Object #1008302 from MS-Papers-0032-0828

5 pages written Oct 1861 by Susan Douglas McLean to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0828 (82 digitised items). The letters from Donald are written from Porirua Barracks, Otaki, Rangitikei, Waikanae, Wanganui and Taranaki. Susan's letters are addressed from Dalmuir Hill (her parent's home) and Wellington Terrace. Many letters are undated and were written prior to their marriage in Aug 1851. Includes correspondence between Susan McLean and her mother Susan Strang (2 letters, undated); one letter from Helen Anne Wilson to Mrs McLean, 30 August 1852

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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Page 1 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (MD)




My dearest Donald

The Dane has my letter which I wrote on Saturday but as he is not going till tomorrow I have yet another opportunity of writing to my darling husband. The Dane told Papa that you had dreadful weather after you left. How very unfortunate it was the day you left was so fine that I felt sure that weather would continue good and when I awoke the next morning

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English (MD)

days. It is a dreadful thought to me dearest but I fear that I will soon lose my dearest mother. O my husband how am I to bear this loss. I constantly pray that God in His mercy will grant me strength and resignation to submit to His will and I trust it will be granted to me. If you were only here to comfort me but I cannot give up hope. I trust that she may yet be spared to me. Dr Featherstone says that if we have fine weather and Mama could get out a little in the air she may yet get well. I try to comfort myself with this thought but Donald

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English (MD)

is it not dreadful to think that my darling mother is in danger. I fear my dear Donald when you hear that Mama is so ill you will get very anxious. I should not have mentioned it had I not felt sure that you would hear of it some other way. There is one thing which I entreat you my dear husband not to do. Do not, as you value your wife's happiness, risk your life in a vessel or fatigue yourself by hurrying overland as I am afraid in your anxiety for

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English (MD)

me you may do so. Do not then risk your life. If I were to hear that you were coming in a vessel I would be perfectly miserable and it might do me great suffering but I need say no more. I feel certain that you will take care of yourself for my sake. Do not feel any anxiety for me whatever trials our Heavenly Father may see fit to send me. I know he will give me strength to bear them all. On him I place all my reliance and He will never forsake those who put their whole trust in him. Do not then dearest be afraid for me when you know that I am in God's protection you have nothing to fear. I must now conclude for it is late. May every blessing be with you and believe me my dearest Donald.


Your ever affectionate wife
Susan D McLean

Monday evening
[ca Oct 1851]

English (MD)




My dearest Donald

The Dane has my letter which I wrote on Saturday but as he is not going till tomorrow I have yet another opportunity of writing to my darling husband. The Dane told Papa that you had dreadful weather after you left. How very unfortunate it was the day you left was so fine that I felt sure that weather would continue good and when I awoke the next morning and found it raining I wished so much that you had not gone for I am always so afraid that you take rheumatism and I would be so miserable if you were ill away from me for I know that no person however kind they were to you could supply the place of your wife. I trust my own love that you will never expose yourself to cold or night air. Remember that all my happiness in this world is placed on you. I shall be so delighted to hear of your safe arrival at the East Coast for I am very anxious about you. You will say perhaps that I am foolish to be anxious but you know darling how deeply I am attached to you and you cannot wonder that I am so much afraid that you will injure your health.

I am now staying with Mama. It was indeed most kind in Mrs Paul to allow her servant to sleep at our house so that I might remain with dear Mama. I feel now much more easy in my mind since I am always with her. I trust my dear husband that my health may be spared to pay her all the attention in my power. She is dreadfully changed within the last few days. It is a dreadful thought to me dearest but I fear that I will soon lose my dearest mother. O my husband how am I to bear this loss. I constantly pray that God in His mercy will grant me strength and resignation to submit to His will and I trust it will be granted to me. If you were only here to comfort me but I cannot give up hope. I trust that she may yet be spared to me. Dr Featherstone says that if we have fine weather and Mama could get out a little in the air she may yet get well. I try to comfort myself with this thought but Donald is it not dreadful to think that my darling mother is in danger. I fear my dear Donald when you hear that Mama is so ill you will get very anxious. I should not have mentioned it had I not felt sure that you would hear of it some other way. There is one thing which I entreat you my dear husband not to do. Do not, as you value your wife's happiness, risk your life in a vessel or fatigue yourself by hurrying overland as I am afraid in your anxiety for me you may do so. Do not then risk your life. If I were to hear that you were coming in a vessel I would be perfectly miserable and it might do me great suffering but I need say no more. I feel certain that you will take care of yourself for my sake. Do not feel any anxiety for me whatever trials our Heavenly Father may see fit to send me. I know he will give me strength to bear them all. On him I place all my reliance and He will never forsake those who put their whole trust in him. Do not then dearest be afraid for me when you know that I am in God's protection you have nothing to fear. I must now conclude for it is late. May every blessing be with you and believe me my dearest Donald.


Your ever affectionate wife
Susan D McLean

Monday evening
[ca Oct 1851]

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0828 (82 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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