Object #1003993 from MS-Papers-0032-0827

5 pages written 1851 by Susan Douglas McLean in Wellington to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0827 (34 digitised items). Letters between Donald McLean and Susan. Donald's letters written from Hawke's Bay, Rangitikei, Taita and Wairapapa. Susan's letters from Dalmuir Hill, Wellington (the home of her parents (Robert and Susannah Strang).

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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Page 1 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
November 11th 1851


My dearest Donald

I was dreadfully disappointed when the 'Rose' came in last Friday without bringing me a letter from you. I had been looking forward so anxiously for its arrival and as it was so long of coming I felt certain that it could not have left Ahuriri before you arrived there. When Papa came home and told me that there were no letters as you were not there when it left but that the Captain heard that you were within a day's journey I felt so disappointed that I went and cried for more than an hour. It was most annoying to think that if the vessel had only remained

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English (MD)

another day I would most likely have heard from my darling husband. The 'Rose' is going to sail on Thursday but I hope that before it arrives at Ahuriri you will be on your way home. You have now been gone love more than six weeks and I trust it will not be long now till I see you again in case however you should be detained at Ahuriri I think it will be as well to write for I know you would be disappointed if you did not hear from me. Papa tells me that there are some despatches at his office which he must send to you and from what he told me I am afraid they may detain you longer. I trust you will have left before the vessel gets up for it will be really dreadful if you are kept away much longer from me. Do not darling, unless it is something very important, stay. I would not feel it so much if poor Mama was well but I feel now so much the need of comfort from my dear

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English (MD)

husband. Do come in dearest and never mind the despatches. I am sure the Governor never would be so unreasonable as to ask you to stay away from your wife so long. It would be too bad if he did, seeing that we have only been married eleven weeks, four of which you have been away. I am sure however you will not stay longer than you can help for I know that you are anxious to get home again to your little slave. I am happy to tell you that dear Mama is much better since the fine weather commenced. Dr Featherston is surprised to see the change in her but she is still very weak. She cannot walk across the room without assistance. For several weeks she was unable to leave her bed but now she is able to leave her [crossed out] sit up for two or three hours. By the letters that you will receive along with this which were written some weeks ago you will hear that I am staying with Mama altogether. It is much better that I am with her as she requires so

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English (MD)

much attention. I am sure love that I cannot do too much for her. Many a sleepless night has she had watching me in sickness. If I could do anything to relieve her how happy I should be. John McKenzie, Jessie's brother, called here a few days ago and as he told me that you were to call at his house on your way home I sent a letter by him in which I told you that I had not been very well for a few days. I did not intend to say anything about it in this letter but I have thought since that it will be as well to do so for if you are still at Ahuriri you are almost sure to have it and perhaps you may be uneasy about me. There was nothing particularly wrong with me. It was only grief for Mama's illness and fatigue. The walk up here every morning which I had before I came to stay was too much for me. You need not love feel the least uneasy for I am now quite as well as I was before. I get on very slowly with your slippers. I have so little time

Page 5 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

just now. I am sure you will like them for what I have done looks very pretty. I must now bid you goodbye my own darling husband. Mama sends her kindest love. May God bless and protect you my dearest Donald and believe me ever to be


Your affectionate wife
Susan D McLean

English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
November 11th 1851


My dearest Donald

I was dreadfully disappointed when the 'Rose' came in last Friday without bringing me a letter from you. I had been looking forward so anxiously for its arrival and as it was so long of coming I felt certain that it could not have left Ahuriri before you arrived there. When Papa came home and told me that there were no letters as you were not there when it left but that the Captain heard that you were within a day's journey I felt so disappointed that I went and cried for more than an hour. It was most annoying to think that if the vessel had only remained another day I would most likely have heard from my darling husband. The 'Rose' is going to sail on Thursday but I hope that before it arrives at Ahuriri you will be on your way home. You have now been gone love more than six weeks and I trust it will not be long now till I see you again in case however you should be detained at Ahuriri I think it will be as well to write for I know you would be disappointed if you did not hear from me. Papa tells me that there are some despatches at his office which he must send to you and from what he told me I am afraid they may detain you longer. I trust you will have left before the vessel gets up for it will be really dreadful if you are kept away much longer from me. Do not darling, unless it is something very important, stay. I would not feel it so much if poor Mama was well but I feel now so much the need of comfort from my dear husband. Do come in dearest and never mind the despatches. I am sure the Governor never would be so unreasonable as to ask you to stay away from your wife so long. It would be too bad if he did, seeing that we have only been married eleven weeks, four of which you have been away. I am sure however you will not stay longer than you can help for I know that you are anxious to get home again to your little slave. I am happy to tell you that dear Mama is much better since the fine weather commenced. Dr Featherston is surprised to see the change in her but she is still very weak. She cannot walk across the room without assistance. For several weeks she was unable to leave her bed but now she is able to leave her [crossed out] sit up for two or three hours. By the letters that you will receive along with this which were written some weeks ago you will hear that I am staying with Mama altogether. It is much better that I am with her as she requires so much attention. I am sure love that I cannot do too much for her. Many a sleepless night has she had watching me in sickness. If I could do anything to relieve her how happy I should be. John McKenzie, Jessie's brother, called here a few days ago and as he told me that you were to call at his house on your way home I sent a letter by him in which I told you that I had not been very well for a few days. I did not intend to say anything about it in this letter but I have thought since that it will be as well to do so for if you are still at Ahuriri you are almost sure to have it and perhaps you may be uneasy about me. There was nothing particularly wrong with me. It was only grief for Mama's illness and fatigue. The walk up here every morning which I had before I came to stay was too much for me. You need not love feel the least uneasy for I am now quite as well as I was before. I get on very slowly with your slippers. I have so little time just now. I am sure you will like them for what I have done looks very pretty. I must now bid you goodbye my own darling husband. Mama sends her kindest love. May God bless and protect you my dearest Donald and believe me ever to be


Your affectionate wife
Susan D McLean

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0827 (34 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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