Object #1005121 from MS-Papers-0032-0279

6 pages written 30 Dec 1871 by Sir William Fox in Westoe to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Sir William Fox, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0279 (45 digitised items). 43 letters written by Fox from Wellington, Wanganui, Auckland, Grahamstown, Rangitikei, Marton, Dunedin, 1870-1871. Includes letter from Charles J Taylor to Fox, Feb 1870; Fox to Mete Kingi, 1870; incomplete letter to Fox (written from Patea, Mar 1870); Fox to Gisborne, Apr 1870; Fox to Gisborne (copy), May 1871; J Booth to Fox, Wanganui (copy), Apr 1871; McLean to Fox, 1871; Albert J Allen [?] to Fox, Aug 1871.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Westoe, Marton,

30. 12. 71



My dear McLean,

I don't like what I hear from Patea; and should be glad to know that you will be up in that direction before long. The position of affairs as near as I can guess is this.

1. There is Noake who under the instructions he holds hitherto, does all he can to keep the Natives out of the district S. of Waingongoro, and absolutely prohibits their settling there.

2. There are a few of the settlers who would like to see some natives in the district for the benefit of trade.

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English (ATL)


3. There are the Militia who would like to see a row, in order that they might be kept on pay, and who would encourage the return of Natives in the hope that you would feel obliged to keep the Militia on pay if there was a feeling of insecurity.

4. There are the returned refugees who would not hesitate to take the law into their own hands if occasion offered in consequence of the Natives coming back without authority of government.

5. There are the Natives. I hear that many of Titikos people are settling down in the

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English (ATL)

immediate neighbourhood of Waihi (on the North side of Waingongoro) and that Titiko himself is expected back at Ngutu Te Mano on the 1st January. Further they come in defiance of Government, and with a threat that they will fight for their land if we insist on confiscation.

6. There is Titikowaru himself on whose head there is a reward of £1000 - who is as yet unpardoned by Govt. and whom any of the Refugees would probably shoot down and claim the reward if they had a favorable opportunity.

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English (ATL)


With all these conflicting elements the position is not satisfactory and I would suggest that the sooner you can get to Wanganui so as to be within reach of the frontier, the better. You will be better able then to judge for yourself and to interfere with effect if necessary; and the negociations with the Wanganui's respecting lands etc. might go on at same time. The summer is slipping over.

I hear the Kakariki natives are still bent on stopping the Railway Survey a number of them were out yesterday looking for the Surveyors, intending to

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English (ATL)

turn them off if found.

McDonald I have heard little of, except some reliable particulars of his treachery on his return from Welln. The first thing he did was to consult a lawyer how far the natives might go in the use of physical force to prevent the Execution of the Survey of the Orowa reserve. This was within a week after you had employed him, and he had promised to do all he could to assist the Surveys. The lawyer fortunately did not encourage him, which was probably the reason why he rather backed out of the

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English (ATL)

opposition, which he had commenced. He is an accomplished scoundrel.

The natives are pretty busy keeping Christmas and I have seen very few of them, but intend to go over the river next week to have a look at them.

Mrs. Fox unites in Compts. of Season to Miss McLean and yourself,


and I remain, Yours very sincerely,
Wm. Fox.

English (ATL)

Westoe, Marton,

30. 12. 71



My dear McLean,

I don't like what I hear from Patea; and should be glad to know that you will be up in that direction before long. The position of affairs as near as I can guess is this.

1. There is Noake who under the instructions he holds hitherto, does all he can to keep the Natives out of the district S. of Waingongoro, and absolutely prohibits their settling there.

2. There are a few of the settlers who would like to see some natives in the district for the benefit of trade.

3. There are the Militia who would like to see a row, in order that they might be kept on pay, and who would encourage the return of Natives in the hope that you would feel obliged to keep the Militia on pay if there was a feeling of insecurity.

4. There are the returned refugees who would not hesitate to take the law into their own hands if occasion offered in consequence of the Natives coming back without authority of government.

5. There are the Natives. I hear that many of Titikos people are settling down in the immediate neighbourhood of Waihi (on the North side of Waingongoro) and that Titiko himself is expected back at Ngutu Te Mano on the 1st January. Further they come in defiance of Government, and with a threat that they will fight for their land if we insist on confiscation.

6. There is Titikowaru himself on whose head there is a reward of £1000 - who is as yet unpardoned by Govt. and whom any of the Refugees would probably shoot down and claim the reward if they had a favorable opportunity.

With all these conflicting elements the position is not satisfactory and I would suggest that the sooner you can get to Wanganui so as to be within reach of the frontier, the better. You will be better able then to judge for yourself and to interfere with effect if necessary; and the negociations with the Wanganui's respecting lands etc. might go on at same time. The summer is slipping over.

I hear the Kakariki natives are still bent on stopping the Railway Survey a number of them were out yesterday looking for the Surveyors, intending to turn them off if found.

McDonald I have heard little of, except some reliable particulars of his treachery on his return from Welln. The first thing he did was to consult a lawyer how far the natives might go in the use of physical force to prevent the Execution of the Survey of the Orowa reserve. This was within a week after you had employed him, and he had promised to do all he could to assist the Surveys. The lawyer fortunately did not encourage him, which was probably the reason why he rather backed out of the opposition, which he had commenced. He is an accomplished scoundrel.

The natives are pretty busy keeping Christmas and I have seen very few of them, but intend to go over the river next week to have a look at them.

Mrs. Fox unites in Compts. of Season to Miss McLean and yourself,


and I remain, Yours very sincerely,
Wm. Fox.

Part of:
Inward letters - Sir William Fox, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0279 (45 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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