Object #1005548 from MS-Papers-0032-0041

8 pages

From: Native Minister - Memos from Governor relating to native affairs, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0041 (16 digitised items). No Item Description

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

CONFIDENTIAL.

The Governor informs the Honourable, the Native Minister that he landed at Russell on the 16th. Inst., and found a few Natives assembled with the European inhabitants to meet him. He visited the widow of Tamati Waka Neue, understanding that it would be gratifying to her, and the Ngapuhi tribe.

Mr. Kemp had come up a few days previously to make arrangements. Accompanied by him, Mr. Williams, R.M., Captain Simpson R.N. (Senior Officer), and some of the officers of H.M.S. "Blanche", Archdeacon Clark, Mr. Wi Katene, his Aide de Camp, and some some visitors, - he met the Natives at Oheawai on the 17th.

Upon the Governor taking his seat, he desired Mr. Katene to take one beside him; when he was informed that the Natives, headed by Hetta, would not present the address, (of which he had already received a translation),

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English (ATL)

while Mr. Wi Katene sat there, as he had rendered himself very obnoxious by a criminal connection with one or more women of that place. The Governor told Mr. Williams and Mr. Kemp that he ought to have been previously informed of the existence of such a feeling; but that Mr. Katene being there, he could not be asked to withdraw. On the natives persisting, the Governor threatened at once to ride forward. However, the gentlemen above named, in a few minutes persuaded them to proceed with their address, the translation of which is enclosed.

The Governor hopes that the request made in the last paragraph - that a monument may be erected over the remains of the British soldiers, who fell in the attack upon the Pah at this place in 1845, may be complied with.

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At this meeting, frequent reference was made to the recent murder of a native of this tribe, by another at Whangaroa, entirely in the sense of indignat on at the act, and a desire for its punishment; several proposing if justice cannot be otherwise done, to effect the capture of the murderer by force.

The Governor made some appropriate remarks upon the duty of submission of such questions to the ordinary operation of the law.

Proceeding on the morning of the 18th., he was met at Taheke, by Mr. Van Sturner, R.M., Mr. Webster of Hokianga, and other Europeans; also by the Chief, Moses Tawhai, and a number of the natives.

After a Iuncheon provided by the widows of the Chiefs Adam Clarke and Heke, the party embarked in boats, and in a large canoe, and proceeded to Hurst Point, where the Governor was very heartily received.

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English (ATL)


On the following morning he was accompanied on a visit to Mr. Webster's business residence by three large canoes; the Natives performing a dance at Mr. Webster's, and afterwards at Hurst Point.

At about 2 p.m., a large Meeting was held; and again much reference was made to the Whangaroa murder; but on this occasion, rather (at least by some speakers) in the sense of debate, whether or not the murderer should be surrendered; and of demand that the question should be considered by the tribe. Whereupon the Governor interposed, and strongly commented upon the inconsistency of professions of loyalty, and submission to the law, with any hesitation to submit such matters to its sole judgement. The old Chief, Moses, followed, and severely reproved some who had claimed the right of the Chiefs to be consulted in the matter.

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English (ATL)


Before his departure, the Governor was assured by Moses that both the offenders in this case, and Te Waki, the escaped convict, would be surrendered.

He had been informed that the latter man was actually taking a leading part in the demonstrations in one of the canoes; and he requested Mr. Van Sturner to see that he did not appear further. On the previous evening Moses had also told him that the Chiefs of his section were anxious to bring him up, and ask for his pardon; but the Governor requested Moses to prevent this, pointing out that no pardon could be granted to a prisoner illegally at large, and that submission must precede its being entertained.

The Governor only alluded to these cases in general terms, in his speech.

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English (ATL)


The other matters referred to by the Natives in their speeches, were the dissatisfaction felt with the New Land Act; the desire for a European settlement among them; for a gaol; for a medical man; and by one man, for the reconsideration of the rights of certain individuals, which had been overlooked in some of the early land purchases; also for roads, and a steamer. But both at this, and the Meeting at Cheawai, there was an earnest and general desire expressed for more schools. The Governor would earnestly commend this request, as also for that of a medical man, to the favourable consideration of Ministers.

The sentiments of loyalty expressed were general; and the manner in which the exhortation of the Governor, to

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English (ATL)

act in accordance with such professions, were received, was encouraging. The Governor pointed out, moreover, that the tribe had in their own hands the means of obtaining the advantages of European settlement, by selling sufficient land to induce it; but if they would not do so, they could not receive the contingent advantages.

The old Chief, Moses, took several opportunities of conversing with the Governor; and expressed his desire for a good school in the Waima valley, where there are nearly 100 children; secondly, that Adam Clark, the younger, may be appointed Assessor; who would, he hoped, succeed him in his position in the tribe; and thirdly, that the road from Hurst Point to Taheke, may be made, so as to facilitate European intercourse. With regard to this last, he asks that he may be entrusted with the expenditure of the funds, without their passing through the hands of the Native Member for the District. He thinks that for this purpose £2000 from the general fund would suffice.

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English (ATL)


At Hurst Point, also, an objection was expressed, to Mr. Katene's appearance along with the Governor; on account of his sale of some gum land belonging to the tribe, without the approval of Moses. This again, the Governor was under the necessity of withstanding; and the good feeling of the natives led to its being waived; but the Governor must express his surprise that the Native Department should not have been aware of, and have given him notice of the likelihood of such a contretemps.


