Object #1008373 from MS-Papers-0032-0827

5 pages written 22 Jan 1851 by Susan Douglas McLean in Wellington to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0827 (34 digitised items). Letters between Donald McLean and Susan. Donald's letters written from Hawke's Bay, Rangitikei, Taita and Wairapapa. Susan's letters from Dalmuir Hill, Wellington (the home of her parents (Robert and Susannah Strang).

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
January 22nd 1851


My dear Mr McLean

I wrote a letter last week to send with Mr Park but as he was not to go for some days Papa sent it by a vessel going to Ahuriri. I am glad Mr Park is going to be with you for I am sure you must feel lonely sometimes when you have no one but natives to speak to. I am looking anxiously for a vessel from the East Coast as I expect to have a long letter by the first that arrives. When I come out of my room in the morning the first thing I do is to go and look at the flagstaff to see if there

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English (MD)

is a signal. I hope it will not be long till I have a letter for I weary very much to hear from you. What kind of weather has it been where you are? I do not think we ever had such a warm and dry summer. There has been scarcely any rain for a long time and the heat is so great that I seldom go out during the day. It has really made me quite lazy. You will say however that it is nothing new for me to be lazy. Mrs Durie and all the family have come in. They are to remain for a month or perhaps longer. They have taken the house in which Mr Kirton lived when you were here. Mrs Durie is much better but the baby is very unwell. Mr Kirton is staying now in that new house near his garden which was built for Mr Douglas Wallace. It is a small

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English (MD)

house not nearly so comfortable as the one in which he was last. I went to a party at Mrs Lovell's a few nights ago. I never enjoyed a dance so little. I was very unwilling to go as I had not felt well all day and I would not have gone had I not thought that the Miss Pauls might be unable to go on account of their father's illness and as there are so few young ladies I did not like to disappoint Mrs Lovell. The Pauls went however as Mr Paul was much better.

Tomorrow is the first day of the races. I do not intend going as I do not like them. Mrs Sharp, Mrs Kelham and a great many others have made up a party to go and they wish me to accompany them but as Papa is not going it would not be proper for me to go without him. I am glad he is not going for if he

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English (MD)

was I should have no excuse and if I were to go I would not enjoy it.

I heard a few days ago that you would not be able to return for six months. I hope this is not the case for I can not endure the thought that I shall not see you for so long. I fear you will think I am of a very discontented disposition but I assure you I am not. I would be quite happy and contented in your absence if it were not that I have often a good deal to annoy me and I am sometimes far from being happy. I may be wrong in saying this still I think I should conceal nothing from you. You said when you were here that I ought not to do so. Do not however because I have told you this come in sooner than is inconvenient for you. I should be very sorry if you did. All I wish is that you would tell me in your next letter

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English (MD)

if you think you will be so long so that I may make up my mind to it. I heard from Mrs Shand a few days ago. She and all the family are well. I told you in my last letter that Mr John Smith's mother and brother have arrived. Poor Henry Smith is no better better [crossed out]. He is quite lame. Mrs Smith says that the doctor gives little hope of his recovery.

I must now conclude for my candle is nearly burned out and I cannot get another. Be sure that you write me a very long letter by the next opportunity. Goodnight dear and believe me to remain


Ever your affectionate
Susan Douglas Strang

English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
January 22nd 1851


My dear Mr McLean

I wrote a letter last week to send with Mr Park but as he was not to go for some days Papa sent it by a vessel going to Ahuriri. I am glad Mr Park is going to be with you for I am sure you must feel lonely sometimes when you have no one but natives to speak to. I am looking anxiously for a vessel from the East Coast as I expect to have a long letter by the first that arrives. When I come out of my room in the morning the first thing I do is to go and look at the flagstaff to see if there is a signal. I hope it will not be long till I have a letter for I weary very much to hear from you. What kind of weather has it been where you are? I do not think we ever had such a warm and dry summer. There has been scarcely any rain for a long time and the heat is so great that I seldom go out during the day. It has really made me quite lazy. You will say however that it is nothing new for me to be lazy. Mrs Durie and all the family have come in. They are to remain for a month or perhaps longer. They have taken the house in which Mr Kirton lived when you were here. Mrs Durie is much better but the baby is very unwell. Mr Kirton is staying now in that new house near his garden which was built for Mr Douglas Wallace. It is a small house not nearly so comfortable as the one in which he was last. I went to a party at Mrs Lovell's a few nights ago. I never enjoyed a dance so little. I was very unwilling to go as I had not felt well all day and I would not have gone had I not thought that the Miss Pauls might be unable to go on account of their father's illness and as there are so few young ladies I did not like to disappoint Mrs Lovell. The Pauls went however as Mr Paul was much better.

Tomorrow is the first day of the races. I do not intend going as I do not like them. Mrs Sharp, Mrs Kelham and a great many others have made up a party to go and they wish me to accompany them but as Papa is not going it would not be proper for me to go without him. I am glad he is not going for if he was I should have no excuse and if I were to go I would not enjoy it.

I heard a few days ago that you would not be able to return for six months. I hope this is not the case for I can not endure the thought that I shall not see you for so long. I fear you will think I am of a very discontented disposition but I assure you I am not. I would be quite happy and contented in your absence if it were not that I have often a good deal to annoy me and I am sometimes far from being happy. I may be wrong in saying this still I think I should conceal nothing from you. You said when you were here that I ought not to do so. Do not however because I have told you this come in sooner than is inconvenient for you. I should be very sorry if you did. All I wish is that you would tell me in your next letter if you think you will be so long so that I may make up my mind to it. I heard from Mrs Shand a few days ago. She and all the family are well. I told you in my last letter that Mr John Smith's mother and brother have arrived. Poor Henry Smith is no better better [crossed out]. He is quite lame. Mrs Smith says that the doctor gives little hope of his recovery.

I must now conclude for my candle is nearly burned out and I cannot get another. Be sure that you write me a very long letter by the next opportunity. Goodnight dear and believe me to remain


Ever your affectionate
Susan Douglas Strang

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0827 (34 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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