Object #1004302 from MS-Papers-0032-0827

6 pages written 30 Sep 1851 by Sir Donald McLean to Susan Douglas McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0827 (34 digitised items). Letters between Donald McLean and Susan. Donald's letters written from Hawke's Bay, Rangitikei, Taita and Wairapapa. Susan's letters from Dalmuir Hill, Wellington (the home of her parents (Robert and Susannah Strang).

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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Page 1 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

Tuesday night Taita
30 Septr 1851


My dearest Pet

I trust your crying fit did not last long after I left. Feel assured Pussy that I cannot help feeling the extreme affection you evince towards me and I sincerely trust that I shall ever prove equally dutiful to you however cold I may at times appear. Here I am darling where we spent such a

Page 2 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

truly happy fortnight. Mrs Buck has been kindly enquiring for you and she promises to send you fowls for Mama occasionally although she will not part with them to anyone else. I asked her to go and see you when she goes to town. I confess to you that I have a great liking for her and her delightful house. The time we spent here together was the happiest I ever enjoyed since I left home for here I did feel that now I had a bosom friend and should the cold calculating envious world desert me she at least would ever prove a faithful affectionate and true friend. Papa promised to call and see you. I feel certain that his attention towards you during my absence will be quite in character with his usual affection

Page 3 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

and kindness to his only child. May you never forget the obligations you are under to such worthy parents and do not suppose that your union with me is in the slightest way to interfere with or diminish your respect and esteem for them. I wish it was only in our power to do anything to alleviate poor Mama's illness and pain. I do trust you will get her down with you to the cottage. I shall feel

Page 4 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

quite happy when I hear she has come that far. Give my love to her and tell her that I shall feel very anxious till I hear that she is able to come and pay you a visit. I could write you a very long letter puss even although we are but a few hours separated were I to indulge my feelings but I must stop dear. It is past 10 and I leave at 5 am tomorrow. We

Page 5 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

are very comfortable so far and all is going on well. You forgot my brush with the glass. Never mind it, everything else seems correct.

Remember me to Jessie. Tell Papa to supply you with whatever money you require. Get a bonnet and new summer dress for yourself. Pay for the firewood to the man who sells it near the Police Barracks at Kumutoto. Write me often. Do not above all neglect your duty to God. Under every little trial place your reliance in Him who is alone able to comfort and support you, and to whose care and protection I now my dearest wife commend you, and believe me ever your own affectionate


Donald McLean

Page 6 of 6. View high-resolution image

English (MD)


[on verso] Judging from what I feel at being separated from you you may rest satisfied I shall not be longer absent than I can possibly help - so you must sleep sound tomorrow night, read some amusing books or get through your favourite Charlemange or any other you fancy but be sure not to think of the nonsense I often bothered you with when dressing that hair of yours instead of reading or rather thinking of what you read.

English (MD)

Tuesday night Taita
30 Septr 1851


My dearest Pet

I trust your crying fit did not last long after I left. Feel assured Pussy that I cannot help feeling the extreme affection you evince towards me and I sincerely trust that I shall ever prove equally dutiful to you however cold I may at times appear. Here I am darling where we spent such a truly happy fortnight. Mrs Buck has been kindly enquiring for you and she promises to send you fowls for Mama occasionally although she will not part with them to anyone else. I asked her to go and see you when she goes to town. I confess to you that I have a great liking for her and her delightful house. The time we spent here together was the happiest I ever enjoyed since I left home for here I did feel that now I had a bosom friend and should the cold calculating envious world desert me she at least would ever prove a faithful affectionate and true friend. Papa promised to call and see you. I feel certain that his attention towards you during my absence will be quite in character with his usual affection and kindness to his only child. May you never forget the obligations you are under to such worthy parents and do not suppose that your union with me is in the slightest way to interfere with or diminish your respect and esteem for them. I wish it was only in our power to do anything to alleviate poor Mama's illness and pain. I do trust you will get her down with you to the cottage. I shall feel quite happy when I hear she has come that far. Give my love to her and tell her that I shall feel very anxious till I hear that she is able to come and pay you a visit. I could write you a very long letter puss even although we are but a few hours separated were I to indulge my feelings but I must stop dear. It is past 10 and I leave at 5 am tomorrow. We are very comfortable so far and all is going on well. You forgot my brush with the glass. Never mind it, everything else seems correct.

Remember me to Jessie. Tell Papa to supply you with whatever money you require. Get a bonnet and new summer dress for yourself. Pay for the firewood to the man who sells it near the Police Barracks at Kumutoto. Write me often. Do not above all neglect your duty to God. Under every little trial place your reliance in Him who is alone able to comfort and support you, and to whose care and protection I now my dearest wife commend you, and believe me ever your own affectionate


Donald McLean

[on verso] Judging from what I feel at being separated from you you may rest satisfied I shall not be longer absent than I can possibly help - so you must sleep sound tomorrow night, read some amusing books or get through your favourite Charlemange or any other you fancy but be sure not to think of the nonsense I often bothered you with when dressing that hair of yours instead of reading or rather thinking of what you read.

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0827 (34 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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