Object #1004999 from MS-Papers-0032-0276

3 pages written 10 May 1858 by Josiah Flight in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean in Auckland Region

From: Inward letters - Josiah Flight, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0276 (45 digitised items). 43 letters addressed from Mangoraka, Te Ika Moana, Resident Magistrate's Office, New Plymouth, Henui, 1846-1872, and undated. Also letter from A D Flight, 6 Mar [187-], New Plymouth to Sir Donald McLean; letter from Josiah Flight to Thomas Kelly, 22 Jul 1870 re Cape Egmont Flax CompanyAlso poem addressed to `My dear Donald McLean' entitled `No Land' (on verso) written by Josiah Flight

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

New Plymouth

10th May 1858



My dear Sir,

Believing you to be now in Auckland I have now some hopes that my note may reach you. The Native confusion appears to be getting every day worse confounded; but I believe that circumstance will only facilitate any decided steps of the Government in interfering to put an end to these disputes. I believe nothing will now do but such steps as will take the matter entirely out of the hands of the natives, but at the same time I believe the Native mind is better prepared than ever to have all their disputes settled for them by the strong arm of the law and only let them once feel assured that the same arm

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English (ATL)

that in any way coerces is equally stretched out for their protection and we shall find them becoming co workers with us in carrying out just and righteous measures. I look on the Maori King movement as one that will pass away in a speedy, quiet and easy death, when the end will be found attainable in a more sure and certain way by submitting to the rule of the British Government.

The return of Karipa, Raniera and others who had in their Committees at the Waitara when the Waikato chiefs were down stated that peace should be made as sufficient payment for Katatori's death had been taken is a fresh proof that the war has been carried on by W. Kingi for other and more avaricious results. His mana I believe to be in the wane. It is now seldom used but what comments are made on his cowardice and deceit --- Be assured that he must be brought down to his proper level and not allowed by his cunning any longer to mislead the people whom he has hitherto deceived ---

The natives appear to be generally anxiously looking out with expectation that the Government is about to take some step; and I believe are wishful that it should; but they cannot yet fully rely on the intentions or the ability of the Government to protect them. I believe a declaration founded on the simple policy that no man shall forcibly interfere with another in the disposition of his land, (except so far as the necessity of alienating it to the Government when disposed to sell in order that by a Government Grant he might enjoy the full protection of the law in guarding his property) would be easily understood and fully appreciated by the great body of the Natives.

Mrs. Flight and my daughters would have desired me to

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English (ATL)

remember them kindly to you had they known of my intention to write ---

Believe me to be
Very sincerely yrs,
Josiah Flight

P. S. I look forward to the settling of the Native question here as the crowning act of your useful political career, and one which in its results will I trust enable you to look back with perfect satisfaction on the labours attending it.

D. McLean Esqr. Auckland

English (ATL)

New Plymouth

10th May 1858



My dear Sir,

Believing you to be now in Auckland I have now some hopes that my note may reach you. The Native confusion appears to be getting every day worse confounded; but I believe that circumstance will only facilitate any decided steps of the Government in interfering to put an end to these disputes. I believe nothing will now do but such steps as will take the matter entirely out of the hands of the natives, but at the same time I believe the Native mind is better prepared than ever to have all their disputes settled for them by the strong arm of the law and only let them once feel assured that the same arm that in any way coerces is equally stretched out for their protection and we shall find them becoming co workers with us in carrying out just and righteous measures. I look on the Maori King movement as one that will pass away in a speedy, quiet and easy death, when the end will be found attainable in a more sure and certain way by submitting to the rule of the British Government.

The return of Karipa, Raniera and others who had in their Committees at the Waitara when the Waikato chiefs were down stated that peace should be made as sufficient payment for Katatori's death had been taken is a fresh proof that the war has been carried on by W. Kingi for other and more avaricious results. His mana I believe to be in the wane. It is now seldom used but what comments are made on his cowardice and deceit --- Be assured that he must be brought down to his proper level and not allowed by his cunning any longer to mislead the people whom he has hitherto deceived ---

The natives appear to be generally anxiously looking out with expectation that the Government is about to take some step; and I believe are wishful that it should; but they cannot yet fully rely on the intentions or the ability of the Government to protect them. I believe a declaration founded on the simple policy that no man shall forcibly interfere with another in the disposition of his land, (except so far as the necessity of alienating it to the Government when disposed to sell in order that by a Government Grant he might enjoy the full protection of the law in guarding his property) would be easily understood and fully appreciated by the great body of the Natives.

Mrs. Flight and my daughters would have desired me to remember them kindly to you had they known of my intention to write ---

Believe me to be
Very sincerely yrs,
Josiah Flight

P. S. I look forward to the settling of the Native question here as the crowning act of your useful political career, and one which in its results will I trust enable you to look back with perfect satisfaction on the labours attending it.

D. McLean Esqr. Auckland

Part of:
Inward letters - Josiah Flight, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0276 (45 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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