Object #1006240 from MS-Papers-0032-0030

4 pages

From: Native Minister - Administration of native affairs, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0030 (32 digitised items). Includes a letter in Maori with translation for an article in Waka Maori newspaper

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)


Mr. Gillies speech at the Mechanics Institute fully reveals the two objects of his animosity the Loan Policy, and the Native Administration. He very properly acknowledges that the policy of the Government with regard to the loan, to immigration, and to public works is now laid -- and that a vote of the House has effectually quenched even his powers of opposition. Hence it might be reasonably supposed that a mind of such capacity as that of Mr. Gillies could be brought to understand that there is a chance that a series of measures recognized by a majority of as prolific of good to the country, may possibly prove a benefit. Not so however, the contrary is the case; and Mr.Gillies rises more defiant than ever, talks about what he would do were the adopted policy yet before the House, rises more defiant than ever, spurns the idea of success attending Measures disapproved of by him, and rushes snarling into the Arena. He states it will be the duty of representatives to watch over the Expenditure of the loan: of course it will; this is a palpable truism; but we regret to say that to this ''one pennyworth of bread'' there is ''an intolerable quantity of soup'' in the shape of fustian and cucumber after a magnamimous confession of the honesty of all New Zealand politicians he goes on to state his fears that, owing to the weakness of human nature, sons and friends and relations of

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English (ATL)

Ministers will obtain billets, and that the money raised will be squandered on useless officials Mr. Gillies when speaking thus had evidently in mind a series of unuttered syllogisms running somewhat after this fashion ''All New Zealand politicians are honest; I am a New Zealand politician; therefore I am honest'': ''All Governments having the disposal of large sums are apt to waste, if not job; the present Government will have the disposal of large sums; they will therefore waste, if not job''. The corollary to be drawn from the above is evident; there is but one man, devoid of human weakness, on whose incorruptible shoulders should fall the task of carrying out a policy ready found to his hand and of directing the expenditure; and that man is Mr.Gillies.

The loan policy is the scheme of the present Government; it is to be presumed that they saw their way clearly before promulgating it; it is now law; and any Ministry replacing them would be bound to enforce it, with what chances of success we will not say. As then it has to be carried into operation, where is the advantage of removing the workmen who elaborated the machine and entrusting its working to others whose first aim would be to take away a wheel here, cut away a band there and stint the moving power till the whole ended in a general smash. If the measures be good, as affirmed by the House, let the authors reap the credit of them; if bad, let them bear the opprobium. But, for the sake of the Country, let us have no factious opposition which will, for the mere sake of having prophesied truly, only bring on the ruin which Mr. Gillies so lamentably foretells.

English (ATL)


Mr. Gillies speech at the Mechanics Institute fully reveals the two objects of his animosity the Loan Policy, and the Native Administration. He very properly acknowledges that the policy of the Government with regard to the loan, to immigration, and to public works is now laid -- and that a vote of the House has effectually quenched even his powers of opposition. Hence it might be reasonably supposed that a mind of such capacity as that of Mr. Gillies could be brought to understand that there is a chance that a series of measures recognized by a majority of as prolific of good to the country, may possibly prove a benefit. Not so however, the contrary is the case; and Mr.Gillies rises more defiant than ever, talks about what he would do were the adopted policy yet before the House, rises more defiant than ever, spurns the idea of success attending Measures disapproved of by him, and rushes snarling into the Arena. He states it will be the duty of representatives to watch over the Expenditure of the loan: of course it will; this is a palpable truism; but we regret to say that to this ''one pennyworth of bread'' there is ''an intolerable quantity of soup'' in the shape of fustian and cucumber after a magnamimous confession of the honesty of all New Zealand politicians he goes on to state his fears that, owing to the weakness of human nature, sons and friends and relations of Ministers will obtain billets, and that the money raised will be squandered on useless officials Mr. Gillies when speaking thus had evidently in mind a series of unuttered syllogisms running somewhat after this fashion ''All New Zealand politicians are honest; I am a New Zealand politician; therefore I am honest'': ''All Governments having the disposal of large sums are apt to waste, if not job; the present Government will have the disposal of large sums; they will therefore waste, if not job''. The corollary to be drawn from the above is evident; there is but one man, devoid of human weakness, on whose incorruptible shoulders should fall the task of carrying out a policy ready found to his hand and of directing the expenditure; and that man is Mr.Gillies.

