Object #1006171 from MS-Papers-0032-0828

4 pages written 5 Aug 1852 by Susan Douglas McLean in Wellington to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0828 (82 digitised items). The letters from Donald are written from Porirua Barracks, Otaki, Rangitikei, Waikanae, Wanganui and Taranaki. Susan's letters are addressed from Dalmuir Hill (her parent's home) and Wellington Terrace. Many letters are undated and were written prior to their marriage in Aug 1851. Includes correspondence between Susan McLean and her mother Susan Strang (2 letters, undated); one letter from Helen Anne Wilson to Mrs McLean, 30 August 1852

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
Monday August 5th [1852]


My own dearest Donald

I received your letter on Saturday by the overland mail quite unexpectedly as I did not look forward to the pleasure of hearing from my old plague till the arrival of some vessel. I was dreadfully disappointed to hear by your letter to Papa that you could not leave Taranaki for some weeks. How I hate the name of that horrid place. I am sure it has caused me more vexation and annoyance than I can tell. Nothing in the world ever persuade me to go there. It is really dreadful to think that you are to be away so long. I have now given up all hopes of seeing you before my troubles begin. What to do I know not. I dread to think of it. The idea of it made me quite ill on Saturday. To make things worse Mrs Kirton's servant is going to leave and she

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English (MD)

cannot hear of another. I know that she will do all she can for me but it is quite impossible if she has no servant that she can be with me much. Mrs McKenzie is gone to the Hutt and the doctor thinks that I should have some one nearer but I do not like the idea of having a stranger. If you were here darling it would be some comfort as you could keep poor Papa from making himself miserable which I am sure he will be. Do darling try and be in by the end of this month or the first week in September although I am not afraid still no woman can feel certain of recovery and if anything were to happen while you are away how dreadfully you my darling husband would feel it. I trust my dearest that God will spare me for the sake of you and poor Papa and from him I look for strength and support when I shall require it. I shall send this letter by the vessel which is going up. It is possible it may arrive before the Hunter's

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English (MD)

native leaves. If so will you write by him. You think there is any chance of your being here in time. I did not go to church yesterday. The roads were in such a state. I envy your good weather. It is so bad here. I am now going to scold you darling. Why was your last letter so short and so cold. It was not the same affectionate kind letter I wish to get from you. Surely you do not love me less since you returned to Taranaki. As you have so few opportunities of writing you should send me longer letters. I cannot tell you how often your poor pussy has sat writing at night when she would have been much better in bed only she could not allow an opportunity to pass. I will not scold you any more, however my own darling I shall punish you when you come home. Mrs Kirton has just come up to see me so I must conclude. Papa has sent a number of letters by the mail and he will write next week and

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English (MD)

enclose the letter to Major Durie in case you might be there on your way in by the time the mail of tomorrow week arrives there. Jessie desires me to tell you that she is so angry with you for being away so long that she is determined to leave when you return as she cannot take the responsibility of taking drenches [?] of me any longer. She says it takes away her night's rest the thoughts of it. Good bye my own darling old plague of a husband. Ellen Paul sends her kind regards. Believe me ever my own dearest Donald to be your ever affectionate


Susan D McLean

Mrs Kirton sends her kind regards but she is very angry at you for being away so long however she says you may stay as long as you like that she can do without you.

English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
Monday August 5th [1852]


My own dearest Donald

I received your letter on Saturday by the overland mail quite unexpectedly as I did not look forward to the pleasure of hearing from my old plague till the arrival of some vessel. I was dreadfully disappointed to hear by your letter to Papa that you could not leave Taranaki for some weeks. How I hate the name of that horrid place. I am sure it has caused me more vexation and annoyance than I can tell. Nothing in the world ever persuade me to go there. It is really dreadful to think that you are to be away so long. I have now given up all hopes of seeing you before my troubles begin. What to do I know not. I dread to think of it. The idea of it made me quite ill on Saturday. To make things worse Mrs Kirton's servant is going to leave and she cannot hear of another. I know that she will do all she can for me but it is quite impossible if she has no servant that she can be with me much. Mrs McKenzie is gone to the Hutt and the doctor thinks that I should have some one nearer but I do not like the idea of having a stranger. If you were here darling it would be some comfort as you could keep poor Papa from making himself miserable which I am sure he will be. Do darling try and be in by the end of this month or the first week in September although I am not afraid still no woman can feel certain of recovery and if anything were to happen while you are away how dreadfully you my darling husband would feel it. I trust my dearest that God will spare me for the sake of you and poor Papa and from him I look for strength and support when I shall require it. I shall send this letter by the vessel which is going up. It is possible it may arrive before the Hunter's native leaves. If so will you write by him. You think there is any chance of your being here in time. I did not go to church yesterday. The roads were in such a state. I envy your good weather. It is so bad here. I am now going to scold you darling. Why was your last letter so short and so cold. It was not the same affectionate kind letter I wish to get from you. Surely you do not love me less since you returned to Taranaki. As you have so few opportunities of writing you should send me longer letters. I cannot tell you how often your poor pussy has sat writing at night when she would have been much better in bed only she could not allow an opportunity to pass. I will not scold you any more, however my own darling I shall punish you when you come home. Mrs Kirton has just come up to see me so I must conclude. Papa has sent a number of letters by the mail and he will write next week and enclose the letter to Major Durie in case you might be there on your way in by the time the mail of tomorrow week arrives there. Jessie desires me to tell you that she is so angry with you for being away so long that she is determined to leave when you return as she cannot take the responsibility of taking drenches [?] of me any longer. She says it takes away her night's rest the thoughts of it. Good bye my own darling old plague of a husband. Ellen Paul sends her kind regards. Believe me ever my own dearest Donald to be your ever affectionate


Susan D McLean

Mrs Kirton sends her kind regards but she is very angry at you for being away so long however she says you may stay as long as you like that she can do without you.

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0828 (82 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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