Object #1005562 from MS-Papers-0032-0319

9 pages written 20 Jan 1855 by William Halse in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - William Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0319 (28 digitised items). 28 letters addressed from New Plymouth & Taranaki

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

COPY New Plymouth
20th. January 1855.


My dear McLean,

Rogan returned from the Coast last Saturday night, having done his work at Mokau as far as can be at present. About 40,000 acres have been added to the original Block. A further purchase of say, 10,000 acres can be made without opposition. For this, Rogan will apply for your authority. It appears that the natives are not agreed to sell any more

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English (ATL)

land for the present; but I think if the Mokau question is not allowed to drop, that you may go on buying until the place is fit for settlement. It would be a great boon to place all this land in the New Plymouth Province. The Aucklandites, through the Southern Cross, are disposed to be liberal towards us by carrying our boundary to Kawhia. This is as it should be; for what matters it whether the land be colonised from Auckland or New Plymouth, so long as the work is done.

The land sale, owing to the nature of the country, will make no show in the Revenue Account in our time, which would prevent the only objection our Province would be likely to raise against another receiving more land than an imaginary boundary gives it. Rogan, to whom I had written by a previous mail, received Major Nugent at Mokau, and saw him off by the beach. From the conversation that ensued between them, Rogan received an impression that the Major did not consider troops necessary here.

Our natives are still busy with their pas. One

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English (ATL)

of W. Tuke's natives came in the other day, but I do not learn that he imparted anything to them. The natives seem to be very uneasy. Their labour is almost withdrawn from us. To meet the effect of this on the Surveys, I have proposed to Head Quarters, to be allowed to have them done by Tender; which would release the Office from the details of surveys, such as running after the natives, haggling for wages, squabbling about time, and so on; and at the same time, enable Mr. Carrington to work at the Grant plans; not one of which is yet

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English (ATL)

issued, owing to the miserable system that prevails here. By arrangement with the Superintendent, who has again come forward with a guarantee, Kelly was at his work, whilst my letter was on its way; and has completed the Henui river, and is now surveying the Mangorei; these fixed boundaries being much wanted. Afterwards he will probably go into the Waiwakaiho work. The Superintendent furnishes the funds in the mean time. W. Law's

Page 5 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

charge is 1/6 and 2/- a chain, for fern and forest.

The Superintendent gave a sort of wedding evening party the other night, to Mr. and Mrs. Atkinson, (late Miss Richmond); which I attended with some 38 others, and the night before last I went to the Tradesmen's Ball at the Freemason's Hall. There were about 70; and we kept up dancing till a quarter to six, and passed an exceedingly pleasant night.

We have no news. Hetley has purchased Weston's propert at Omata; reported purchase £1500. The family intend dividing off in the place. John Weston is engaged to Molly Pearce, having fallen in love with her whilst playing in the Gentleman in Straps at Richard Brown's Ball. Hawrich Weston is a clerk at R. Brown's. Imlay is driving a herd of cattle to Wanganui, for which place Mr. and Mrs. W. King and Mrs. Richardson started overland the other day on a visit. Humphries will go to Wellington by the return steamer,

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English (ATL)

(she left for Auckland on the 18th. and return overland. I am under some promise to meet him on the road, about Ngatiruanui; which I shall probably visit with the Superintendent, who wishes to see the natives there. We were in some apprehension the other day, from the arrival of 200 natives, chiefly from Upper Taranaki, at Poutoho. They were armed, and had a War dance, and exchanged a few blows with T. Williams' people. Their ostensible, and perhaps real

Page 7 of 9. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

object, was to get for the Ngatiruanuis, some iron work for a Mill; and it shewed to us clearly which side they would take in a row. My friend, Waka, ever prominent, wanted or not, rode up to them, and tried persuasive means against their coming into town; and he enjoys the idea that he was the cause of their staying at Poutoko. The iron work was carted out to them, and they have it returned to their homes. I hear that the Governor has struck Ihaia from the list of Native

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English (ATL)

Assessors. He has been formerly reinstated at Moenaku by his allies, who will defend him, if necessary, against attack. The wounded at the Hospital are progressing. I cannot learn anything of Nopera, your particular friend. A letter from you would be welcome to the old fool.


sincerely yours (Signed)
W. Halse.
To:- Donald McLean Esq.

