Object #1004536 from MS-Papers-0032-0374

3 pages written 31 Jul 1851 by Henry King in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry King, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0374 (73 digitised items). 71 letters written from Taranaki - Police Office, Brooklands & New Plymouth

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

New Plymouth

July 31st. 1851.



Dear Maclean,

I received yours of the 14th. July, by the overland mail; and was glad to find by an Official letter I received at the same time from Cooper, a proposition from the Governor to the settlers, to reduce the town, and to introduce Pensioners. I have no doubt but all parties will readily acquiese in this arrangement, more especially if men of good character are selected. I feel satisfied myself that the arrangements will tend materially to the benefit of the place; although I fear that owing to many of the absentee proprietors not being represented here, some delay may take place

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English (ATL)

before the arrangement can be carried into effect. You are aware that I always advocated ample protection when any was afforded. This is the first step in the right path; and if two hundred Troops could be spared, in addition to the Pensioners propsed, I think the law might be enforced without risking the peace of the settlement. But the natives are so numerous in this district that I fear they will not pay much regard to Pensioners alone; and as to our Nilitia, they are numerically strong, but too inefficient to place any dependence on them. We require land more than anything I could name, and if you can succeed in obtaining the consent of the natives to the arrangement you speak of in your letter, placing them between the Mongaraka and Waiongona rivers, and securing to the Europeans the whole of the land as far as the Mongaraka, it would be a great point gained; although I am persuaded you should not let anything interfere with your purchasing the whole of the Block comprised between the North bank of the Waitara, and the South bank of the Oranui rivers. It is a level district, and a rich soil, chiefly fern, which is now so much desired. We find the small native reserves a great pest, and the source of constant disagreements. It would be very desirable, if practicable, to induce them to abandon all those included within the Town. In fact, it would be advisable to confine them to one spot as much as possible.

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English (ATL)


August 1st.



The "Lucy James" arrived from Manakau yesterday; and it is expected she will sail to-night for Wellington. If so, Rawiri and a native friend of his, will take a passage in her.

You will have received an Account before this reaches you, that William Stewart has been suspended. His former derilicitions had not been made known to me, and I supposed him to be one of the most sober and trustworthy men in the Force. With regard to Medland, I am at a loss to advise, but think he would make you a most excellent clerk, as he writes a good hand, and is remarkably quick, besides being tolerably versed in figures.

I have only to repeat that I hope you endeavoured to procure us land at New Plymouth, and that your endeavours may be crowned with success; price not to be a consideration.

All desire their kind regards.


Yours truly (Signed)
Henry King.
To:- Donald McLean Esq.

English (ATL)

New Plymouth

July 31st. 1851.



Dear Maclean,

I received yours of the 14th. July, by the overland mail; and was glad to find by an Official letter I received at the same time from Cooper, a proposition from the Governor to the settlers, to reduce the town, and to introduce Pensioners. I have no doubt but all parties will readily acquiese in this arrangement, more especially if men of good character are selected. I feel satisfied myself that the arrangements will tend materially to the benefit of the place; although I fear that owing to many of the absentee proprietors not being represented here, some delay may take place before the arrangement can be carried into effect. You are aware that I always advocated ample protection when any was afforded. This is the first step in the right path; and if two hundred Troops could be spared, in addition to the Pensioners propsed, I think the law might be enforced without risking the peace of the settlement. But the natives are so numerous in this district that I fear they will not pay much regard to Pensioners alone; and as to our Nilitia, they are numerically strong, but too inefficient to place any dependence on them. We require land more than anything I could name, and if you can succeed in obtaining the consent of the natives to the arrangement you speak of in your letter, placing them between the Mongaraka and Waiongona rivers, and securing to the Europeans the whole of the land as far as the Mongaraka, it would be a great point gained; although I am persuaded you should not let anything interfere with your purchasing the whole of the Block comprised between the North bank of the Waitara, and the South bank of the Oranui rivers. It is a level district, and a rich soil, chiefly fern, which is now so much desired. We find the small native reserves a great pest, and the source of constant disagreements. It would be very desirable, if practicable, to induce them to abandon all those included within the Town. In fact, it would be advisable to confine them to one spot as much as possible.

August 1st.



The "Lucy James" arrived from Manakau yesterday; and it is expected she will sail to-night for Wellington. If so, Rawiri and a native friend of his, will take a passage in her.

You will have received an Account before this reaches you, that William Stewart has been suspended. His former derilicitions had not been made known to me, and I supposed him to be one of the most sober and trustworthy men in the Force. With regard to Medland, I am at a loss to advise, but think he would make you a most excellent clerk, as he writes a good hand, and is remarkably quick, besides being tolerably versed in figures.

I have only to repeat that I hope you endeavoured to procure us land at New Plymouth, and that your endeavours may be crowned with success; price not to be a consideration.

All desire their kind regards.


Yours truly (Signed)
Henry King.
To:- Donald McLean Esq.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry King, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0374 (73 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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