Object #1006724 from MS-Papers-0032-0827

5 pages written 14 Sep 1851 by Susan Douglas McLean in Wellington to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0827 (34 digitised items). Letters between Donald McLean and Susan. Donald's letters written from Hawke's Bay, Rangitikei, Taita and Wairapapa. Susan's letters from Dalmuir Hill, Wellington (the home of her parents (Robert and Susannah Strang).

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

Download alow-resolution PDF or high-resolution PDF

Page 1 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

January 4th 1851

Dalmuir Hill

My dear Mr McLean

Papa told me this morning that the vessel had not yet sailed and that if I wished to write to you again I would have time as it is not going before Monday. I shall therefore, before I go to bed, sit down and write a few lines to you.

My cold was better on

Page 2 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

Tuesday so I went to the dance at Government House. It was a very pleasant party. Mama did not go as she had a bad cold. We did not stay late. Everyone left before two o'clock which was quite late enough.

I was surprised to see Mr Swainson from Auckland at the party for I did not hear that he was in Wellington. He had come down a few days before overland. It is strange he had not recognised me. He did not know I was there till Papa told him and he then came and spoke to me. I must be very much changed since I was in Auckland. I suppose I look older. This accounts for you thinking I was a very young girl when you first saw me three years ago.

Mrs Stokes told me yesterday that she heard that you would not be back for two or three months. Surely dear you will not be away so long. I would not complain if I heard from you every week as I did before but I cannot help feeling your absence now as

Page 3 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

I so seldom have a letter however if you cannot return home I must try and bear it with patience.

We are thinking of going to Porirua on Tuesday with Mr & Miss Hart and Miss Kelly are going with us. We shall remain all night as it would be impossible to go and return the same days. I have seen a good deal of Miss Hart. She is exceedingly pleasant in her manner and I think she is very clever and well educated. I do not think

Page 4 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

I mentioned in the letter which I wrote last week that Mr Park has been very ill. He had a severe fit of paralysis about three weeks ago but I am happy to say that he is very much better. You told me before you went away that you wished me to read Robertson's 'History of Charles the Fifth'. I intend to do so. I have nearly read the whole of the 'View of the State of Europe' so you see I am very obedient. When you write to me again will you tell

Page 5 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

me when you think I may see you when you return you must make up your mind to remain till my birthday for I am determined I will not allow you to leave me before. I cannot believe that in less than three months I shall be twenty three. I am really getting very old.

I must now conclude. I would like to continue writing to you for it is the greatest pleasure I have but it is very late and it is time I was in bed. Mama sends her kindest regards. Good night dear and believe me ever to remain


Your affectionate
Susan D Strang

I have found braid at last for a watch guard. I shall have it made by the time you return. I suppose the silk one is nearly worn out.

[Notes on transcription: 'History of the Reign of Charles the Fifth', written in 1769 by William Robertson (1721-1793). 'The View of the State of Europe during the Middle Ages', written in 1818 by Henry Hallam (1777-1859).]


English (MD)

January 4th 1851

Dalmuir Hill

My dear Mr McLean

Papa told me this morning that the vessel had not yet sailed and that if I wished to write to you again I would have time as it is not going before Monday. I shall therefore, before I go to bed, sit down and write a few lines to you.

My cold was better on Tuesday so I went to the dance at Government House. It was a very pleasant party. Mama did not go as she had a bad cold. We did not stay late. Everyone left before two o'clock which was quite late enough.

I was surprised to see Mr Swainson from Auckland at the party for I did not hear that he was in Wellington. He had come down a few days before overland. It is strange he had not recognised me. He did not know I was there till Papa told him and he then came and spoke to me. I must be very much changed since I was in Auckland. I suppose I look older. This accounts for you thinking I was a very young girl when you first saw me three years ago.

Mrs Stokes told me yesterday that she heard that you would not be back for two or three months. Surely dear you will not be away so long. I would not complain if I heard from you every week as I did before but I cannot help feeling your absence now as I so seldom have a letter however if you cannot return home I must try and bear it with patience.

We are thinking of going to Porirua on Tuesday with Mr & Miss Hart and Miss Kelly are going with us. We shall remain all night as it would be impossible to go and return the same days. I have seen a good deal of Miss Hart. She is exceedingly pleasant in her manner and I think she is very clever and well educated. I do not think I mentioned in the letter which I wrote last week that Mr Park has been very ill. He had a severe fit of paralysis about three weeks ago but I am happy to say that he is very much better. You told me before you went away that you wished me to read Robertson's 'History of Charles the Fifth'. I intend to do so. I have nearly read the whole of the 'View of the State of Europe' so you see I am very obedient. When you write to me again will you tell me when you think I may see you when you return you must make up your mind to remain till my birthday for I am determined I will not allow you to leave me before. I cannot believe that in less than three months I shall be twenty three. I am really getting very old.

I must now conclude. I would like to continue writing to you for it is the greatest pleasure I have but it is very late and it is time I was in bed. Mama sends her kindest regards. Good night dear and believe me ever to remain


Your affectionate
Susan D Strang

I have found braid at last for a watch guard. I shall have it made by the time you return. I suppose the silk one is nearly worn out.

[Notes on transcription: 'History of the Reign of Charles the Fifth', written in 1769 by William Robertson (1721-1793). 'The View of the State of Europe during the Middle Ages', written in 1818 by Henry Hallam (1777-1859).]


Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0827 (34 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

Usage: You can search, browse, print and download items from this website for research and personal study. You are welcome to reproduce the above image(s) on your blog or another website, but please maintain the integrity of the image (i.e. don't crop, recolour or overprint it), reproduce the image's caption information and link back to here (http://mp.natlib.govt.nz/detail/?id=1006724). If you would like to use the above image(s) in a different way (e.g. in a print publication), or use the transcription or translation, permission must be obtained. More information about copyright and usage can be found on the Copyright and Usage page of the NLNZ web site.

External Links:
View Full Descriptive Record in TAPUHI

Leave a comment

This function is coming soon.

Latest comments