Object #1009076 from MS-Papers-0032-0183

12 pages written by Sir Thomas Robert Gore Browne to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Sir Thomas Gore Browne (Governor), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0183 (75 digitised items). 70 letters, 1855-1860

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 12. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Confidential
My dear McLean

I gather from your letter that the arrival of troops will take you by surprize.

Govt. arrived at the determination to send them there after obtaining a promise from Featherstone that he would pay for their accomodation. Ministers then advised they abould be sent without delay and I sent more than are required to remain

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English (ATL)

because, from Curling's letter, we thought Moananui might be troublesome. As soon as the Barracks are finished two companies only will remain. I have a sort of regard for old Hapuku and shall be very sorry to see him quite done for. Davis is going the whole Hog: Margan has sent up one of his letters encouraging King making etc. etc. which

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English (ATL)

Ministers think may perhaps be brought under the head of sedition. I do not think so though I earnestly wish it. Carleton has been up the Waikato and the day after his return published a violent attack upon the native office and did the utmost in his power to further the King movement which he deprecates. I sent for Fenton and told him that though I acquitted him of writing the artivle I believed he had inspired

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English (ATL)

it. He assured me he had not but that Ashwell and others had done so. I then asked what measures he had taken to convince both parties that the statement alluded to was absolutely false or so colored as to give a false impression to those who read it. He admitted that he had not done anything to undeceive Carleton though he travelled with him - Richmond, and I then gave him a most serious lecture and he

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English (ATL)

promises to express his regret in writing and for the future to abstain from writing and speaking any thing at all on Govt. affairs. I told him that if he had written the article I should have advised his removal. I am satisfied that he now regrets his error and I hope and think he will not err again in this way.

It may be satisfactory to you to know that though Ministers

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English (ATL)

thought it inadvisable to speak to Carleton (in which I entirely agree) they were disgusted at the attack upon the office which they say, very properly, is really on them and me.

I know you disgegard such rubbish but you may like to know that Carleton is (as usual) alone in his opinion.

I wrote you in my last that Captain Loring was afraid

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English (ATL)

to take the Iris to Napier so that I must now wait until after the meeting of the Assembly to go there. I wish to go there very much but I know you will make all square with the settlers for me. I will certainly go as soon as I can.

I think I told you that Kemp has brought a fine block close to the Lake near Waimate and that we settled on a place

Page 8 of 12. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

close to the mouth of the Kiri Kiri for a new township. New Plymouth is a good deal agitated and the press call loudly for an interference which I have positively refused. Sinclair is coming here by sea and was to sail in Decr. I forgot to tell you that Carleton promises six articles on native affairs with plenty of Cayenne In them - I say "all men in public life eat a peck of dirt" and whether any individual gets half or a quarter more

Page 9 of 12. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

will signify nothing/in a very short time.

The Napier paper of Jan. 30 has just arrived and I see in it a very sensible and temperate memorial for separation from Wellington: I sincerely hope it may be successful. There is nothing in the new acts of Parliament or the Constitution Act to prevent it.

Steward has heard from

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English (ATL)

the Land Commissioner at Otago that no land has been applied for for him and he is consequently done. He is going to Otago to see if he can pick up any of the stray halfpence but I would not give much for his chance.

He sees the difference between an agent whom he does not know and a staunch

English (ATL)

Confidential
My dear McLean

I gather from your letter that the arrival of troops will take you by surprize.

Govt. arrived at the determination to send them there after obtaining a promise from Featherstone that he would pay for their accomodation. Ministers then advised they abould be sent without delay and I sent more than are required to remain because, from Curling's letter, we thought Moananui might be troublesome. As soon as the Barracks are finished two companies only will remain. I have a sort of regard for old Hapuku and shall be very sorry to see him quite done for. Davis is going the whole Hog: Margan has sent up one of his letters encouraging King making etc. etc. which Ministers think may perhaps be brought under the head of sedition. I do not think so though I earnestly wish it. Carleton has been up the Waikato and the day after his return published a violent attack upon the native office and did the utmost in his power to further the King movement which he deprecates. I sent for Fenton and told him that though I acquitted him of writing the artivle I believed he had inspired it. He assured me he had not but that Ashwell and others had done so. I then asked what measures he had taken to convince both parties that the statement alluded to was absolutely false or so colored as to give a false impression to those who read it. He admitted that he had not done anything to undeceive Carleton though he travelled with him - Richmond, and I then gave him a most serious lecture and he promises to express his regret in writing and for the future to abstain from writing and speaking any thing at all on Govt. affairs. I told him that if he had written the article I should have advised his removal. I am satisfied that he now regrets his error and I hope and think he will not err again in this way.

It may be satisfactory to you to know that though Ministers thought it inadvisable to speak to Carleton (in which I entirely agree) they were disgusted at the attack upon the office which they say, very properly, is really on them and me.

I know you disgegard such rubbish but you may like to know that Carleton is (as usual) alone in his opinion.

I wrote you in my last that Captain Loring was afraid to take the Iris to Napier so that I must now wait until after the meeting of the Assembly to go there. I wish to go there very much but I know you will make all square with the settlers for me. I will certainly go as soon as I can.

I think I told you that Kemp has brought a fine block close to the Lake near Waimate and that we settled on a place close to the mouth of the Kiri Kiri for a new township. New Plymouth is a good deal agitated and the press call loudly for an interference which I have positively refused. Sinclair is coming here by sea and was to sail in Decr. I forgot to tell you that Carleton promises six articles on native affairs with plenty of Cayenne In them - I say "all men in public life eat a peck of dirt" and whether any individual gets half or a quarter more will signify nothing/in a very short time.

The Napier paper of Jan. 30 has just arrived and I see in it a very sensible and temperate memorial for separation from Wellington: I sincerely hope it may be successful. There is nothing in the new acts of Parliament or the Constitution Act to prevent it.

Steward has heard from the Land Commissioner at Otago that no land has been applied for for him and he is consequently done. He is going to Otago to see if he can pick up any of the stray halfpence but I would not give much for his chance.

He sees the difference between an agent whom he does not know and a staunch friend like you. He is very grateful for what you have done for him about his property but as he will writes himself he/have said so.

I hope Mr. Curling and the Military will pull well together - I have a high opinion of the former from what I hear and have read but cannot say quite so much for the worthy Colonel.

Believe me My dear McLean
Yours sincerely
G.B. (Gore-Browne)
Feb. 8.


I have just seen a French man from Korarorika who tells me Karoriti's people were much disgusted at my not landing a second time to share in the hoisting the flag there.

I need not tell you that my reasons for not landing had nothing to do with fatigue --- I was not at all tired; but it was the result of careful consideration and consultation with Smith.

Part of:
Inward letters - Sir Thomas Gore Browne (Governor), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0183 (75 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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