Object #1005748 from MS-Papers-0032-0041

5 pages

From: Native Minister - Memos from Governor relating to native affairs, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0041 (16 digitised items). No Item Description

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Translation. (referred to in previous letter.) Chaeawai.

May 18th. 1874.



This is a welcome from us, to you, the Governor, from the tribes of the Ngapuhi, dwelling under the protection of our most gracious Queen.

Welcome amongst this people!

It is right that you should visit the various Districts of the Colony placed by the Queen under your protection; that you should exercise her authority over the same. It is her desire that the tribes of New Zealand should live in peace; and we, also, are anxious that such arrangements should be made as shall advance the prosperity of this Island. This also, we are certain, is your own desire, that peace and good will should reign over the Island. This was the desire of the Governors who

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English (ATL)

have preceeded you.

To William Hobson, the first Governor, the Chiefs of Ngapuhi, surrendered to the Queen, the sovereignty of the Island; which was called the Treaty of Waitangi; and by the Queen's gracious command, that Treaty has been protected, that its provisions should not be ignored.

Although many troubles have arisen in the Island, the Queen's authority has not been lost, neither has her regard for the Native race diminished. We are, even now, mutually engaged in maintaining her authority and her laws.

Welcome, then, in peace, and in the joy of our hearts, that you should have paid this visit to Ngapuhi.

In the days of ignorance, this was the Pa from whence our fathers fought the soldiers of the Queen. At the present time, there stands upon that

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English (ATL)

Pa, a building erected for the worship of God. The remains, also, of the soldiers who fell at this place have been removed, and placed beside it.

Friend! Old thoughts have been buried. The burial place is "maike", (the flag staff); which has been replaced in its former position. The emblem of truth is now flying at this place, - "The peace and goodwill of Queen Victoria."

One word more we would address to you. You being the first Governor who has held a Meeting at this place, we ask you to think of a head-stone to mark the spot where our dead soldiers are lying, seeing they are now placed in ground which has been consecrated for the burial of the dead.

(Signed)
Heta te Hara
, and others.

English (ATL)

Translation. (referred to in previous letter.) Chaeawai.

May 18th. 1874.



This is a welcome from us, to you, the Governor, from the tribes of the Ngapuhi, dwelling under the protection of our most gracious Queen.

Welcome amongst this people!

It is right that you should visit the various Districts of the Colony placed by the Queen under your protection; that you should exercise her authority over the same. It is her desire that the tribes of New Zealand should live in peace; and we, also, are anxious that such arrangements should be made as shall advance the prosperity of this Island. This also, we are certain, is your own desire, that peace and good will should reign over the Island. This was the desire of the Governors who have preceeded you.

To William Hobson, the first Governor, the Chiefs of Ngapuhi, surrendered to the Queen, the sovereignty of the Island; which was called the Treaty of Waitangi; and by the Queen's gracious command, that Treaty has been protected, that its provisions should not be ignored.

Although many troubles have arisen in the Island, the Queen's authority has not been lost, neither has her regard for the Native race diminished. We are, even now, mutually engaged in maintaining her authority and her laws.

Welcome, then, in peace, and in the joy of our hearts, that you should have paid this visit to Ngapuhi.

In the days of ignorance, this was the Pa from whence our fathers fought the soldiers of the Queen. At the present time, there stands upon that Pa, a building erected for the worship of God. The remains, also, of the soldiers who fell at this place have been removed, and placed beside it.

Friend! Old thoughts have been buried. The burial place is "maike", (the flag staff); which has been replaced in its former position. The emblem of truth is now flying at this place, - "The peace and goodwill of Queen Victoria."

One word more we would address to you. You being the first Governor who has held a Meeting at this place, we ask you to think of a head-stone to mark the spot where our dead soldiers are lying, seeing they are now placed in ground which has been consecrated for the burial of the dead.

(Signed)
Heta te Hara
, and others.

Part of:
Native Minister - Memos from Governor relating to native affairs, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0041 (16 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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