Object #1008536 from MS-Papers-0032-0178

6 pages written 29 Jan 1872 by an unknown author in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Charles Brown, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0178 (46 digitised items). 47 letters written from Auckland, 1854; New Plymouth, Taranaki, 1854-1876; Wanganui, Aug 1876; Patea, Oct 1876.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

Download alow-resolution PDF or high-resolution PDF

Page 1 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

New Plymouth

29th. Jany. 1872.



My dear McLean,

While native matters looked quiet I did not think it worth while to trouble you about one or two native matters that could afford to stand over for your arrival here; not that there are any immediate signs of mischief, but there are little strawa floating before the breeze, that I think it well to report to you, I leave Parris to report to you what he may have heard, and you can collate the two; what I hear refers to our Northern frontier, that the Ngatimaniapoto are in an uneasy state, coming to crisis from the execution of Kereopa, which has impressed them with the idea that they may as well be hung for a sheep as a lamb (in reference to the White Cliff murders) - the report has come in various ways to me by Europeans, and I first

Page 2 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

thought it not worth much attention, as these sort of reports sometimes spring into life from the fact that a number of men have been struck off pay, but in this instance I am satisfied it is clear of that fact; this morning Snell, who keeps a general store at the Camp at Wai Iti, told me that he wanted more goods there, but that Ihaia had sold him that there would soon be trouble on the Mokau side, that Tamariki said so likewise, and had also warned Henry Good (brother of T. Good) that his family are in danger residing about a mile up the Urenui on the S.W. bank of it.

As regards my own natives, as I may call them, I had an application from them some time, or rather months back, for the permission of the Government to return to Mawhitiwhiti, I have held this over, thinking to bring it before you personally, I think I mentioned it to Parris, and he advised me to postpone it, but now

Page 3 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

seems to me a desirable time to bring it under your notice, as acceding to their request, now that Titokowaru has come out, might keep them out of any complications if any arose North or South; they also wish to have back Te Rangi, who they tell me is with Mr. Fox - I give seperately the names of the men on whose behalf Karauria and Te Warerata made the applications, the list does not include those names that I supplied to the late Govt. as having volunterily joined Titokowaru, four in number. In the event of any observations adverse to it by the opposition I quote from an official of J. C. Richmond to me of the 8th. Spt. 1868 Nos. 68-1442 No. 1 -

"The Govt. will certainly not lose sight of the peculiar circumstances of the Mawhitiwhiti natives, whose case appears to them to command pity rather than to deserve blame."

Page 4 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)


In the event of any hostilities on the Mokau side, I think that terms having been offered to Tito Kowaru, the return of the Mawhitiwhiti natives to their place would would very much facilitate the obtaining their services against Ngatimaniapoto, if it were deemed advisable; Tito Kowaru included, they did not help him in his difficulties and I do not think there would be any difficulty in enlisting his services and that of his people against Ngatimaniapoto.

I trust these Mokau reports will prove all smoke, we have pretty well restored all that was lost by the war, and reclaimed a deal more that was unoccupied before, butter and stock are at fair prices, the crops look well, we are therefore in every way at a disadvantage for a renewal of, hostilities, which means, even if they do not extend this side of Urenui, a general shutting up of pockets, and the departure of half the population.


Yours ever truly,
Chas. Brown.

Page 5 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)


List of Natives of the Umutahi tribe who apply for permission to return to Mawhitiwhiti.


Wipero

Karira

Motu

Te Waka

Kawe Hiki

Te Rukuwai

Rewiri

Neana

Mitai

Manaia

Puinipi

Ngana

Ngaingai

Tamairi

Aro

Nga Whio

Wakataki

Kake

Tamawhero

Kewetone

Te Rangi (at Mr. Fox's)

Warerata

Karauria

Peppe tamaiti o te Rewiti

Wairau

Poharama

Ropanga Iti

Tonga (Pirumona)

Auika (Pene)

Aki

Taumata

Nuku

Nga Tae

Takoto Ore

Tikawe

Karere

Wiremu (Te rore o Kewe)

(a tohunga formerly)

Matoe

Karaihe

Irai.

English (ATL)

New Plymouth

29th. Jany. 1872.