English (ATL)

COPY New Plymouth
20th. January 1855.


My dear McLean,

Rogan returned from the Coast last Saturday night, having done his work at Mokau as far as can be at present. About 40,000 acres have been added to the original Block. A further purchase of say, 10,000 acres can be made without opposition. For this, Rogan will apply for your authority. It appears that the natives are not agreed to sell any more land for the present; but I think if the Mokau question is not allowed to drop, that you may go on buying until the place is fit for settlement. It would be a great boon to place all this land in the New Plymouth Province. The Aucklandites, through the Southern Cross, are disposed to be liberal towards us by carrying our boundary to Kawhia. This is as it should be; for what matters it whether the land be colonised from Auckland or New Plymouth, so long as the work is done.

The land sale, owing to the nature of the country, will make no show in the Revenue Account in our time, which would prevent the only objection our Province would be likely to raise against another receiving more land than an imaginary boundary gives it. Rogan, to whom I had written by a previous mail, received Major Nugent at Mokau, and saw him off by the beach. From the conversation that ensued between them, Rogan received an impression that the Major did not consider troops necessary here.

Our natives are still busy with their pas. One of W. Tuke's natives came in the other day, but I do not learn that he imparted anything to them. The natives seem to be very uneasy. Their labour is almost withdrawn from us. To meet the effect of this on the Surveys, I have proposed to Head Quarters, to be allowed to have them done by Tender; which would release the Office from the details of surveys, such as running after the natives, haggling for wages, squabbling about time, and so on; and at the same time, enable Mr. Carrington to work at the Grant plans; not one of which is yet issued, owing to the miserable system that prevails here. By arrangement with the Superintendent, who has again come forward with a guarantee, Kelly was at his work, whilst my letter was on its way; and has completed the Henui river, and is now surveying the Mangorei; these fixed boundaries being much wanted. Afterwards he will probably go into the Waiwakaiho work. The Superintendent furnishes the funds in the mean time. W. Law's charge is 1/6 and 2/- a chain, for fern and forest.

The Superintendent gave a sort of wedding evening party the other night, to Mr. and Mrs. Atkinson, (late Miss Richmond); which I attended with some 38 others, and the night before last I went to the Tradesmen's Ball at the Freemason's Hall. There were about 70; and we kept up dancing till a quarter to six, and passed an exceedingly pleasant night.

We have no news. Hetley has purchased Weston's propert at Omata; reported purchase £1500. The family intend dividing off in the place. John Weston is engaged to Molly Pearce, having fallen in love with her whilst playing in the Gentleman in Straps at Richard Brown's Ball. Hawrich Weston is a clerk at R. Brown's. Imlay is driving a herd of cattle to Wanganui, for which place Mr. and Mrs. W. King and Mrs. Richardson started overland the other day on a visit. Humphries will go to Wellington by the return steamer, (she left for Auckland on the 18th. and return overland. I am under some promise to meet him on the road, about Ngatiruanui; which I shall probably visit with the Superintendent, who wishes to see the natives there. We were in some apprehension the other day, from the arrival of 200 natives, chiefly from Upper Taranaki, at Poutoho. They were armed, and had a War dance, and exchanged a few blows with T. Williams' people. Their ostensible, and perhaps real object, was to get for the Ngatiruanuis, some iron work for a Mill; and it shewed to us clearly which side they would take in a row. My friend, Waka, ever prominent, wanted or not, rode up to them, and tried persuasive means against their coming into town; and he enjoys the idea that he was the cause of their staying at Poutoko. The iron work was carted out to them, and they have it returned to their homes. I hear that the Governor has struck Ihaia from the list of Native Assessors. He has been formerly reinstated at Moenaku by his allies, who will defend him, if necessary, against attack. The wounded at the Hospital are progressing. I cannot learn anything of Nopera, your particular friend. A letter from you would be welcome to the old fool.


sincerely yours (Signed)
W. Halse.
To:- Donald McLean Esq.

Part of:
Inward letters - William Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0319 (28 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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