Object #1009197 from MS-Papers-0032-0001

4 pages written 26 Aug 1844 by an unknown author in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean

From: Protector of Aborigines - Papers, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0001 (21 digitised items). Memos and correspondence with George Clarke, the Chief Protector of Aborigines, including draft reports by McLean on his meetings with Maori relating to disputes and negotiations over land.Also includes translation of a letter (1844) from Te Wherowhero to the Taranaki chiefs urging them not to follow Te Rauparaha's example of confrontation refering to the Wairau conflict (1839) and notes of a meeting between Ngamotu Maori and McLean, 27 Sep 1844.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Copy.
New Plymouth.
26th. August 1844.


Sir,

I have the honor to acquaint you that during His Excellency the Governor's visit to this place, he desired me to obtain what information I could, relative to the Land claimed by the New Zealand Company; and which claims are now disputed by the native owners thereof.

In pursuance of which I proceeded, on the 18th. inst, to the Taniwha and Waitara, - being the Northern boundaries of the New Zealand Company's claims to land in this District. Having visited the natives at their different Pahs in that neighbourhood; and having afterwards had several of them collected together at the Waitara river, I made enquiries of them as to whether the lands there had been sold to the Company. They informed me that they had never consented to a sale of any portions of their lands in that neighbourhood. and further stated that the few natives who assumed the right of sale to those lands, were not the owners thereof, but merely adduced a claim there to from having had two relatives killed and buried there, during some engagement with their rival tribes, the Waikates.

It is evident that there were fifteen natives residing on the Waitara river at the time the sale was effected; who were unacquainted with it till some

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English (ATL)

time afterwards, and who did not receive any share of the payment given by the New Zealand Company.

It appears that the principal native owners of those lands, after a most disastrous conflict with the natives of Waikato, at a Pah called Pukirangiora, about 8 miles from the entrance of the Waitara River, those who located themselves in different parts of the country - principally at Kapiti, Nelson, and Port Nicholson; from the latter place several of them found their way to the Chatham Islands

Within the last two years, many of those who then left, have returned; there being now about 250 natives residing at the different Pahs on the Waitara. This river has always been a favourite resort of the natives; affording them an abundant supply of fresh water fish; which, to them, is a great consideration, as they cannot always have access to the salt water fish.

The resident natives do not at present seem disposed to part with any of their lands in this particular neighbourhood.

Previous to my arrival here there were three Europeans settled on this river; one of whom was prevented from carrying on on his cultivation, as the natives did not tolerate his being there. One is still residing there, and the natives do not appear to give him any annoyance.

Finding that the natives at this place had not conceded the possession of their lands there to the Europeans; and the principal owners thereof being absent, I not consider it advisable then to enter into the question of their

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English (ATL)

individual boundaries.

I proceeded to the Mangaraka river;; where Katatori, the Native Chief, who has been so much complained of by the settlers there, lives. Katatori walked with me over a portion of land about 1300 acres, which he claims for himself and tribe. Of this land, a very small portion belongs to himself individually; but he seems to possess considerable influence over his followers. There are some natives in the tribe who acknowledge having received payment for their lands in that neighbourhood; some of whom are willing to give their individual portions to the Europeans.

While at this settlement, Capt. King, the Police Magistrate, came there to assist me in communicating with Katatori and his tribe. I enclose you a copy of the questions put by that gentleman, and the answers given by Katatori, upon the land claimed by the last-named Chief, for himself and tribe.

There are nine European settlers, who have several acres in cultivation, and houses erected on each respective establishment. Katatori strongly objects to the Europeans holding these lands; giving as his reasons that he received no payment; that the Europeans were not treating him kindly; and that he would not willingly part with any lards over which he had any control, to them.

I have assurances of friendship from the most influential native chiefs here, towards the Europeans; and they generally seem to evince a much better feeling, both among themselves, and with the Europeans, than they have

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English (ATL)

done prior to His Excellency, the Governor's, visit here; and except in a few cases, are in a state of tranquility.

There has been an arrival, from Port Nicholson, of 40 natives belonging to the Ngamotu tribes; with the native chief Muturoa, or Honi Ropiha. From this Chief's conduct, he seems to possess great influnece. Since my arrival here I am of opinion that he will be of great assistance in advising the natives as to the course they are to prusue with regard to their dealings, and general intercourse with the Europeans.

I am about preparing a plan of the lands in this district; which will show the extent of the different claims, both European and native.

