Object #1006610 from MS-Papers-0032-0158

4 pages written 5 Dec 1862 by Sir Francis Dillon Bell in Auckland Region to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Francis Dillon Bell, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0158 (46 digitised items). Contains correspondence between McLean and F D Bell, and Bell and William Fox; the correspondence covers the purchase of Maori land (especially at Wairarapa), fighting in the New Zealand Wars, politics (including information about the formation of Governments in the 1870s), and personal matters. 47 letters written from Taranaki, Wellington, London, Shag Valley, Wanganui, Dunedin, Melbourne, 1847-1853

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Auckland
Decr. 5, 1862


My dear McLean
,

Many thanks for your letters which came duly to hand. It will be a great favour to me if you will continue to write - never mind if only a few lines - as to what is going on. This is a sad business about Hapuku and the girl - and I write to you officially, after a conversation with Sir George Grey, requesting you to make an enquiry into the circumstances on the Governor's behalf and report to him through this office. I mentioned to the Governor that perhaps Russell might be hurt at anything being done by you - but Sir George said that could hardly be, as Te

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English (ATL)

Hapuku being a Government Officer himself it would be better on all accounts that an enquiry should be made by some other officer than the Civil Commissioners.

Whitmore goes down by this steamer, and I have officially made him the offer to succeed Russell. I am sincerely obliged to the latter for the services he has rendered, but as I told you when you were here, the Govt. felt that it was more fair to give the appointment to some one who would permanently hold it. I have assured Whitmore of your own personal advice & aid, and rely on you to help him - which you can do as no one else can - so he will have the best possible start.

I congratulate you on becoming the

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English (ATL)

purchaser of more country, and hope some day you will found a rich & powerful branch of the clan McLean in them diggins.

As for native affairs here they remain in statu quo. Whaitere of Maniapoto came in the other day with John Hobbs, sent by Matutaera and Rewi to invite the Governor to go to Waikato. So that as Tamehana & Tioriori had already joined in a written invitation, the Governor had a karere tangata as well as pukapuka. Domett & I were with him & advised him to be cautious. He asked Whaitere whether if he went up to Waikato the Kingites would do as he wished. Whaitere said he couldn't answer for that, but at any rate it was better to come. In the end Sir George said that if he

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English (ATL)

saw things quiet & so forth up to March, he would go - & there it rests. Whitmore will tell you all about the little steamer Avon, and the real one we are building at Sydney. All the natives seem anxious about these vessels, but Grey tells them he means to have both on the river.

Nero has urgently renewed his offer of the country between Waitituna and Waipa. After much deliberation we have advised the Governor to buy Nero's claims, so as to stand in the shoes of himself & his people. We think it will serve as a lever to push the Raglan road onwards - of course no survey of boundaries would be attempted till a perfect title were got. Let me know what you think.

My eyes are still very bad. I hope you are really to be Super at H. Bay. Let me have news of you soon and believe me ever


yours truly
F.D. BELL

English (ATL)

Auckland
Decr. 5, 1862


My dear McLean
,

Many thanks for your letters which came duly to hand. It will be a great favour to me if you will continue to write - never mind if only a few lines - as to what is going on. This is a sad business about Hapuku and the girl - and I write to you officially, after a conversation with Sir George Grey, requesting you to make an enquiry into the circumstances on the Governor's behalf and report to him through this office. I mentioned to the Governor that perhaps Russell might be hurt at anything being done by you - but Sir George said that could hardly be, as Te Hapuku being a Government Officer himself it would be better on all accounts that an enquiry should be made by some other officer than the Civil Commissioners.

Whitmore goes down by this steamer, and I have officially made him the offer to succeed Russell. I am sincerely obliged to the latter for the services he has rendered, but as I told you when you were here, the Govt. felt that it was more fair to give the appointment to some one who would permanently hold it. I have assured Whitmore of your own personal advice & aid, and rely on you to help him - which you can do as no one else can - so he will have the best possible start.

I congratulate you on becoming the purchaser of more country, and hope some day you will found a rich & powerful branch of the clan McLean in them diggins.

As for native affairs here they remain in statu quo. Whaitere of Maniapoto came in the other day with John Hobbs, sent by Matutaera and Rewi to invite the Governor to go to Waikato. So that as Tamehana & Tioriori had already joined in a written invitation, the Governor had a karere tangata as well as pukapuka. Domett & I were with him & advised him to be cautious. He asked Whaitere whether if he went up to Waikato the Kingites would do as he wished. Whaitere said he couldn't answer for that, but at any rate it was better to come. In the end Sir George said that if he saw things quiet & so forth up to March, he would go - & there it rests. Whitmore will tell you all about the little steamer Avon, and the real one we are building at Sydney. All the natives seem anxious about these vessels, but Grey tells them he means to have both on the river.

Nero has urgently renewed his offer of the country between Waitituna and Waipa. After much deliberation we have advised the Governor to buy Nero's claims, so as to stand in the shoes of himself & his people. We think it will serve as a lever to push the Raglan road onwards - of course no survey of boundaries would be attempted till a perfect title were got. Let me know what you think.

My eyes are still very bad. I hope you are really to be Super at H. Bay. Let me have news of you soon and believe me ever


yours truly
F.D. BELL

Part of:
Inward letters - Francis Dillon Bell, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0158 (46 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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