Object #1006890 from MS-Papers-0032-0374

5 pages written 30 Jul 1850 by William Cutfield King in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry King, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0374 (73 digitised items). 71 letters written from Taranaki - Police Office, Brooklands & New Plymouth

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Brooklands

30th. July 1850.



My dear Mr. McLean,

Hunter and myself arrived here on Saturday evening July 20th. Our journey was rather a rough one, from the rain, which flooded some of the rivers, and delayed us more than once. The horse came along very well, but the pack was continually shifting, galling the horse's back, and gave us no end of trouble. Still, with all our disadvantages, the bridle track was not nearly so difficult as I expected.

The "Poictiers", of whose arrival Mr. Halse has no doubt informed you, brought a very fair batch of cabin passengers. One or two

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English (ATL)

of them have some little money. Two of the late arrivals, Messrs. Adams and Worsley, have taken Mr. Faithful's land for a term of years; and Mr. Greenwood has, I hear, taken Newsham's section at Omata, and purchased the old Barracks from him.

All this looks well; and Taranaki seems to be progressing more surely, and upon a firmer basis; though perhaps also more slowly then the rest of the New Zealand settlements.

Mr. Horn has left Mrs. Bolland's old house, and taken the one adjoining the parsonage. He is in no better repute as a doctor than when you left.

I have been busy about the cattle ever since my return. The remainder of four cattle left on the Omata Run have just been taken to Tataraimaka; for the unfenced

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English (ATL)

cultivations about Omata are now becoming numerous; and whenever the people living there catch any stock near, they set to and dog them, so that the cattle being driven about from one to the other, have thriven so ill that it is necessary to remove them.

The "Governor Grey" came in yesterday from Wanganui, and I will most probably be able to send this letter on her return. The "Grey" sailed while I was writing the above, so this must go by the Overland Mail.

Should the young Bull be pure Durham, and horned, my Father will have no objection to go as high as Twenty pounds for him, taking for granted that you will make the best bargain you can; and he also desires me to ask you whether the beast is at Wairarapa or Rangitikei,

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English (ATL)

and what would be the best mode of getting him here. My Father has paid Mr. Hoskin the sum of Ten pounds, you were so good as to lend me, believing this will meet your wishes. Mr. Standish informed me that your oath as Magistrate is for the Northern Province only; and I believe Mr. Halse has written you to that effect. My uncle has one of the newcomers, a clergyman's son, by name Bishop, living at Tatori for board and lodging, to get some insight into Stock keeping; and another gentleman, of the name of Broughton, who has been in the India Service, is living with John Smith, on the same terms. My Father will write you by the next mail; and in the meantime, desires me to tell you, that E Waka still asserts the disputed spot of land in Major Lloyd's

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English (ATL)


section at Omata, was reserved for him by you. I hope you will, in no very long time, return to Taranaki; and be sure we shall be very glad to see you. All here join in kind remembrances to you. Please remember me to all Wanganui friends, and believe me,


Faithfully yours (Signed)
W.C. King.
To:- Donald McLean Esq.

English (ATL)

Brooklands

30th. July 1850.



My dear Mr. McLean,

Hunter and myself arrived here on Saturday evening July 20th. Our journey was rather a rough one, from the rain, which flooded some of the rivers, and delayed us more than once. The horse came along very well, but the pack was continually shifting, galling the horse's back, and gave us no end of trouble. Still, with all our disadvantages, the bridle track was not nearly so difficult as I expected.

The "Poictiers", of whose arrival Mr. Halse has no doubt informed you, brought a very fair batch of cabin passengers. One or two of them have some little money. Two of the late arrivals, Messrs. Adams and Worsley, have taken Mr. Faithful's land for a term of years; and Mr. Greenwood has, I hear, taken Newsham's section at Omata, and purchased the old Barracks from him.

All this looks well; and Taranaki seems to be progressing more surely, and upon a firmer basis; though perhaps also more slowly then the rest of the New Zealand settlements.

Mr. Horn has left Mrs. Bolland's old house, and taken the one adjoining the parsonage. He is in no better repute as a doctor than when you left.

I have been busy about the cattle ever since my return. The remainder of four cattle left on the Omata Run have just been taken to Tataraimaka; for the unfenced cultivations about Omata are now becoming numerous; and whenever the people living there catch any stock near, they set to and dog them, so that the cattle being driven about from one to the other, have thriven so ill that it is necessary to remove them.

The "Governor Grey" came in yesterday from Wanganui, and I will most probably be able to send this letter on her return. The "Grey" sailed while I was writing the above, so this must go by the Overland Mail.

Should the young Bull be pure Durham, and horned, my Father will have no objection to go as high as Twenty pounds for him, taking for granted that you will make the best bargain you can; and he also desires me to ask you whether the beast is at Wairarapa or Rangitikei, and what would be the best mode of getting him here. My Father has paid Mr. Hoskin the sum of Ten pounds, you were so good as to lend me, believing this will meet your wishes. Mr. Standish informed me that your oath as Magistrate is for the Northern Province only; and I believe Mr. Halse has written you to that effect. My uncle has one of the newcomers, a clergyman's son, by name Bishop, living at Tatori for board and lodging, to get some insight into Stock keeping; and another gentleman, of the name of Broughton, who has been in the India Service, is living with John Smith, on the same terms. My Father will write you by the next mail; and in the meantime, desires me to tell you, that E Waka still asserts the disputed spot of land in Major Lloyd's

section at Omata, was reserved for him by you. I hope you will, in no very long time, return to Taranaki; and be sure we shall be very glad to see you. All here join in kind remembrances to you. Please remember me to all Wanganui friends, and believe me,


Faithfully yours (Signed)
W.C. King.
To:- Donald McLean Esq.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry King, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0374 (73 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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