My dear McLean,

While native matters looked quiet I did not think it worth while to trouble you about one or two native matters that could afford to stand over for your arrival here; not that there are any immediate signs of mischief, but there are little strawa floating before the breeze, that I think it well to report to you, I leave Parris to report to you what he may have heard, and you can collate the two; what I hear refers to our Northern frontier, that the Ngatimaniapoto are in an uneasy state, coming to crisis from the execution of Kereopa, which has impressed them with the idea that they may as well be hung for a sheep as a lamb (in reference to the White Cliff murders) - the report has come in various ways to me by Europeans, and I first thought it not worth much attention, as these sort of reports sometimes spring into life from the fact that a number of men have been struck off pay, but in this instance I am satisfied it is clear of that fact; this morning Snell, who keeps a general store at the Camp at Wai Iti, told me that he wanted more goods there, but that Ihaia had sold him that there would soon be trouble on the Mokau side, that Tamariki said so likewise, and had also warned Henry Good (brother of T. Good) that his family are in danger residing about a mile up the Urenui on the S.W. bank of it.

As regards my own natives, as I may call them, I had an application from them some time, or rather months back, for the permission of the Government to return to Mawhitiwhiti, I have held this over, thinking to bring it before you personally, I think I mentioned it to Parris, and he advised me to postpone it, but now seems to me a desirable time to bring it under your notice, as acceding to their request, now that Titokowaru has come out, might keep them out of any complications if any arose North or South; they also wish to have back Te Rangi, who they tell me is with Mr. Fox - I give seperately the names of the men on whose behalf Karauria and Te Warerata made the applications, the list does not include those names that I supplied to the late Govt. as having volunterily joined Titokowaru, four in number. In the event of any observations adverse to it by the opposition I quote from an official of J. C. Richmond to me of the 8th. Spt. 1868 Nos. 68-1442 No. 1 -

"The Govt. will certainly not lose sight of the peculiar circumstances of the Mawhitiwhiti natives, whose case appears to them to command pity rather than to deserve blame."

In the event of any hostilities on the Mokau side, I think that terms having been offered to Tito Kowaru, the return of the Mawhitiwhiti natives to their place would would very much facilitate the obtaining their services against Ngatimaniapoto, if it were deemed advisable; Tito Kowaru included, they did not help him in his difficulties and I do not think there would be any difficulty in enlisting his services and that of his people against Ngatimaniapoto.

I trust these Mokau reports will prove all smoke, we have pretty well restored all that was lost by the war, and reclaimed a deal more that was unoccupied before, butter and stock are at fair prices, the crops look well, we are therefore in every way at a disadvantage for a renewal of, hostilities, which means, even if they do not extend this side of Urenui, a general shutting up of pockets, and the departure of half the population.


Yours ever truly,
Chas. Brown.

List of Natives of the Umutahi tribe who apply for permission to return to Mawhitiwhiti.


Wipero

Karira

Motu

Te Waka

Kawe Hiki

Te Rukuwai

Rewiri

Neana

Mitai

Manaia

Puinipi

Ngana

Ngaingai

Tamairi

Aro

Nga Whio

Wakataki

Kake

Tamawhero

Kewetone

Te Rangi (at Mr. Fox's)

Warerata

Karauria

Peppe tamaiti o te Rewiti

Wairau

Poharama

Ropanga Iti

Tonga (Pirumona)

Auika (Pene)

Aki

Taumata

Nuku

Nga Tae

Takoto Ore

Tikawe

Karere

Wiremu (Te rore o Kewe)

(a tohunga formerly)

Matoe

Karaihe

Irai.

Part of:
Inward letters - Charles Brown, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0178 (46 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

Usage: You can search, browse, print and download items from this website for research and personal study. You are welcome to reproduce the above image(s) on your blog or another website, but please maintain the integrity of the image (i.e. don't crop, recolour or overprint it), reproduce the image's caption information and link back to here (http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=1008536). If you would like to use the above image(s) in a different way (e.g. in a print publication), or use the transcription or translation, permission must be obtained. More information about copyright and usage can be found on the Copyright and Usage page of the NLNZ web site.

External Links:
View Full Descriptive Record in TAPUHI

Leave a comment

This function is coming soon.

Latest comments