Object #1005846 from MS-Papers-0032-0312

4 pages written 9 Mar 1851 by Henry Halse in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0312 (49 digitised items). 43 letters written from New Plymouth and Huatoki. Includes copies of letters from Wiremu Kingi, Witi, and Aperahama, Te Kani, 1851

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

PRIVATE. New Plymouth

9th. March 1851.



Dear Sir,

By Captain King's order, William Stewart will leave to-morrow for Whanganui with despatches for the Governor-in-Chief; and I therefore send you a few lines by him.

The Whanganui natives came up from Wairau in the canoes (six), on the 1st. inst. passed the Town, and visited Waimakaiho, where they remained two days. On the 3rd. they went to Pukatapu; on the 4th. to Waitara; and on the 5th. they left for Onairo. Their next stage was to be Pukearuhe, then Mokau, and finally inland. So ordrely were they throughout, that had I not seen them, I could scarcely have believed in their presence. As it was, many of the settlers were unacquainted with their progress.


Canoes

Ko Makoriki

Ko Akarana

Paki te Umaumau

Ohinemanuhiri.

Tioriori.

Mangatenia.

Te Mawai

Aperaniko

Paora

Te Ore

Raniera

Te Mamaku.

Chiefs.

of Putiki.

of Hikurangi.

of Pukeika.

brother of Mamaku

of Tmauhaere

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English (ATL)


Your presence is much needed to settle the "Wairaka Question", the "Right of Road" to Wiremu Erangi's Reserve at Waimakaiho, and to "Purchase Land" The 1st. and 2nd. in the hands of Richard Brown, bid fair to lay the foundation for future trouble. whereas in proper hands, viz:- yours, a small matter would settle the one; and management, the other. Everyone is aware of R.B's violent ungovernable temper, - a temper that would lead him to ride over and flog the whole settlement; and if equally practicable, the world at large. Consequently he should not be trusted with business in which natives are concerned. But if he will take upon himself the management of such matters, and put his hand in the lion's mouth, he ought to take the consequences.

With regard to the 1st., R.B. has complained to Captain King about Pita and others clearing more land, the property of Major Lloyd, Captain King, I believe, has promised to bring the case under the Governor's notice, and recommended Brown to let the question rest until your return.

E Waka, and several of his people, is absent at the North. Whether he is at the bottom of this fresh encroachment, I am unable to say. No doubt. The Business altogether, is very annoying; but when I hear a man talk rashly, my sympathy

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English (ATL)

wing, and is replaced by a desire to see that man punished for his folly.

The 2nd. you are acquainted with, which is this:- Wiremu Erangi now refuses to part with his Reserve, and applies to Captain King for a right of road to it. Captain King wrote to Mr. Richardson on the subject. Mr. Brown, who appears to act for Mr. Richardson, told me that if the natives wanted to get to his Reserve he must wade through the river! What will our natives say, if told such absurd nonsense as this! "There is your Reserve; but you shall not go to it, unless you wade up the river." "Why not?" "Because there is no right of road to it!" Such reasoning might do very well in an English Court of Law in England; but I question whether it would be regarded correct by New Zealanders, particularly by those in this district, who, by a continued system of forbearance, an undecisive demeanour on our oart, regard us in no other light than their inferiors.

The 3rd. Land is greatly needed, and unless a Purchase can be shortly effected, I fear this settlement will rapidly decline. Many valuable settlers have been recently lost to us, and more will follow, from the

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English (ATL)

same cause. That there is not an inch of available land to stand upon, is becoming quite a common remark in Auckland. On this subject I have nothing to say. Indeed my confidence has been violated; which causes me to receive any information about the sale of land with great caution.

Stewart wishes me to say that your mare was inland of Rangitikei when he passed; and that he ascertained through Mr. McDonald's foreman, that the mare was frequently used by the mail carriers, and still suffering from the same lameness. He did not see your cow, in consequence of coming by the inland road. Your land at Whanganui has been abandoned by the natives, and applications made by several settlers, either to purchase it rent it, as you think fit.

I am glad to say that many of our vagabonds have left this settlement for Wellington and the Canterbury settlement, where I hope they will be picked up and taken out of the country altogether.

