Object #1005204 from MS-Papers-0032-0657

2 pages written 6 Jul 1864 by George Tovey Buckland Worgan in Wairoa

From: Inward letters - G Worgan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0657 (12 digitised items). 11 letters written from Wairoa, Napier and Wellington, 1863-1876

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Te Wairoa
July 6th 1864


My dear Sir,

Irrespective of the pleasure of communicating with those whom we esteem, I have in the present instance to give you information which should have been derived through my son, but it appears the great, little Major is so jealous of your influence with the Natives, and so anxious to monopolise all the credit of preserving the peace of the province, that he has put an interdect upon George's furnishing you with any further reports of Native affairs, so long at least as he shall be in the position of a Sub in the C.C. department. The fun of it is that the R. M. is as jealous of my sons influence with the Natives as the C.C. is of yourself. All this is amusing, but unfortunately mischevous at the same time - But I suppose, must be endured for the present; in the mean time, I may say that what has been accomplished, has been effected by my sons activity and intelligence, superadded to the regard evinced towards him by all the native race in this district. Of course I am writing to you in your non official capacity, at the same time willing, that you should use, your own judgment in any use you can make of it.

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English (ATL)


My Son's words are, "I wish the Superintendent to know, that I have spared no exertion, to push forward guardedly, the interests of the government. That the movement amongst the Natives, which will in its issue more than answer the purpose proposed by 'Kopu' in a general meeting at the Wairoa, has originated with and been carried out, solely by myself, and that my present position cripples my usefulness very materially." He further says my present opinion is that the Natives hereabouts are beginning to entertain the notion, that there is more to be lost than gained by a disturbance of the peace, at the same time its utmost value will be no more than possibly to tide us over present difficulties, and gain time. However Time, and victory, are in the native question synonymous terms. The example set by Te Arawa, is of much value and the development of simalar feeling should not be checked. I think an efficient body of men could gradually be culled from amongst the friendly Natives here willing to do the Government good service. Te Waru, and his party are much discouraged, at finding the turn things have taken here himself, and some of his adherents will probably join the Uriweras. I do not think there is imminent danger to this District, at the same time it would be dangerous and injudicious to relax in precaution, and vigilance

English (ATL)

Te Wairoa
July 6th 1864


My dear Sir,

Irrespective of the pleasure of communicating with those whom we esteem, I have in the present instance to give you information which should have been derived through my son, but it appears the great, little Major is so jealous of your influence with the Natives, and so anxious to monopolise all the credit of preserving the peace of the province, that he has put an interdect upon George's furnishing you with any further reports of Native affairs, so long at least as he shall be in the position of a Sub in the C.C. department. The fun of it is that the R. M. is as jealous of my sons influence with the Natives as the C.C. is of yourself. All this is amusing, but unfortunately mischevous at the same time - But I suppose, must be endured for the present; in the mean time, I may say that what has been accomplished, has been effected by my sons activity and intelligence, superadded to the regard evinced towards him by all the native race in this district. Of course I am writing to you in your non official capacity, at the same time willing, that you should use, your own judgment in any use you can make of it.

My Son's words are, "I wish the Superintendent to know, that I have spared no exertion, to push forward guardedly, the interests of the government. That the movement amongst the Natives, which will in its issue more than answer the purpose proposed by 'Kopu' in a general meeting at the Wairoa, has originated with and been carried out, solely by myself, and that my present position cripples my usefulness very materially." He further says my present opinion is that the Natives hereabouts are beginning to entertain the notion, that there is more to be lost than gained by a disturbance of the peace, at the same time its utmost value will be no more than possibly to tide us over present difficulties, and gain time. However Time, and victory, are in the native question synonymous terms. The example set by Te Arawa, is of much value and the development of simalar feeling should not be checked. I think an efficient body of men could gradually be culled from amongst the friendly Natives here willing to do the Government good service. Te Waru, and his party are much discouraged, at finding the turn things have taken here himself, and some of his adherents will probably join the Uriweras. I do not think there is imminent danger to this District, at the same time it would be dangerous and injudicious to relax in precaution, and vigilance

Part of:
Inward letters - G Worgan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0657 (12 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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