Object #1007189 from MS-Papers-0032-0276

5 pages written 27 Jul 1856 by Josiah Flight in Te Henui to Sir Donald McLean in Auckland Region

From: Inward letters - Josiah Flight, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0276 (45 digitised items). 43 letters addressed from Mangoraka, Te Ika Moana, Resident Magistrate's Office, New Plymouth, Henui, 1846-1872, and undated. Also letter from A D Flight, 6 Mar [187-], New Plymouth to Sir Donald McLean; letter from Josiah Flight to Thomas Kelly, 22 Jul 1870 re Cape Egmont Flax CompanyAlso poem addressed to `My dear Donald McLean' entitled `No Land' (on verso) written by Josiah Flight

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Henui,
27th. July, 1856.


My dear Sir,

I am very glad to see by the leading article in the "New Zealander" that the General Assembly have been interesting themselves about Native affairs, and have passed a Bill for the management of lands set apart for the benefits of the aboriginal natives of New Zealand. If I read that article aright and if the Editor understands correctly the reading of that Act, it appears to me one likely to be very useful provided the Commissions to be formed under its power be filled with the right men. The duties they will have to perform are such as to require that at least one of them in each of the Commissions should

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English (ATL)

be a man well acquainted with the Maori language; understanding thoroughly their habits, manners, and customs; possessing information on the subject of their holdings, occupations and other rights connected with land both as regards themselves individually or in come munity as tribes. Amongst Europeans there are very few who possess the necessary qualifications. The Missionarys, those who have long resided in the Islands are the most likely to possess them; and I need not to you say that no one more so than Mr. Turton. He is now owing to certain arrangements of the Wesleyan Conference placed in a situation where he must choose between a return to England or withdrawing from the Wesleyan Missionay connexion in these parts. Could he be induced to accept a situation as one of the Commissioners I think he would bring his talents (which you know how to appreciate) to bear on the work for which they are to be called into being, in a way that would tend greatly to their efficiency; whilst he would feel he was still carrying on that great work for which he first came to New Zealand. You will I think agree with me that such a man should be kept in this country if possible, and by putting him in his right place enable him to carry out the best feelings of his heart by labouring for the benefit of the native population.

I would here take the liberty of enquiring whether you have been able to give

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English (ATL)

any of your time and attention to the starting of a subscription for a testimonial of respect to and regard for Mr. Turton?

You will I an sure sympathize with us in the loss of our friend Mrs. Devenish who from the effect of a fall she had on Thursday last which shook her before weakened frame and so completely prostrated all the functions of her body that she did not again rally and died on Saturday. Poor Mr. Hood's friends are daily looking for his death, though his attenuated frame still tabernacles his better self. He is I am informed quite resigned; and is I trust looking peacefully forward to the conclusion of his journey when his heavenly parent shall receive him to his eternal home.

Mr. H. Halse I know has informed you of every particular concerning the Native affairs in this district. When shall these unhappy quarrels cease?

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English (ATL)

When will a superior power, the strong voice of a beneficial government, be able to speak out an that the whole native population shall not only hear but attend to the command "Peace be still"? Disputes about land ought to be settled in some other way than the sanguinary one now taken by our native population and a true philanthropy calls loudly on us to spare its decreasing number by making them in reality British subjects. Mrs. Flight and my daughters desire to be very kindly remembered to you.


Believe me ever yours very faithfully,
Josiah Flight.
D. Mclean Esq.Auckland

English (ATL)

Henui,
27th. July, 1856.


My dear Sir,

I am very glad to see by the leading article in the "New Zealander" that the General Assembly have been interesting themselves about Native affairs, and have passed a Bill for the management of lands set apart for the benefits of the aboriginal natives of New Zealand. If I read that article aright and if the Editor understands correctly the reading of that Act, it appears to me one likely to be very useful provided the Commissions to be formed under its power be filled with the right men. The duties they will have to perform are such as to require that at least one of them in each of the Commissions should be a man well acquainted with the Maori language; understanding thoroughly their habits, manners, and customs; possessing information on the subject of their holdings, occupations and other rights connected with land both as regards themselves individually or in come munity as tribes. Amongst Europeans there are very few who possess the necessary qualifications. The Missionarys, those who have long resided in the Islands are the most likely to possess them; and I need not to you say that no one more so than Mr. Turton. He is now owing to certain arrangements of the Wesleyan Conference placed in a situation where he must choose between a return to England or withdrawing from the Wesleyan Missionay connexion in these parts. Could he be induced to accept a situation as one of the Commissioners I think he would bring his talents (which you know how to appreciate) to bear on the work for which they are to be called into being, in a way that would tend greatly to their efficiency; whilst he would feel he was still carrying on that great work for which he first came to New Zealand. You will I think agree with me that such a man should be kept in this country if possible, and by putting him in his right place enable him to carry out the best feelings of his heart by labouring for the benefit of the native population.

I would here take the liberty of enquiring whether you have been able to give any of your time and attention to the starting of a subscription for a testimonial of respect to and regard for Mr. Turton?

You will I an sure sympathize with us in the loss of our friend Mrs. Devenish who from the effect of a fall she had on Thursday last which shook her before weakened frame and so completely prostrated all the functions of her body that she did not again rally and died on Saturday. Poor Mr. Hood's friends are daily looking for his death, though his attenuated frame still tabernacles his better self. He is I am informed quite resigned; and is I trust looking peacefully forward to the conclusion of his journey when his heavenly parent shall receive him to his eternal home.

Mr. H. Halse I know has informed you of every particular concerning the Native affairs in this district. When shall these unhappy quarrels cease? When will a superior power, the strong voice of a beneficial government, be able to speak out an that the whole native population shall not only hear but attend to the command "Peace be still"? Disputes about land ought to be settled in some other way than the sanguinary one now taken by our native population and a true philanthropy calls loudly on us to spare its decreasing number by making them in reality British subjects. Mrs. Flight and my daughters desire to be very kindly remembered to you.


Believe me ever yours very faithfully,
Josiah Flight.
D. Mclean Esq.Auckland

Part of:
Inward letters - Josiah Flight, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0276 (45 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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