Object #1009503 from MS-Papers-0032-0276

3 pages written 20 Jun 1858 by Josiah Flight in Te Henui to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Josiah Flight, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0276 (45 digitised items). 43 letters addressed from Mangoraka, Te Ika Moana, Resident Magistrate's Office, New Plymouth, Henui, 1846-1872, and undated. Also letter from A D Flight, 6 Mar [187-], New Plymouth to Sir Donald McLean; letter from Josiah Flight to Thomas Kelly, 22 Jul 1870 re Cape Egmont Flax CompanyAlso poem addressed to `My dear Donald McLean' entitled `No Land' (on verso) written by Josiah Flight

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Henui

20th June 1858



My dear Sir,

The letters of which I send you copies were shewn to me by Mr. Stockman and as I thought it of some importance that the Government should be put in possession of the present views of Ihaia or rather of Nikorima for I look on the latter as the more important person I deemed it but to make you thus acquainted with them. Ihaia has I believe for many years, and Nikorima for a somewhat shorter period been anxious that the lands belonging to them and their people should be disposed of to the English so that after repurchasing what they might require they would be placed more fully under our laws and thereby enjoy the security, peace, and prosperity which they feel they cannot obtain under their own customs and guidance. They express themselves as disappointed at not receiving any encouragement from the Government. On the other hand Wiremu Kingi has shewn every disposition to prevent the alienation of the land and to thwart any attempt to bring the Natives under one common rule. All attempts to make

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English (ATL)

peace during this last quarrel have been rejected by him; and though so cowardly as to run away screeching from some eight or nine boys (really so) when with some say forty some eighty at his back he surprized them; they to his astonishment facing round and cooly firing on his party: he yet by his cunning appears in the eyes of the Natives to have boarded the Government, setting them at defiance were the Government to entertain Nikorima's proposals and with him and Ihaia treat for the purchase of their lands I believe any determined act of the Government of such a character would make the wily coward succumb to the necessities of the case and bring him to be a land seller as well I do not think anything else will. The circumstances of some of the Waikatos favourable to the Maori King movement having been to the Waitara to use their influence to put an end to the quarrel may I fear have some effect on Ihaia and Nikorima's people in inducing them to place themselves under that protection. They more particularly Nikorima are at the present time well affected, but can we expect them to continue so unless we hold out to them some hope that their situation will receive our attention, and that some means will be adopted for preventing others from interfering with them in the sale of their lands. This it must be borne in mind is the real cause of quarrel, as no one for a moment now believes that the death of Katatori has anything to do with it.

Mr. Halse has I suppose informed you that Ihaia and Nikorima have retired from their pas and gone to Vrenui. W. King and his party burnt them down, when the Taranakis and I believe all but his own people dispersed. Last week it was talked about and obtained credence that he W.K. intended to follow Ihaia and Nikorima to attack them where they now are; and on Saturday one of the Native Policemen who had been to the neighbourhood of the Waitara on duty brought up word that he intended to do so on Monday (to-morrow)

The Taranaki Natives returned very quietly to their homes. I had desired Mr. Halse to inform them that they would not be allowed to pass through the town with a display of arms. Tohana and E'Waka of the Kauwau pho poh'd this, but when they found we were determined, shwed the white feather and submitted. The guns were put into a cart and the man pass'd by without any demonstration.

Mr. Whiteley called on me this evening to tell

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English (ATL)

me that copies of the letter of the 15th had been sent by Ihaia and Nikorima one to him, and one to Poharima --- That good man has been indefatigable in his exertions and well deserves the sneers of his caluminators whose grovelling minds cannot appreciate his disinterested conduct.

Stockman has behaved well, and I trust a time will come when he may be rewarded for his exertions. He has been a total abstainer from liquor for some months past and I have little fear now about him on that head.

Ritchie is going on very well. I hope something it to be done to secure the services of such men by giving them proper salaries, or I greatly fear I shall lose him from my Department.

