Object #1007075 from MS-Papers-0032-0312

4 pages written 10 Jul 1857 by Henry Halse in New Plymouth District

From: Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0312 (49 digitised items). 43 letters written from New Plymouth and Huatoki. Includes copies of letters from Wiremu Kingi, Witi, and Aperahama, Te Kani, 1851

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Private.
Dear Sir,

The ship "Stateley" arrived here yesterday with 1 passenger. Mr. B. White, our old settler, and goods for this place which should be called neutral ground. She brings news of the wreck of a French frigate, northward of Hokianga and the loss of 14 lives, the rest of the ships company being in Auckland waiting an opportunity to return to their country - this is all I have heard relative to an accident everyone must deplore and is supposed to be the cause of a special arrival this afternoon of an Auckland native Policeman named Penebsmene with despatches for the Governor in Chief - to be taken on tomorrow morning by T. Heale, whose orders are to proceed to Wellington.

White tells me that 14 passengers who left England for this settlement were induced to stay at Auckland in consequence of the following serious array of potent reasons - no harbour -

Page 2 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

no land - no protection - pleasant truisms to digest after a bad dinner resulting in an aggravated might-mare and a prodigious headache on the following morning - seriously it is a grave subject for bona fide settlers to dwell upon - spero meliora - but I question whether I shall see them in this settlement.

A party of Taranaki natives headed by friend Paora Kukutai and Hori Ngatairakaunui arrived this afternoon and marched to the Kawau, where they remain for the night, that is to say, if accommodation can be found for 400 men, armed with 20 guns rather impoverished for want of attention - if the dusky gentlemen generally could not boast of better war instruments and a brush took place between the races it would soon be a case of sauve-qui-peut with them - they are here, to inquire into a case of puremu or moepuku between Parata junior and one of their tribe,

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English (ATL)

which investigation will surely end in a general feast.

After a long absence John Medland found his way to the Police Office last Monday and has been there since for 2 or 3 hours a day - he has thought it quite unnecessary to come near me in accordance with standing orders during your absence, and, with the exception of what I have said has done nothing in his capacity as a Policeman during the recent beautiful weather. In wet weather I expect nothing from him, but during fine dry seasons the least he can do, is to extend his walk as far as the Barracks - we live in strange times indeed - and I consider it a desirable to observe silence, hoping soon to see you when existing abuses will be swept away and discipline again established.


Yours very faithfully,
H. Halse.

New Plymouth,

July 10th. 1857.


Page 4 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

P.S. The "Stateley" will probably sail tomorrow. At Heale's request I have noted on the cover of this letter the time he started, and hope he will not attempt to accomplish more than his advanced condition will admit - however he leaves by the R.M.'s order not mine - by the way I have advanced him £2 - the sum he asked. H.H.

English (ATL)

Private.
Dear Sir,

The ship "Stateley" arrived here yesterday with 1 passenger. Mr. B. White, our old settler, and goods for this place which should be called neutral ground. She brings news of the wreck of a French frigate, northward of Hokianga and the loss of 14 lives, the rest of the ships company being in Auckland waiting an opportunity to return to their country - this is all I have heard relative to an accident everyone must deplore and is supposed to be the cause of a special arrival this afternoon of an Auckland native Policeman named Penebsmene with despatches for the Governor in Chief - to be taken on tomorrow morning by T. Heale, whose orders are to proceed to Wellington.

White tells me that 14 passengers who left England for this settlement were induced to stay at Auckland in consequence of the following serious array of potent reasons - no harbour - no land - no protection - pleasant truisms to digest after a bad dinner resulting in an aggravated might-mare and a prodigious headache on the following morning - seriously it is a grave subject for bona fide settlers to dwell upon - spero meliora - but I question whether I shall see them in this settlement.

A party of Taranaki natives headed by friend Paora Kukutai and Hori Ngatairakaunui arrived this afternoon and marched to the Kawau, where they remain for the night, that is to say, if accommodation can be found for 400 men, armed with 20 guns rather impoverished for want of attention - if the dusky gentlemen generally could not boast of better war instruments and a brush took place between the races it would soon be a case of sauve-qui-peut with them - they are here, to inquire into a case of puremu or moepuku between Parata junior and one of their tribe, which investigation will surely end in a general feast.

After a long absence John Medland found his way to the Police Office last Monday and has been there since for 2 or 3 hours a day - he has thought it quite unnecessary to come near me in accordance with standing orders during your absence, and, with the exception of what I have said has done nothing in his capacity as a Policeman during the recent beautiful weather. In wet weather I expect nothing from him, but during fine dry seasons the least he can do, is to extend his walk as far as the Barracks - we live in strange times indeed - and I consider it a desirable to observe silence, hoping soon to see you when existing abuses will be swept away and discipline again established.


Yours very faithfully,
H. Halse.

New Plymouth,

July 10th. 1857.


P.S. The "Stateley" will probably sail tomorrow. At Heale's request I have noted on the cover of this letter the time he started, and hope he will not attempt to accomplish more than his advanced condition will admit - however he leaves by the R.M.'s order not mine - by the way I have advanced him £2 - the sum he asked. H.H.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0312 (49 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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