Hoping you are well, and that I shall soon hear from you,

I remain
Yours very faithfully (Signed)
H. Halse
To:- Donald McLean Esq.

English (ATL)

PRIVATE. New Plymouth

9th. March 1851.



Dear Sir,

By Captain King's order, William Stewart will leave to-morrow for Whanganui with despatches for the Governor-in-Chief; and I therefore send you a few lines by him.

The Whanganui natives came up from Wairau in the canoes (six), on the 1st. inst. passed the Town, and visited Waimakaiho, where they remained two days. On the 3rd. they went to Pukatapu; on the 4th. to Waitara; and on the 5th. they left for Onairo. Their next stage was to be Pukearuhe, then Mokau, and finally inland. So ordrely were they throughout, that had I not seen them, I could scarcely have believed in their presence. As it was, many of the settlers were unacquainted with their progress.


Canoes

Ko Makoriki

Ko Akarana

Paki te Umaumau

Ohinemanuhiri.

Tioriori.

Mangatenia.

Te Mawai

Aperaniko

Paora

Te Ore

Raniera

Te Mamaku.

Chiefs.

of Putiki.

of Hikurangi.

of Pukeika.

brother of Mamaku

of Tmauhaere


Your presence is much needed to settle the "Wairaka Question", the "Right of Road" to Wiremu Erangi's Reserve at Waimakaiho, and to "Purchase Land" The 1st. and 2nd. in the hands of Richard Brown, bid fair to lay the foundation for future trouble. whereas in proper hands, viz:- yours, a small matter would settle the one; and management, the other. Everyone is aware of R.B's violent ungovernable temper, - a temper that would lead him to ride over and flog the whole settlement; and if equally practicable, the world at large. Consequently he should not be trusted with business in which natives are concerned. But if he will take upon himself the management of such matters, and put his hand in the lion's mouth, he ought to take the consequences.

With regard to the 1st., R.B. has complained to Captain King about Pita and others clearing more land, the property of Major Lloyd, Captain King, I believe, has promised to bring the case under the Governor's notice, and recommended Brown to let the question rest until your return.

E Waka, and several of his people, is absent at the North. Whether he is at the bottom of this fresh encroachment, I am unable to say. No doubt. The Business altogether, is very annoying; but when I hear a man talk rashly, my sympathy wing, and is replaced by a desire to see that man punished for his folly.

The 2nd. you are acquainted with, which is this:- Wiremu Erangi now refuses to part with his Reserve, and applies to Captain King for a right of road to it. Captain King wrote to Mr. Richardson on the subject. Mr. Brown, who appears to act for Mr. Richardson, told me that if the natives wanted to get to his Reserve he must wade through the river! What will our natives say, if told such absurd nonsense as this! "There is your Reserve; but you shall not go to it, unless you wade up the river." "Why not?" "Because there is no right of road to it!" Such reasoning might do very well in an English Court of Law in England; but I question whether it would be regarded correct by New Zealanders, particularly by those in this district, who, by a continued system of forbearance, an undecisive demeanour on our oart, regard us in no other light than their inferiors.

The 3rd. Land is greatly needed, and unless a Purchase can be shortly effected, I fear this settlement will rapidly decline. Many valuable settlers have been recently lost to us, and more will follow, from the same cause. That there is not an inch of available land to stand upon, is becoming quite a common remark in Auckland. On this subject I have nothing to say. Indeed my confidence has been violated; which causes me to receive any information about the sale of land with great caution.

Stewart wishes me to say that your mare was inland of Rangitikei when he passed; and that he ascertained through Mr. McDonald's foreman, that the mare was frequently used by the mail carriers, and still suffering from the same lameness. He did not see your cow, in consequence of coming by the inland road. Your land at Whanganui has been abandoned by the natives, and applications made by several settlers, either to purchase it rent it, as you think fit.

I am glad to say that many of our vagabonds have left this settlement for Wellington and the Canterbury settlement, where I hope they will be picked up and taken out of the country altogether.

Hoping you are well, and that I shall soon hear from you,

I remain
Yours very faithfully (Signed)
H. Halse
To:- Donald McLean Esq.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0312 (49 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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