Object #1009781 from MS-Papers-0032-0003A

7 pages written 20 Jun 1850 by an unknown author in Wellington to Wellington

From: Native Land Purchase Commissioner - Papers, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0003A (55 digitised items). No Item Description

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

Download alow-resolution PDF or high-resolution PDF

Page 1 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)


COPY.

Letter from Donald McLean, Land Commissioner, to the Honble, the Colonial Secretary, dated 20th, June 1850. Relative to payment of Second Instalment on Rangitikei purchase.
Wellington,
June 20th. 1850.


Sir,

I beg that you will inform His Excellency, the Lieut. Governor, that I have received intelligence from the Coast that the Rangitikei natives are becoming most discontented at the delay in paying the Second Instalment of purchase money for that district.

Secondly, - I am further informed that at Turakina, they have prevented

Page 2 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

the settlers from going on with the selection or occupation of land; in consequence of the Government, in whom they had previously the most unlimited confidence, not having met those engagements which it is by public treaty, entered into with mutual assurances of good faith, most strictly and religiously bound to observe.

Thirdly, - It will not satisfy the natives, - nor do I conceive that it would be altogether becoming, to inform

Page 3 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

them that the Government are unable to meet this payment; as that belief would not only alienate the faith of the tribe with whom we are now in treaty, - but that of all others in the Province, from whom the Government may either now, or eventually desire to purchase land. For instance, - at the Wairarapa they might justly argue that the settlers are more punctual in paying their annual rentals, than the Government promise to be in carrying out that

Page 4 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

admirable system of paying annual Instalments. It is equally evident, - although I cannot help feeling the difficulty in which the Government is places, - that the natives who do so recognise the New Zealand Company in the present transaction, should not be visited with the temporary inability of that body to fulfil its obligations to the Government.

Fourthly, - it should also be taken into serious consideration that English

Page 5 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

settlers, with their flocks, and herds, are daily finding their way to the beautiful and fertile Rangitikei plains; dissatisfaction among the natives will soon be felt by their European neighbours, - a feeling of insecurity will naturally follow, and the most flourishing and rapidly improving district that Wellington possesses, will not only diminish in its present intrinsic value, but what is of still greater importance,

Page 6 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

it will fall in the estimation of those industrious colonists who regard this promising district as a permanent home for themselves, and the numerous friends who may be induced to join them from the Mother country.

Fifthly, - I would therefore earnestly request that some means should be taken to furnish me in silver, with the sum of £500 due to the natives; so as to enable me

Page 7 of 7. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

to proceed to Rangitikei in the early part of next week.


I have the honor to remain Sir, Your most obedient servant, (Signed)
Donald McLan,
Land Commissioner, To:- The Honble, The Colonial Secretary Wellington.

English (ATL)


COPY.

Letter from Donald McLean, Land Commissioner, to the Honble, the Colonial Secretary, dated 20th, June 1850. Relative to payment of Second Instalment on Rangitikei purchase.
Wellington,
June 20th. 1850.


Sir,

I beg that you will inform His Excellency, the Lieut. Governor, that I have received intelligence from the Coast that the Rangitikei natives are becoming most discontented at the delay in paying the Second Instalment of purchase money for that district.

Secondly, - I am further informed that at Turakina, they have prevented the settlers from going on with the selection or occupation of land; in consequence of the Government, in whom they had previously the most unlimited confidence, not having met those engagements which it is by public treaty, entered into with mutual assurances of good faith, most strictly and religiously bound to observe.

Thirdly, - It will not satisfy the natives, - nor do I conceive that it would be altogether becoming, to inform them that the Government are unable to meet this payment; as that belief would not only alienate the faith of the tribe with whom we are now in treaty, - but that of all others in the Province, from whom the Government may either now, or eventually desire to purchase land. For instance, - at the Wairarapa they might justly argue that the settlers are more punctual in paying their annual rentals, than the Government promise to be in carrying out that admirable system of paying annual Instalments. It is equally evident, - although I cannot help feeling the difficulty in which the Government is places, - that the natives who do so recognise the New Zealand Company in the present transaction, should not be visited with the temporary inability of that body to fulfil its obligations to the Government.

Fourthly, - it should also be taken into serious consideration that English settlers, with their flocks, and herds, are daily finding their way to the beautiful and fertile Rangitikei plains; dissatisfaction among the natives will soon be felt by their European neighbours, - a feeling of insecurity will naturally follow, and the most flourishing and rapidly improving district that Wellington possesses, will not only diminish in its present intrinsic value, but what is of still greater importance, it will fall in the estimation of those industrious colonists who regard this promising district as a permanent home for themselves, and the numerous friends who may be induced to join them from the Mother country.

Fifthly, - I would therefore earnestly request that some means should be taken to furnish me in silver, with the sum of £500 due to the natives; so as to enable me to proceed to Rangitikei in the early part of next week.


I have the honor to remain Sir, Your most obedient servant, (Signed)
Donald McLan,
Land Commissioner, To:- The Honble, The Colonial Secretary Wellington.

Part of:
Native Land Purchase Commissioner - Papers, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0003A (55 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

Usage: You can search, browse, print and download items from this website for research and personal study. You are welcome to reproduce the above image(s) on your blog or another website, but please maintain the integrity of the image (i.e. don't crop, recolour or overprint it), reproduce the image's caption information and link back to here (http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=1009781). If you would like to use the above image(s) in a different way (e.g. in a print publication), or use the transcription or translation, permission must be obtained. More information about copyright and usage can be found on the Copyright and Usage page of the NLNZ web site.

External Links:
View Full Descriptive Record in TAPUHI

Leave a comment

This function is coming soon.

Latest comments