Object #1009789 from MS-Papers-0032-0818

7 pages written 21 Aug 1874 by Archibald John McLean in Glenorchy to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0818 (112 digitised items). Letters written from Maraekakaho, Warleigh, Doonside and Glenorchy about station matters and family news.Letter dated 24 Oct 1874 recounts the McLean family's lineage and gives dates of birth for family members

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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Page 1 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

21 August 1874

Glenorchy

Dear Donald

I return you my best thanks for sending me the Parliamentary papers and Mr Vogel's speech which is a very able one indeed as he clears up all points in a very masterly [way]. Still it is to be hoped the Californian mail dificulty will still be got over and it continued as it will be of the greatest advantage to this country. As to natives reports they are very interesting indeed, all but one part that shows me how disinterested you were in not getting the free grant the West Coast people made to you in time before it was I supose lost forever. It would now be very valuable but

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English (MD)

you have plenty with God's blessing and it is progressing pritty well.

The onley thing I greatley demure is the great loss of time and so many men paid and onley a few doing the work of the maney for want of prompt supervision and desisive action. There is one thing I am certain of is this that if I had 20 or 30 acres plowed up now while David Shimming [?] is here eigher up here or half way between the cottage & the station and left lying all sumer and then plowed up in autumn and planted out with the blue gums, oaks and pine, the old man has got that it would pay better than having the man all idling about at triffles. I would take in hand to see to it with one man under me and in one year it is not to much to say I would have it all planted and then should you wish the place would do to build a house on for yourself. At all events it would cloth the country and I would leave something to look at for those that came after us. But the way time is lost without a sistem is to me a breakheart. I would like to have you for a night to explain many matters but I hope you will soon come up. The affair with Smith must be settled at once. I am certain neigher you nor I would have any dificulty in setteling that bound[a]ry

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English (MD)

and I am convinced Condie for want of caution winders [widens] the breach if any. Smith never as much a[s] hinted anything to me and we are always on the best of terms as nighbours. I do wish you to have it settled when you come up. I need not say the gratification it has gaven us your knighthood but it is a baronetsey I expected but that will come I am certain. I was quite anoyed the view the Herald toke of it, coupeling Vogel with you. What service did he do in comparison with yours. A man a few years to be compaired with a man of 1/4 century is ridiculous. Let him be ever so cliver no doubt but he is in his own way. I was please[d] your opponents in politics took such a broad view and made

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English (MD)

such nice remarks. Your poor old aunts at home will die pleased after this and the Tyree people may and will be proud of it. The first there island ever produced. There was two or three of our race, but not born there, knighted. You I think will make the fourth.

I am sorry to say I am writing under dificulty as I got a fall by a horse coming down with me eight days ago a few 100 yard from house just after parting from Condie below the fence. Fortunately I got him to come home with me and pull the joint in it place but 2 of my ribs are broken but I will soon be about again. I was so pleased [to] hear you enjoyed

Page 5 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

your trip to Australia and I hope the horses and sheep will pay well. I now end hoping to soon see you up here.

Yours ever affectionately
Archibald John McLean

PS. Just as I was finishing this Hugh McLean came in to see me and told me that he had met Collinson that bought the block at the back of the run and in the course of conversation he asked him what he was going to do with it. His reply was that he was going to fence. That will cause great annoyance besides having to pay the ½ of fencing when McLean says some compensation or a certain compensation would be advisable to buy him out

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English (MD)

rather than the future annoyance of clearing roads for his stock etc coming on this block. But McLean said he was afraid he would make a mess of it. McLean is the man that leaced Mason's run and was once at the station and a very respectable man. You know who I mean, and the fencing McLean says he is determined to go with and that before long. So just as he wants to commence the fence would be the time to offer him compensation and get clear of him as I believe from what McLean says he would take so much. From what passed between him and this man their would not be much dificulty in arranging

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English (MD)

with him. If you were here or some one with authority to trete [?] with him. His coming their will gave no end of trouble if he was to take £50 or £100 more than he paid for the land it would be well to get clear of him ever more.


Yours always
Archibald John McLean

English (MD)

21 August 1874

Glenorchy

Dear Donald

I return you my best thanks for sending me the Parliamentary papers and Mr Vogel's speech which is a very able one indeed as he clears up all points in a very masterly [way]. Still it is to be hoped the Californian mail dificulty will still be got over and it continued as it will be of the greatest advantage to this country. As to natives reports they are very interesting indeed, all but one part that shows me how disinterested you were in not getting the free grant the West Coast people made to you in time before it was I supose lost forever. It would now be very valuable but you have plenty with God's blessing and it is progressing pritty well.

The onley thing I greatley demure is the great loss of time and so many men paid and onley a few doing the work of the maney for want of prompt supervision and desisive action. There is one thing I am certain of is this that if I had 20 or 30 acres plowed up now while David Shimming [?] is here eigher up here or half way between the cottage & the station and left lying all sumer and then plowed up in autumn and planted out with the blue gums, oaks and pine, the old man has got that it would pay better than having the man all idling about at triffles. I would take in hand to see to it with one man under me and in one year it is not to much to say I would have it all planted and then should you wish the place would do to build a house on for yourself. At all events it would cloth the country and I would leave something to look at for those that came after us. But the way time is lost without a sistem is to me a breakheart. I would like to have you for a night to explain many matters but I hope you will soon come up. The affair with Smith must be settled at once. I am certain neigher you nor I would have any dificulty in setteling that bound[a]ry and I am convinced Condie for want of caution winders [widens] the breach if any. Smith never as much a[s] hinted anything to me and we are always on the best of terms as nighbours. I do wish you to have it settled when you come up. I need not say the gratification it has gaven us your knighthood but it is a baronetsey I expected but that will come I am certain. I was quite anoyed the view the Herald toke of it, coupeling Vogel with you. What service did he do in comparison with yours. A man a few years to be compaired with a man of 1/4 century is ridiculous. Let him be ever so cliver no doubt but he is in his own way. I was please[d] your opponents in politics took such a broad view and made such nice remarks. Your poor old aunts at home will die pleased after this and the Tyree people may and will be proud of it. The first there island ever produced. There was two or three of our race, but not born there, knighted. You I think will make the fourth.

I am sorry to say I am writing under dificulty as I got a fall by a horse coming down with me eight days ago a few 100 yard from house just after parting from Condie below the fence. Fortunately I got him to come home with me and pull the joint in it place but 2 of my ribs are broken but I will soon be about again. I was so pleased [to] hear you enjoyed your trip to Australia and I hope the horses and sheep will pay well. I now end hoping to soon see you up here.

Yours ever affectionately
Archibald John McLean

PS. Just as I was finishing this Hugh McLean came in to see me and told me that he had met Collinson that bought the block at the back of the run and in the course of conversation he asked him what he was going to do with it. His reply was that he was going to fence. That will cause great annoyance besides having to pay the ½ of fencing when McLean says some compensation or a certain compensation would be advisable to buy him out rather than the future annoyance of clearing roads for his stock etc coming on this block. But McLean said he was afraid he would make a mess of it. McLean is the man that leaced Mason's run and was once at the station and a very respectable man. You know who I mean, and the fencing McLean says he is determined to go with and that before long. So just as he wants to commence the fence would be the time to offer him compensation and get clear of him as I believe from what McLean says he would take so much. From what passed between him and this man their would not be much dificulty in arranging with him. If you were here or some one with authority to trete [?] with him. His coming their will gave no end of trouble if he was to take £50 or £100 more than he paid for the land it would be well to get clear of him ever more.


Yours always
Archibald John McLean

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0818 (112 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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