Object #1003877 from MS-Papers-0032-0816

4 pages written 20 Jan 1861 by Annabella McLean in Glenorchy to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Annabella McLean (sister), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0816 (50 digitised items). Letters written from Scotland (Edinburgh, Glenorchy Manse, Stranraer) prior to her arrival in New Zealand in Jan 1864 on the Wild Duck; afterwards from Maraekakaho, Napier and Wellington. One letter was written in Sep 1858 during a visit to her sister Flora Ann Conway in North Wales.

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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English (MD)

Manse of Glenorchy
Jany 20th/61


My dear brother

I write a few lines to acknowledge yours of the 20th Oct which Uncle thought good and consid[ered] to be published in the "Glasgow Herald". I think it ... to send you the paper as perhaps it was not altogether orthodox to do so since the sentiments were unfavourable to the natives to whom no doubt you still return a friendly feeling. I cannot but

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English (MD)

think but that they have been much aggrieved and little tolerance shown for what was most probably the poor native's misapprehension of what was to be their ultimate interest. There is nothing of much importance going on here at present. We spent a very quiet Christmas, an occasional dinner party is all that breaks the monotony of time. We expect Captain McDougall Ardincaple on a visit with several others this week. We have had a most severe winter, heavy falls of snow with intense frost. Aunt Helen is not much better, indeed she is quiet a subject for an asylum but Uncle fears the expense. I find Mr McLean & family Iver Manse most delightful society but Uncle gets a little piqued if I go too often. I have commenced a Sabbath School for the children of the parish which is gradually increasing. It has been sadly lost for want of judicious female influence amongst his people which for a clergyman is indispensable.

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English (MD)

My dear sisters will now I hope be safely landed at their future abode. May God grant that my most sanguine hopes requesting them may be fully realised. I surely miss Catherine. She was all the mother I ever knew. I have no one now to whom I can go with all my thoughts and wishes. The war is now coming to an end which I hope will speed your movements. This will have proved a fruitful period for taking notes for the anticipated volume when am I to have

English (MD)

Manse of Glenorchy
Jany 20th/61


My dear brother

I write a few lines to acknowledge yours of the 20th Oct which Uncle thought good and consid[ered] to be published in the "Glasgow Herald". I think it ... to send you the paper as perhaps it was not altogether orthodox to do so since the sentiments were unfavourable to the natives to whom no doubt you still return a friendly feeling. I cannot but think but that they have been much aggrieved and little tolerance shown for what was most probably the poor native's misapprehension of what was to be their ultimate interest. There is nothing of much importance going on here at present. We spent a very quiet Christmas, an occasional dinner party is all that breaks the monotony of time. We expect Captain McDougall Ardincaple on a visit with several others this week. We have had a most severe winter, heavy falls of snow with intense frost. Aunt Helen is not much better, indeed she is quiet a subject for an asylum but Uncle fears the expense. I find Mr McLean & family Iver Manse most delightful society but Uncle gets a little piqued if I go too often. I have commenced a Sabbath School for the children of the parish which is gradually increasing. It has been sadly lost for want of judicious female influence amongst his people which for a clergyman is indispensable. My dear sisters will now I hope be safely landed at their future abode. May God grant that my most sanguine hopes requesting them may be fully realised. I surely miss Catherine. She was all the mother I ever knew. I have no one now to whom I can go with all my thoughts and wishes. The war is now coming to an end which I hope will speed your movements. This will have proved a fruitful period for taking notes for the anticipated volume when am I to have the honorable position of sitting by your side greatly assisting you by constant mistakes. I am reading and studying here most systematically & as I find Aunt a great charge I am longing much to hear from you. I enclose a letter from little Douglas. I hope it will amuse him. With the usual compliments of the Season.

I remain my dear brother


Your afft. sister
Annabella McLean

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Annabella McLean (sister), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0816 (50 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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