I herewith enclose you an account of my travelling expenses, from the time of my departure from Auckland, to the present date.

[unsigned rough draft.]

To:-

The Chief Protector of Aboriginies.
[N.B. The Questions and answers referred to in the foregoing, do not seem to be included in the packet of letters, although they may be found later on. Neither is the list of travelling expences included.]

English (ATL)

Copy.
New Plymouth.
26th. August 1844.


Sir,

I have the honor to acquaint you that during His Excellency the Governor's visit to this place, he desired me to obtain what information I could, relative to the Land claimed by the New Zealand Company; and which claims are now disputed by the native owners thereof.

In pursuance of which I proceeded, on the 18th. inst, to the Taniwha and Waitara, - being the Northern boundaries of the New Zealand Company's claims to land in this District. Having visited the natives at their different Pahs in that neighbourhood; and having afterwards had several of them collected together at the Waitara river, I made enquiries of them as to whether the lands there had been sold to the Company. They informed me that they had never consented to a sale of any portions of their lands in that neighbourhood. and further stated that the few natives who assumed the right of sale to those lands, were not the owners thereof, but merely adduced a claim there to from having had two relatives killed and buried there, during some engagement with their rival tribes, the Waikates.

It is evident that there were fifteen natives residing on the Waitara river at the time the sale was effected; who were unacquainted with it till some time afterwards, and who did not receive any share of the payment given by the New Zealand Company.

It appears that the principal native owners of those lands, after a most disastrous conflict with the natives of Waikato, at a Pah called Pukirangiora, about 8 miles from the entrance of the Waitara River, those who located themselves in different parts of the country - principally at Kapiti, Nelson, and Port Nicholson; from the latter place several of them found their way to the Chatham Islands

Within the last two years, many of those who then left, have returned; there being now about 250 natives residing at the different Pahs on the Waitara. This river has always been a favourite resort of the natives; affording them an abundant supply of fresh water fish; which, to them, is a great consideration, as they cannot always have access to the salt water fish.

The resident natives do not at present seem disposed to part with any of their lands in this particular neighbourhood.

Previous to my arrival here there were three Europeans settled on this river; one of whom was prevented from carrying on on his cultivation, as the natives did not tolerate his being there. One is still residing there, and the natives do not appear to give him any annoyance.

Finding that the natives at this place had not conceded the possession of their lands there to the Europeans; and the principal owners thereof being absent, I not consider it advisable then to enter into the question of their individual boundaries.

I proceeded to the Mangaraka river;; where Katatori, the Native Chief, who has been so much complained of by the settlers there, lives. Katatori walked with me over a portion of land about 1300 acres, which he claims for himself and tribe. Of this land, a very small portion belongs to himself individually; but he seems to possess considerable influence over his followers. There are some natives in the tribe who acknowledge having received payment for their lands in that neighbourhood; some of whom are willing to give their individual portions to the Europeans.

While at this settlement, Capt. King, the Police Magistrate, came there to assist me in communicating with Katatori and his tribe. I enclose you a copy of the questions put by that gentleman, and the answers given by Katatori, upon the land claimed by the last-named Chief, for himself and tribe.

There are nine European settlers, who have several acres in cultivation, and houses erected on each respective establishment. Katatori strongly objects to the Europeans holding these lands; giving as his reasons that he received no payment; that the Europeans were not treating him kindly; and that he would not willingly part with any lards over which he had any control, to them.

I have assurances of friendship from the most influential native chiefs here, towards the Europeans; and they generally seem to evince a much better feeling, both among themselves, and with the Europeans, than they have done prior to His Excellency, the Governor's, visit here; and except in a few cases, are in a state of tranquility.

There has been an arrival, from Port Nicholson, of 40 natives belonging to the Ngamotu tribes; with the native chief Muturoa, or Honi Ropiha. From this Chief's conduct, he seems to possess great influnece. Since my arrival here I am of opinion that he will be of great assistance in advising the natives as to the course they are to prusue with regard to their dealings, and general intercourse with the Europeans.

I am about preparing a plan of the lands in this district; which will show the extent of the different claims, both European and native.

I herewith enclose you an account of my travelling expenses, from the time of my departure from Auckland, to the present date.

[unsigned rough draft.]

To:-

The Chief Protector of Aboriginies.
[N.B. The Questions and answers referred to in the foregoing, do not seem to be included in the packet of letters, although they may be found later on. Neither is the list of travelling expences included.]

Part of:
Protector of Aborigines - Papers, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0001 (21 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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