Object #1006756 from MS-Papers-0032-0815

3 pages written 20 Dec 1860 by Alexander McLean in Maraekakaho to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Alexander McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0815 (48 digitised items). Letters written from Napier and Maraekakaho mainly about station matters. Includes one letter from Canterbury, Jul 1861, and one from Ashburton, Sep 1868

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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English (MD)

20 Dec 1860

Maraekakaho

My dear brother

I have not heard from you for a long time. It makes me uneasy but I hope you are well. We have fearfull bad weather hear since I wrote you last. We had not tow fine days since we comenced shearing. I have about 8 or 9 hundred to do but the weather so wet that I was obblidged to leave them till January when I hope the weather will take up. I am afraid the wooll will be a great deal lighter this year. The fleeces don't weigh near so heavey owing to the severe winter last year. The wooll is ready. What is to be done with it this year. I suppose it will go to Wellington.

I have about 80 tons of hay and am afraid shall lose the most of the seed this wet weather. Three days rain now without stoping. The most of the hay is in good rucks [?].

In the hurey of my shearing I was summoned to atend the court at Napier for breaking the Native Land Purchase Ordinance. I went with the intension of admiting that the sheep were on native land sometimes and that it was impossible for me to keep them of as their was no natureall boundary between the native land and the land I depastured the sheep on.

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English (MD)


I left home at six in the evening before the court and got to Napier at 9 o'clock next morning. I saw Curling, Ferguson, Capt MacGregor, the three JP that was to sit on my case being the first case to be tried. I told them that I would admit and that I supposed the fine would be five pounds and that I would pay. Curling, Ferguson, MacGregor told it was a wrong time to for Tom to bring aney of those cases on and that it was their oppinion that I should have a longer to conduct my case. I told that I did not wish to have a lawyer. The reply was he is allready engaged on your case for he told me so said Curling and my firm oppinion if you are fined it will be 50 or £100. So by having Allan he will get you clear and all the cases will go to the wall as it is the wish of all the people in the district. I went to Allen. I told him not to mension aney names except my own in the case. For want of proof of ownership to the sheep the case was dismised and my expences paid but Tom was not idle. He got a fresh summons out for you and for the shepherds on

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English (MD)

for the 29 January. The summons was left hear Curling give time so that I might correspond with you and that in the event other cases might be tried in that time or the whole affair droped for the present. What is to be done. Let me hear as soon as possible but I am in hopes you will be hear by that time. If I had my own way I would have paid the fine sooner than have you taken in the court but if I went against all the rest they might be angry and mad[e] my case worth [worse]. In hopes to hear or se you soon. With my love to Douglas.


Yours allways
Alexander McLean

English (MD)

20 Dec 1860

Maraekakaho

My dear brother

I have not heard from you for a long time. It makes me uneasy but I hope you are well. We have fearfull bad weather hear since I wrote you last. We had not tow fine days since we comenced shearing. I have about 8 or 9 hundred to do but the weather so wet that I was obblidged to leave them till January when I hope the weather will take up. I am afraid the wooll will be a great deal lighter this year. The fleeces don't weigh near so heavey owing to the severe winter last year. The wooll is ready. What is to be done with it this year. I suppose it will go to Wellington.

I have about 80 tons of hay and am afraid shall lose the most of the seed this wet weather. Three days rain now without stoping. The most of the hay is in good rucks [?].

In the hurey of my shearing I was summoned to atend the court at Napier for breaking the Native Land Purchase Ordinance. I went with the intension of admiting that the sheep were on native land sometimes and that it was impossible for me to keep them of as their was no natureall boundary between the native land and the land I depastured the sheep on.

I left home at six in the evening before the court and got to Napier at 9 o'clock next morning. I saw Curling, Ferguson, Capt MacGregor, the three JP that was to sit on my case being the first case to be tried. I told them that I would admit and that I supposed the fine would be five pounds and that I would pay. Curling, Ferguson, MacGregor told it was a wrong time to for Tom to bring aney of those cases on and that it was their oppinion that I should have a longer to conduct my case. I told that I did not wish to have a lawyer. The reply was he is allready engaged on your case for he told me so said Curling and my firm oppinion if you are fined it will be 50 or £100. So by having Allan he will get you clear and all the cases will go to the wall as it is the wish of all the people in the district. I went to Allen. I told him not to mension aney names except my own in the case. For want of proof of ownership to the sheep the case was dismised and my expences paid but Tom was not idle. He got a fresh summons out for you and for the shepherds on for the 29 January. The summons was left hear Curling give time so that I might correspond with you and that in the event other cases might be tried in that time or the whole affair droped for the present. What is to be done. Let me hear as soon as possible but I am in hopes you will be hear by that time. If I had my own way I would have paid the fine sooner than have you taken in the court but if I went against all the rest they might be angry and mad[e] my case worth [worse]. In hopes to hear or se you soon. With my love to Douglas.


Yours allways
Alexander McLean

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Alexander McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0815 (48 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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