I find the Master of the Steamer is your brother and that another brother is with him; "and now you three will meet again"! I hope I shall see your brothers in the morning.

Mrs. Flight and my daughters send their kind greetings. They often express their wishes that you and your little boy were coming down. You well know how glad I should be to see you.

Believe me
Your's ever very faithfully
Josiah Flight.
D. McLean Esqr.

English (ATL)

Henui

20th June 1858



My dear Sir,

The letters of which I send you copies were shewn to me by Mr. Stockman and as I thought it of some importance that the Government should be put in possession of the present views of Ihaia or rather of Nikorima for I look on the latter as the more important person I deemed it but to make you thus acquainted with them. Ihaia has I believe for many years, and Nikorima for a somewhat shorter period been anxious that the lands belonging to them and their people should be disposed of to the English so that after repurchasing what they might require they would be placed more fully under our laws and thereby enjoy the security, peace, and prosperity which they feel they cannot obtain under their own customs and guidance. They express themselves as disappointed at not receiving any encouragement from the Government. On the other hand Wiremu Kingi has shewn every disposition to prevent the alienation of the land and to thwart any attempt to bring the Natives under one common rule. All attempts to make peace during this last quarrel have been rejected by him; and though so cowardly as to run away screeching from some eight or nine boys (really so) when with some say forty some eighty at his back he surprized them; they to his astonishment facing round and cooly firing on his party: he yet by his cunning appears in the eyes of the Natives to have boarded the Government, setting them at defiance were the Government to entertain Nikorima's proposals and with him and Ihaia treat for the purchase of their lands I believe any determined act of the Government of such a character would make the wily coward succumb to the necessities of the case and bring him to be a land seller as well I do not think anything else will. The circumstances of some of the Waikatos favourable to the Maori King movement having been to the Waitara to use their influence to put an end to the quarrel may I fear have some effect on Ihaia and Nikorima's people in inducing them to place themselves under that protection. They more particularly Nikorima are at the present time well affected, but can we expect them to continue so unless we hold out to them some hope that their situation will receive our attention, and that some means will be adopted for preventing others from interfering with them in the sale of their lands. This it must be borne in mind is the real cause of quarrel, as no one for a moment now believes that the death of Katatori has anything to do with it.

Mr. Halse has I suppose informed you that Ihaia and Nikorima have retired from their pas and gone to Vrenui. W. King and his party burnt them down, when the Taranakis and I believe all but his own people dispersed. Last week it was talked about and obtained credence that he W.K. intended to follow Ihaia and Nikorima to attack them where they now are; and on Saturday one of the Native Policemen who had been to the neighbourhood of the Waitara on duty brought up word that he intended to do so on Monday (to-morrow)

The Taranaki Natives returned very quietly to their homes. I had desired Mr. Halse to inform them that they would not be allowed to pass through the town with a display of arms. Tohana and E'Waka of the Kauwau pho poh'd this, but when they found we were determined, shwed the white feather and submitted. The guns were put into a cart and the man pass'd by without any demonstration.

Mr. Whiteley called on me this evening to tell me that copies of the letter of the 15th had been sent by Ihaia and Nikorima one to him, and one to Poharima --- That good man has been indefatigable in his exertions and well deserves the sneers of his caluminators whose grovelling minds cannot appreciate his disinterested conduct.

Stockman has behaved well, and I trust a time will come when he may be rewarded for his exertions. He has been a total abstainer from liquor for some months past and I have little fear now about him on that head.

Ritchie is going on very well. I hope something it to be done to secure the services of such men by giving them proper salaries, or I greatly fear I shall lose him from my Department.

I find the Master of the Steamer is your brother and that another brother is with him; "and now you three will meet again"! I hope I shall see your brothers in the morning.

Mrs. Flight and my daughters send their kind greetings. They often express their wishes that you and your little boy were coming down. You well know how glad I should be to see you.

Believe me
Your's ever very faithfully
Josiah Flight.
D. McLean Esqr.

Part of:
Inward letters - Josiah Flight, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0276 (45 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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