He proceeds to Mongonui tomorrow. Bay of Islands. 20th. May 1874.

English (ATL)

CONFIDENTIAL.

The Governor informs the Honourable, the Native Minister that he landed at Russell on the 16th. Inst., and found a few Natives assembled with the European inhabitants to meet him. He visited the widow of Tamati Waka Neue, understanding that it would be gratifying to her, and the Ngapuhi tribe.

Mr. Kemp had come up a few days previously to make arrangements. Accompanied by him, Mr. Williams, R.M., Captain Simpson R.N. (Senior Officer), and some of the officers of H.M.S. "Blanche", Archdeacon Clark, Mr. Wi Katene, his Aide de Camp, and some some visitors, - he met the Natives at Oheawai on the 17th.

Upon the Governor taking his seat, he desired Mr. Katene to take one beside him; when he was informed that the Natives, headed by Hetta, would not present the address, (of which he had already received a translation), while Mr. Wi Katene sat there, as he had rendered himself very obnoxious by a criminal connection with one or more women of that place. The Governor told Mr. Williams and Mr. Kemp that he ought to have been previously informed of the existence of such a feeling; but that Mr. Katene being there, he could not be asked to withdraw. On the natives persisting, the Governor threatened at once to ride forward. However, the gentlemen above named, in a few minutes persuaded them to proceed with their address, the translation of which is enclosed.

The Governor hopes that the request made in the last paragraph - that a monument may be erected over the remains of the British soldiers, who fell in the attack upon the Pah at this place in 1845, may be complied with.

At this meeting, frequent reference was made to the recent murder of a native of this tribe, by another at Whangaroa, entirely in the sense of indignat on at the act, and a desire for its punishment; several proposing if justice cannot be otherwise done, to effect the capture of the murderer by force.

The Governor made some appropriate remarks upon the duty of submission of such questions to the ordinary operation of the law.

Proceeding on the morning of the 18th., he was met at Taheke, by Mr. Van Sturner, R.M., Mr. Webster of Hokianga, and other Europeans; also by the Chief, Moses Tawhai, and a number of the natives.

After a Iuncheon provided by the widows of the Chiefs Adam Clarke and Heke, the party embarked in boats, and in a large canoe, and proceeded to Hurst Point, where the Governor was very heartily received.

On the following morning he was accompanied on a visit to Mr. Webster's business residence by three large canoes; the Natives performing a dance at Mr. Webster's, and afterwards at Hurst Point.

At about 2 p.m., a large Meeting was held; and again much reference was made to the Whangaroa murder; but on this occasion, rather (at least by some speakers) in the sense of debate, whether or not the murderer should be surrendered; and of demand that the question should be considered by the tribe. Whereupon the Governor interposed, and strongly commented upon the inconsistency of professions of loyalty, and submission to the law, with any hesitation to submit such matters to its sole judgement. The old Chief, Moses, followed, and severely reproved some who had claimed the right of the Chiefs to be consulted in the matter.

Before his departure, the Governor was assured by Moses that both the offenders in this case, and Te Waki, the escaped convict, would be surrendered.

He had been informed that the latter man was actually taking a leading part in the demonstrations in one of the canoes; and he requested Mr. Van Sturner to see that he did not appear further. On the previous evening Moses had also told him that the Chiefs of his section were anxious to bring him up, and ask for his pardon; but the Governor requested Moses to prevent this, pointing out that no pardon could be granted to a prisoner illegally at large, and that submission must precede its being entertained.

The Governor only alluded to these cases in general terms, in his speech.

The other matters referred to by the Natives in their speeches, were the dissatisfaction felt with the New Land Act; the desire for a European settlement among them; for a gaol; for a medical man; and by one man, for the reconsideration of the rights of certain individuals, which had been overlooked in some of the early land purchases; also for roads, and a steamer. But both at this, and the Meeting at Cheawai, there was an earnest and general desire expressed for more schools. The Governor would earnestly commend this request, as also for that of a medical man, to the favourable consideration of Ministers.

The sentiments of loyalty expressed were general; and the manner in which the exhortation of the Governor, to act in accordance with such professions, were received, was encouraging. The Governor pointed out, moreover, that the tribe had in their own hands the means of obtaining the advantages of European settlement, by selling sufficient land to induce it; but if they would not do so, they could not receive the contingent advantages.

The old Chief, Moses, took several opportunities of conversing with the Governor; and expressed his desire for a good school in the Waima valley, where there are nearly 100 children; secondly, that Adam Clark, the younger, may be appointed Assessor; who would, he hoped, succeed him in his position in the tribe; and thirdly, that the road from Hurst Point to Taheke, may be made, so as to facilitate European intercourse. With regard to this last, he asks that he may be entrusted with the expenditure of the funds, without their passing through the hands of the Native Member for the District. He thinks that for this purpose £2000 from the general fund would suffice.

At Hurst Point, also, an objection was expressed, to Mr. Katene's appearance along with the Governor; on account of his sale of some gum land belonging to the tribe, without the approval of Moses. This again, the Governor was under the necessity of withstanding; and the good feeling of the natives led to its being waived; but the Governor must express his surprise that the Native Department should not have been aware of, and have given him notice of the likelihood of such a contretemps.


He proceeds to Mongonui tomorrow. Bay of Islands. 20th. May 1874.

Part of:
Native Minister - Memos from Governor relating to native affairs, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0041 (16 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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