Object #1004510 from MS-Papers-0032-0818

6 pages written 14 Jul 1868 by Archibald John McLean in Glenorchy to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0818 (112 digitised items). Letters written from Maraekakaho, Warleigh, Doonside and Glenorchy about station matters and family news.Letter dated 24 Oct 1874 recounts the McLean family's lineage and gives dates of birth for family members

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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English (MD)

4 July 1868

Glenorchy

My dear Donald

I was sorry I went down till the Councel was over as you were so much taken up. I certainly would not have gone only I had a good deal to say and explain to you for your own interest as well as my own. I am grieved to the heart every day to see many things going as they should not go and the place full of idle people and half of their time doing nothing or what they do do is nothing to what they might

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English (MD)

if properly looked after. It is vigilence that is wanted and not always away from the place. If I had any power to interfear of course in Alexr absence I would see that work would be done on the places and the people would know that they could not idle their time away. As for this matter I have said so much about it that it is usless for me to say more as for a long time I have not been taken no nottice of altho all I try to do and say is from my heart and in fact it is destroying my piece of mind when I go and see so many idle and playing themselves and me working like a slave and no power to say a word to direct them. What to do. I supose Twigg has written you that three of the imported ewes was ill from the efects of cold and one of them is died and the other two are getting well and I hope will come through. The eldest of the McLean lads I had up here with me for a few days and I think a very superior young man. I believe he is going to a boundary and I am certain he will do his duty. They are both fine young men, in fact I am convinced you will be pleased with this one for he has such good address and more than that I think a

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English (MD)

sterling lad and well acquainted with stock.

I must now state how matters are with myself. I have been repairing the fences and looking after my cattle and planting trees so that I think the best thing I can do is to remain where I am for to remove from here only intails expences and poor as the land is with industry I may make a living out of it and to build a house on it is better than being the means of destroying my poor wife's piece of mind forever. She is completely broaken hearted and feels her position lately dreadfully for she is beginning to dispair and I do not know

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English (MD)

what to do. She works just as hard as I do as you know and it does not do to vasilate to long. I have kept her spirits up till now but since I came home this time she is completely cast down when I said we would hold out a little longer. Beside the price of timber is going up and they say likely to go up more. I would like to see you before you go to the General Assembly and have a thorough understanding. I find that Williams at the Big Bush is now very anxious to come into your way as he finds he is beginning to find himself in a mess as he had to gave bills to Mr Kinross

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English (MD)

to meet the crisis and he is afraid he cannot be able to manage to work through. That is what he told me without your assistance but I must tell you I do not think a great deal of him as a man to manage without means. Do write me and gave me your best advice or say to come down before you go. I am glade you are going to shut the place up and I think the old man, from what I could see, is a very proper one to leave in charge. I cannot say any more but hope that Alexr is not gaving you trouble as he is not come home as yet and I fear something is wrong. On Saturday night Alex came home I hear and the McLean lad went to the boundary on Monday.


Your affectionate brother
Archibald John McLean

English (MD)

4 July 1868

Glenorchy

My dear Donald

I was sorry I went down till the Councel was over as you were so much taken up. I certainly would not have gone only I had a good deal to say and explain to you for your own interest as well as my own. I am grieved to the heart every day to see many things going as they should not go and the place full of idle people and half of their time doing nothing or what they do do is nothing to what they might if properly looked after. It is vigilence that is wanted and not always away from the place. If I had any power to interfear of course in Alexr absence I would see that work would be done on the places and the people would know that they could not idle their time away. As for this matter I have said so much about it that it is usless for me to say more as for a long time I have not been taken no nottice of altho all I try to do and say is from my heart and in fact it is destroying my piece of mind when I go and see so many idle and playing themselves and me working like a slave and no power to say a word to direct them. What to do. I supose Twigg has written you that three of the imported ewes was ill from the efects of cold and one of them is died and the other two are getting well and I hope will come through. The eldest of the McLean lads I had up here with me for a few days and I think a very superior young man. I believe he is going to a boundary and I am certain he will do his duty. They are both fine young men, in fact I am convinced you will be pleased with this one for he has such good address and more than that I think a sterling lad and well acquainted with stock.

I must now state how matters are with myself. I have been repairing the fences and looking after my cattle and planting trees so that I think the best thing I can do is to remain where I am for to remove from here only intails expences and poor as the land is with industry I may make a living out of it and to build a house on it is better than being the means of destroying my poor wife's piece of mind forever. She is completely broaken hearted and feels her position lately dreadfully for she is beginning to dispair and I do not know what to do. She works just as hard as I do as you know and it does not do to vasilate to long. I have kept her spirits up till now but since I came home this time she is completely cast down when I said we would hold out a little longer. Beside the price of timber is going up and they say likely to go up more. I would like to see you before you go to the General Assembly and have a thorough understanding. I find that Williams at the Big Bush is now very anxious to come into your way as he finds he is beginning to find himself in a mess as he had to gave bills to Mr Kinross to meet the crisis and he is afraid he cannot be able to manage to work through. That is what he told me without your assistance but I must tell you I do not think a great deal of him as a man to manage without means. Do write me and gave me your best advice or say to come down before you go. I am glade you are going to shut the place up and I think the old man, from what I could see, is a very proper one to leave in charge. I cannot say any more but hope that Alexr is not gaving you trouble as he is not come home as yet and I fear something is wrong. On Saturday night Alex came home I hear and the McLean lad went to the boundary on Monday.


Your affectionate brother
Archibald John McLean

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Archibald John McLean (brother), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0818 (112 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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