Object #1005311 from MS-Papers-0032-0016

6 pages written 21 Sep 1849 by Edward John Eyre to Alfred Domett

From: Miscellaneous native affairs, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0016 (29 digitised items). Includes a letter in Maori regarding the sale of land in the Manawatu

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Memo. to Mr. Domett, from G. Eyre, dated 21st. September 1849. COPY.
Mr. Domett,

Reply to Mr. Fox's letter of the 18th. September, and state that having laid before the Executive Council that communication, and the previous correspondence to which it relates, - the Council have advised me in the terms of the resolution, of which a Copy is herewith enclosed.

From this resolution, Mr. Fox will observe that in the opinion of the Executive Council of the Province, the measures which they consider best to be adopted, are first, - to renew the negotiations at once for the acquisition of the Wairarapa District; and secondly, to authorise the Commissioner who may be appointed to undertake this duty, to proceed under the Native Lands Purchase Ordinance, against any parties he may consider, from their arrangements with the natives, to stand in the way

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English (ATL)

of the adjustment of the question.

I shall, if the Company's Agent approves of the recommendations, be prepared to pursue the course advised by the Executive Council, - subject of course, to any directions which may be received from the Governor-in-Chief.

The Council has advised that Mr. McLean should be employed, if possible, in preference to any other Commissioner; and that they consider as the Manawatu question may probably occupy some time, and it would not be necessary for Mr. McLean to be always on the spot, that that Officer may undertake the two negotiations contemporaneously, by passing from one district to another, as occasion may render advisable; through the Rangitikei

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English (ATL)

pass, said to be a short and easy route into the valley of the Wairarapa.

Should the Company's Agent coincide in the views expressed by the Council, on this point, I will at once give Mr. McLean the necessary instructions; or I shall be glad to receive from Mr. Fox, any other suggestions which he may consider more desirable.

I cannot close this communication without bringing under Mr. Fox's notice, that in your letter of the 13th. current, no statement was made as might be inferred from Mr. Fox's reply, that the Governor-in-Chief had refused to put the Native Land Purchase Ordinance in force; but simply a statement to the effect that I had received from him no specific instructions on the subject; and that in certain instances in the Manawatu neighbourhood, His

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English (ATL)

Excellency had, last year, caused proceedings to be stayed, which were being taken under the Ordinance in question.

In another part of the Principal Agent's letter, occurs the following passage:- "'Though I have no other course except to bow to His Excellency's decision, yet I feel bound respectfully to protest against the suspension of the law on a case so seriously affecting the interests of the New Zealand Company; which, under existing arrangements with the Home Government, has been led to expecting assistance towards the acquisition of the waste lands, and particularly of the Wairarapa district."

As the above passage appears to imply that the local Government have not afforded every assistance in their power, towards the acquisition of the waste lands, on the part of the New Zealand Company, I beg most explicitly and distinctly to state that since my arrival in the Province, every exertion

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English (ATL)

has been made by the Government, in a spirit of the most cordial co-operation to meet the wishes and views of the New Zealand Company; which could be properly made with a due regard to the rights of the Colonists and Squatters, and to the general welfare of the community at large. But the Government cannot be expected to take any measures for this purpose, which may interfere with their general policy, - may be likely to bring about a collision between the two races, or may inflict upon a large and important section of the community, serious injury or hardship. With reference more particularly to the Wairarapa question, I need hardly recall to Mr. Fox's recollection, that both the New Zealand Company and the Secretary of State, in England, are well aware that serious difficulties and impediments

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English (ATL)

existed in the way of acquiring the immediate cession of that district from the natives, - not the least of which was. that in the event of steps being taken with regard to any of the Squatters located there, with sheep or cattle, no place has been acquired, to which such parties could remove, as it is only recently (comparatively speaking), that the Whanganui and Rangitikei districts have been obtained; nor yet have the New Zealand Company sufficiently completed their arrangements with regard to their original purchasers, who may have land to select in those districts, to admit of their letting out the residue to Squatters, who might be disposed to remove thither.

(Signed)
G. Eyre.
21st. September 1849.

P.S.
This letter and the accompanying documents should be got ready as soon as practicable, and be directed to Mr. McLean, care of Mr. Duncan, Manawatu; as I imagine Mr. McLean, if not already there, is on his way to that place.

