Object #1007515 from MS-Papers-0032-0657

3 pages written 29 Mar 1863 by George Tovey Buckland Worgan to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - G Worgan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0657 (12 digitised items). 11 letters written from Wairoa, Napier and Wellington, 1863-1876

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

March 29th. 1863


My dear Sir,

I regret very much that I had not the pleasure of seeing you before my departure for the country, but you were so engaged with a number of people that I was reluctant to disturb you. I trust I may be permitted to say without presumption, that your expositions of measures for colonial advancement, meets with my entire and cordial approval for the first time since Hawkes Bay was a province, we have a distinct and well digested scheme, of policy, which I hope you will firmly adhere tom despite of any amount of opposition, or factious cavilling that may be directed against it.

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English (ATL)

In respect of the senseless and narrowminded cry which (without knowing the details) has already been raised against the immagration of a body of Germans it can well be replied to by showing that the benefit will be immediate and the cost small. Moreover, it does not by any means preclude the introduction of English, or other immigrants as to the advantages of the loan the benefit is so obvious that we have before our eyes the fact of the continued increase of the material prosperity of our native land pari passu with the growth of the public debt. I need not say that what ever humble support I can render with either my tongue or pen will be given heartily to the furtherance of such undeniably valuable issues. I must now my dear Sir apologise for the following reference to my personal affairs. The truth is, we are come to a deadlock, and it is imperative that I shaid do something to obtain a decent living for myself and wife. At present I have not the means to take myself away and start me in another Province, beyond which I am very much attached to poor H. B. and cannot but indulge in the hope that as one of the pioneer settlers in the province that some birth might be found for me, in the carrying out of these new institutions, where the qualities of diligence intelligence and in tegrity, superadded to long

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English (ATL)

experience, might be found serviceable Pray do not think me egotistical in thus writing but when I see the persons of all kinds that have gotten appointments, I find it hard to be overlooked, that even the poor compliment was paid me after discharging the duties of Coroner for Waipukeraushire for three years, of making me a J.P. I have too high an opinion of your generosity to believe that you will be slack to serve me upon the worldly principle of only giving appointments to those who really do not need them. I will not nore you more on this subject but will conclude with entreating your kind consideration of my unfortunate position, and your good offices, in procuring me some appointment, when an opportunity presents itself.

I beg to remain my Dear Sir,
very sincerely yours,
G. Worgan.

English (ATL)

March 29th. 1863


My dear Sir,

I regret very much that I had not the pleasure of seeing you before my departure for the country, but you were so engaged with a number of people that I was reluctant to disturb you. I trust I may be permitted to say without presumption, that your expositions of measures for colonial advancement, meets with my entire and cordial approval for the first time since Hawkes Bay was a province, we have a distinct and well digested scheme, of policy, which I hope you will firmly adhere tom despite of any amount of opposition, or factious cavilling that may be directed against it. In respect of the senseless and narrowminded cry which (without knowing the details) has already been raised against the immagration of a body of Germans it can well be replied to by showing that the benefit will be immediate and the cost small. Moreover, it does not by any means preclude the introduction of English, or other immigrants as to the advantages of the loan the benefit is so obvious that we have before our eyes the fact of the continued increase of the material prosperity of our native land pari passu with the growth of the public debt. I need not say that what ever humble support I can render with either my tongue or pen will be given heartily to the furtherance of such undeniably valuable issues. I must now my dear Sir apologise for the following reference to my personal affairs. The truth is, we are come to a deadlock, and it is imperative that I shaid do something to obtain a decent living for myself and wife. At present I have not the means to take myself away and start me in another Province, beyond which I am very much attached to poor H. B. and cannot but indulge in the hope that as one of the pioneer settlers in the province that some birth might be found for me, in the carrying out of these new institutions, where the qualities of diligence intelligence and in tegrity, superadded to long experience, might be found serviceable Pray do not think me egotistical in thus writing but when I see the persons of all kinds that have gotten appointments, I find it hard to be overlooked, that even the poor compliment was paid me after discharging the duties of Coroner for Waipukeraushire for three years, of making me a J.P. I have too high an opinion of your generosity to believe that you will be slack to serve me upon the worldly principle of only giving appointments to those who really do not need them. I will not nore you more on this subject but will conclude with entreating your kind consideration of my unfortunate position, and your good offices, in procuring me some appointment, when an opportunity presents itself.

I beg to remain my Dear Sir,
very sincerely yours,
G. Worgan.

Part of:
Inward letters - G Worgan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0657 (12 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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