The loan policy is the scheme of the present Government; it is to be presumed that they saw their way clearly before promulgating it; it is now law; and any Ministry replacing them would be bound to enforce it, with what chances of success we will not say. As then it has to be carried into operation, where is the advantage of removing the workmen who elaborated the machine and entrusting its working to others whose first aim would be to take away a wheel here, cut away a band there and stint the moving power till the whole ended in a general smash. If the measures be good, as affirmed by the House, let the authors reap the credit of them; if bad, let them bear the opprobium. But, for the sake of the Country, let us have no factious opposition which will, for the mere sake of having prophesied truly, only bring on the ruin which Mr. Gillies so lamentably foretells.

It is pitiable to hear a man of Mr. Gillies' powers talk at random and with such narrow views on a matter of such vital importance to Auckland as the Native Question, that he should lose no opportunity of harping on the same thing, and that, at the same time, while displaying his erroneous ideas he should shew forth his utter ignorance on the whole matter. Let us see what he says. He objects to a flour and sugar policy which tends to drift us into war, and wishes to see the Native office swept away. And what then? Does he indicate any consequences of this wholesale use of the broom? No; but we can; we can tell him that, although we do not constitute ourselves the champions for all the deeds of the Native office, yet that, were it done away with, it would soon be found imperative to establish in its stead some other system of control which would take twenty times the present expendition to set on foot. As for the sugar and flour policy that only exists in the mind of Mr.Gillies who is not given to going about the country and ascertaining the requirements of districts and the truth of the theories propounded to him as facts. He uses merely a worn out claptrap which may go down with people who cannot believe that their Superintendent would intentionally deceive them, but which will not pass muster with any one who has had the opportunity of watching the action of the present Government with respect to Native affairs. Its results are plain. Both Coasts, so lately the scene of strife, are now at peace; settlements abandoned and half ruined two years ago are now once more raising their heads and thriving; the natives instead of thinking of nothing but war, are quieted down and have taken with zeal to honest labour; and our correspondence shews that the settlers and they are living on amicable terms. Is this what Mr. Gillies cals drifting into war? Is not this a more favourable than has been presented for some years past? True, that a little cloud dims the otherwise serene sky; but let Mr. Gillies have his will and do away with the Native office, which merely means stepping into the shoes of the men who have now the confidence of the Maories, the whole horizon will soon be overcast, and a storm be raised which neither he nor his colleagues can face -- he should much like to see the Gilliesian theory for the settlement of the native question, and we cordially concur with the gentleman who remarked that before doing away with the Native Office Mr. Gillies would have to do away with the Maories; there was more truth and wisdom in those few words than in Mr. Gillies whole speech. We do not think the outsettlers will be likely to endorse Mr. Gillies views; for to them peace is a necessity, and they know full well that the advent to office of a meddlesome would be reformer with a pocket full of unbroached theories respecting the Maories would mean but one thing, war without any definite object, and utter ruin to themselves.

It is a pity that after finding fault with everybody and everything and giving vent to a string of platitudes and aphorisms Mr. Gillies should have enuntiated only one article of his policy, and that couched in an old English hustings cry, quite inapplicable to this country. The truth is that he is more opposed to men than to measures; the Colonial Treasurer and the Native Minister act upon him as a red rag does on a bull; they are his ''betes-noires'' whose success and influence have so completely eclipsed him in the House that on his part personal feeling has replaced public rivalry. By returning Mr. Gillies for City Cnl. the electors will send to the House a representative pledged, not so much to look after their interests and the country's, as to fight tooth and nail against every measure, whether for good or for ill, brought in by the present Ministry.

Part of:
Native Minister - Administration of native affairs, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0030 (32 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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