here good accounts from dear Douglas. I have had a number of dreams about him lately and I consider very good ones. Indeed he is often in my mind. This broaken leg has gavin me more time for many reflections and on the whole may prove a great beneft to me. I believe all those things is brought about for some wise end. I now must end with every good wish.


You always affectionate
Archibald John McLean

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0818 (112 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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