When the letters are ready, they should be sent to the Sub-Inspector of Police, with a request that he will send them by the earliest opportunity by a Policeman.

(Signed) G. Eyre.

English (ATL)

Memo. to Mr. Domett, from G. Eyre, dated 21st. September 1849. COPY.
Mr. Domett,

Reply to Mr. Fox's letter of the 18th. September, and state that having laid before the Executive Council that communication, and the previous correspondence to which it relates, - the Council have advised me in the terms of the resolution, of which a Copy is herewith enclosed.

From this resolution, Mr. Fox will observe that in the opinion of the Executive Council of the Province, the measures which they consider best to be adopted, are first, - to renew the negotiations at once for the acquisition of the Wairarapa District; and secondly, to authorise the Commissioner who may be appointed to undertake this duty, to proceed under the Native Lands Purchase Ordinance, against any parties he may consider, from their arrangements with the natives, to stand in the way of the adjustment of the question.

I shall, if the Company's Agent approves of the recommendations, be prepared to pursue the course advised by the Executive Council, - subject of course, to any directions which may be received from the Governor-in-Chief.

The Council has advised that Mr. McLean should be employed, if possible, in preference to any other Commissioner; and that they consider as the Manawatu question may probably occupy some time, and it would not be necessary for Mr. McLean to be always on the spot, that that Officer may undertake the two negotiations contemporaneously, by passing from one district to another, as occasion may render advisable; through the Rangitikei pass, said to be a short and easy route into the valley of the Wairarapa.

Should the Company's Agent coincide in the views expressed by the Council, on this point, I will at once give Mr. McLean the necessary instructions; or I shall be glad to receive from Mr. Fox, any other suggestions which he may consider more desirable.

I cannot close this communication without bringing under Mr. Fox's notice, that in your letter of the 13th. current, no statement was made as might be inferred from Mr. Fox's reply, that the Governor-in-Chief had refused to put the Native Land Purchase Ordinance in force; but simply a statement to the effect that I had received from him no specific instructions on the subject; and that in certain instances in the Manawatu neighbourhood, His Excellency had, last year, caused proceedings to be stayed, which were being taken under the Ordinance in question.

In another part of the Principal Agent's letter, occurs the following passage:- "'Though I have no other course except to bow to His Excellency's decision, yet I feel bound respectfully to protest against the suspension of the law on a case so seriously affecting the interests of the New Zealand Company; which, under existing arrangements with the Home Government, has been led to expecting assistance towards the acquisition of the waste lands, and particularly of the Wairarapa district."

As the above passage appears to imply that the local Government have not afforded every assistance in their power, towards the acquisition of the waste lands, on the part of the New Zealand Company, I beg most explicitly and distinctly to state that since my arrival in the Province, every exertion has been made by the Government, in a spirit of the most cordial co-operation to meet the wishes and views of the New Zealand Company; which could be properly made with a due regard to the rights of the Colonists and Squatters, and to the general welfare of the community at large. But the Government cannot be expected to take any measures for this purpose, which may interfere with their general policy, - may be likely to bring about a collision between the two races, or may inflict upon a large and important section of the community, serious injury or hardship. With reference more particularly to the Wairarapa question, I need hardly recall to Mr. Fox's recollection, that both the New Zealand Company and the Secretary of State, in England, are well aware that serious difficulties and impediments existed in the way of acquiring the immediate cession of that district from the natives, - not the least of which was. that in the event of steps being taken with regard to any of the Squatters located there, with sheep or cattle, no place has been acquired, to which such parties could remove, as it is only recently (comparatively speaking), that the Whanganui and Rangitikei districts have been obtained; nor yet have the New Zealand Company sufficiently completed their arrangements with regard to their original purchasers, who may have land to select in those districts, to admit of their letting out the residue to Squatters, who might be disposed to remove thither.

(Signed)
G. Eyre.
21st. September 1849.

P.S.
This letter and the accompanying documents should be got ready as soon as practicable, and be directed to Mr. McLean, care of Mr. Duncan, Manawatu; as I imagine Mr. McLean, if not already there, is on his way to that place.

When the letters are ready, they should be sent to the Sub-Inspector of Police, with a request that he will send them by the earliest opportunity by a Policeman.

(Signed) G. Eyre.

Part of:
Miscellaneous native affairs, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0016 (29 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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