Object #1005064 from MS-Papers-0032-0014

4 pages written 23 May 1861 by Thomas Henry Smith and Sir Donald McLean

From: Secretary, Native Department - War in Taranaki and King Movement, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0014 (46 digitised items). Includes letters about war in Taranaki and the King movement and a letter in Maori from McLean to Wiremu Kingi offering him land

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)


In perusing before translation the proclamation which has been prepared for the Waikato Natives we find that it contains demands which we believe would at present be resisted by the great majorities of the tribes throughout New Zealand. The point to be considered is whether this is the time for so fully enunciating the views of the Government of the questions at issue with the Natives. It appears to us that while a general manifesto of the Governors views may be promulgated in the Colony carefully avoiding those which are best prepared for resistance.

3 The settlers who are

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English (ATL)

scattered over a great surface of the country may have their lives and property sacrificed before any succour can be afforded them. It does not appear that they are advised by the Govt. of the steps in contemplation the effect of which may be to lead to such a catastrophe. We submit therefore that means should be taken to warn these settlers of the danger to which they are exposed before the Govt. commits itself to a course which may imperil their lives and property.

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English (ATL)


The objectionable points in the manifesto to urge at the Ngaruawahia meeting are

1st. The claim to have roads and bridges made.

2. The reference to land remaining their own only so long as they are able to keep it. This language would be construed by the Natives as a threat emanating from the Governor.

3. The demand that the King flag should be hauled down and the Queens hoisted in its place.

4. We are also of the opinion that the manifesto unnecessarily cammits the Govt. to a recognition of the Maori King and being addressed to the meeting at Ngaruawahia will be regarded by the Natives as an admission on the part of the Govt. of the position they have assumed.

We submit the following outline which contains all that appears to us necessary as a preliminary to further negotiation and would suggest the propriety of consulting chiefs who have been taken into the counsels of the Govt. before the Governors ultimatum is sent to Waikato.

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English (ATL)


Some of the reasons for this opinion that at present suggest themselves may be briefly stated as follows:

First that the European colonists throughout New Zealand are not prepared for the possible consequences of the Natives making up their minds to refuse the terms of this proclamation, and to unite in a more determined resistance to the Govt. to prevent the suppression of the Maori King by force, an object in which there would be much more unity than was the case in reference to the Taranaki war.

2. The Natives would be likely to attack the most defenceless positions in the Colony carefully avoiding those which are prepared for resistance.

The settlers who are scattered over a great surface of country may have their lives and property sacrificed before any succour can be afforded.

(written by
Donald McLean
, copied by
Thos. H. Smith
May 23rd 1861.

)

English (ATL)


In perusing before translation the proclamation which has been prepared for the Waikato Natives we find that it contains demands which we believe would at present be resisted by the great majorities of the tribes throughout New Zealand. The point to be considered is whether this is the time for so fully enunciating the views of the Government of the questions at issue with the Natives. It appears to us that while a general manifesto of the Governors views may be promulgated in the Colony carefully avoiding those which are best prepared for resistance.

3 The settlers who are scattered over a great surface of the country may have their lives and property sacrificed before any succour can be afforded them. It does not appear that they are advised by the Govt. of the steps in contemplation the effect of which may be to lead to such a catastrophe. We submit therefore that means should be taken to warn these settlers of the danger to which they are exposed before the Govt. commits itself to a course which may imperil their lives and property.

The objectionable points in the manifesto to urge at the Ngaruawahia meeting are

1st. The claim to have roads and bridges made.

2. The reference to land remaining their own only so long as they are able to keep it. This language would be construed by the Natives as a threat emanating from the Governor.

3. The demand that the King flag should be hauled down and the Queens hoisted in its place.

4. We are also of the opinion that the manifesto unnecessarily cammits the Govt. to a recognition of the Maori King and being addressed to the meeting at Ngaruawahia will be regarded by the Natives as an admission on the part of the Govt. of the position they have assumed.

We submit the following outline which contains all that appears to us necessary as a preliminary to further negotiation and would suggest the propriety of consulting chiefs who have been taken into the counsels of the Govt. before the Governors ultimatum is sent to Waikato.

Some of the reasons for this opinion that at present suggest themselves may be briefly stated as follows:

First that the European colonists throughout New Zealand are not prepared for the possible consequences of the Natives making up their minds to refuse the terms of this proclamation, and to unite in a more determined resistance to the Govt. to prevent the suppression of the Maori King by force, an object in which there would be much more unity than was the case in reference to the Taranaki war.

2. The Natives would be likely to attack the most defenceless positions in the Colony carefully avoiding those which are prepared for resistance.

The settlers who are scattered over a great surface of country may have their lives and property sacrificed before any succour can be afforded.

(written by
Donald McLean
, copied by
Thos. H. Smith
May 23rd 1861.

)

Part of:
Secretary, Native Department - War in Taranaki and King Movement, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0014 (46 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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