Object #1003465 from MS-Papers-0032-0018

4 pages written 20 Apr 1865 by Samuel Locke in Wairoa to Sir Donald McLean in Napier City

From: Superintendent, Hawkes Bay and Government Agent, East Coast - Papers, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0018 (58 digitised items). Paper about McLean taking several notable Maori including Wi Taki Ngatata and Matene Te Whiwhi to Turanga (1865), to determine the Maori attitude towards the Paimarire religion.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

COPY. Wairoa
April 20th. 1865.


Sir,

I beg to forward, enclosed, a Report of a Native Meeting held at the Uhi pa, on the Waiwa, on Monday 17th., and Tuesday 18th.; also the speeches of both parties on the occasion, with the translations; also a letter from Kopu, containing the speeches., etc. for publication in the Waka Maori.

The Hau Hau party, at the time of their leaving Turanga, it appears, did not muster many followers; the majority of those who caused the disturbance at Turanga, either stopping behind, or returning to Opotiki by another route. This party is led by a man called Bonaparte (their prophet), and another named Watene, formerly a Minister on the Waikato, who seems to be the cleverest man in their party. These two men, with a few followers, stayed for a time at Maraetaha, to gain followers. From thence they marched to the Mahia and Nukutauroa; where they stopped for some days, going through their ceremonies, which they laugh at themselves, - and recruiting. From what, at present, I can ascertain, they did not succeed in gaining many immediate

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English (ATL)

followers there; but they have succeeded in upsetting the native mind in that district, and disorganising all the hapus; so that the lowest rogue is looked upon as the cleverest man.

They then proceeded to Nuhaka; where they were met by Ihaka Waanga and his followers; who withstood all temptations. Too much praise cannot be bestowed upon on Ihaka; for the manner in which he resisted these people, and defeated all their arguments. But they succeeded in gaining over Matenga Tukareahi; who has since been one of their principal advisers, and now wishes them to leave some luis (Jews) in this district to teach the people.

On leaving Nuhaka, they proceeded to Waakaki; where they were joined by the Waru, and all the inland natives; and on Monday, 17th. arrived at the Wairoa, to the number of about three to four hundred.

Early on Monday morning, I proceeded with Kopu to visit the different Chiefs on the river, and to make arrangements for meeting the Hau Hau (i. e. I am that I am).

About nine o'clock the Friendly Natives collected the pa of Paora Apatu; when it was arranged that the Friendly Natives should march to the Uhi, all armed; and that the Europeans should all stop on the right bank of the river, near the Stockade; but that there should be no unnecessary show: All of which plans were carried out. But on arriving at the Uhi pa, and waiting for some time, the natives retired to Paora

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English (ATL)

Apatu's pa; first setting a guard on both sides of the river.

The next morning, 18th., the Friendly Natives again collected, numbering about one hundred and fifty, under arms; but many more were in readiness, should necessity require.

We marched up to near the flag-staff. The Friendly Chiefs present were Kopu, Paora Apatu, Haunana Taepa, Maehe Kaimoana, Haparona, Kohea and others.

Hamana commenced by speaking the enclosed speech. He was followed by Maehe; and then Kopu spoke at great length. I am sorry to say that I have not been able to collect all his speech, as it is with Ihaka Waanga, at the Mahia; so write Kopu here; for it is owing to their staunch loyalty, and known bravery, that keeps together the natives of this district.

Nothing has yet transpired that would lead me to suppose that there is any likelihood of an outbreak here at present; but at the same time, I cannot too strongly recommend precaution; for although the Hau Haus are compelled to leave here for some time, some of them intend stopping at Wakaki, and others at Wani's pa; and it is more their underhand cunning and dissimulation that requires guarding against, than their open hostility at present. At the same time, I must state that if the Government had not taken the precautions they have done in this district, by arming a few of the

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English (ATL)

loyal natives, and sending up the Stockade and volunteers,- so as to show a bold and determined front, - that I should not be now able to make so favourable a report.

There has been a small native police force organised, of ten men, to perform duty as long as the enemy are in this district; which I hope will meet with your approval.

I have the honor to be, Sir,
Your obedient servant, (Signed)
Samuel Locke.
To:- His Honor, Donald McLean, Napier.

English (ATL)

COPY. Wairoa
April 20th. 1865.


Sir,

I beg to forward, enclosed, a Report of a Native Meeting held at the Uhi pa, on the Waiwa, on Monday 17th., and Tuesday 18th.; also the speeches of both parties on the occasion, with the translations; also a letter from Kopu, containing the speeches., etc. for publication in the Waka Maori.

The Hau Hau party, at the time of their leaving Turanga, it appears, did not muster many followers; the majority of those who caused the disturbance at Turanga, either stopping behind, or returning to Opotiki by another route. This party is led by a man called Bonaparte (their prophet), and another named Watene, formerly a Minister on the Waikato, who seems to be the cleverest man in their party. These two men, with a few followers, stayed for a time at Maraetaha, to gain followers. From thence they marched to the Mahia and Nukutauroa; where they stopped for some days, going through their ceremonies, which they laugh at themselves, - and recruiting. From what, at present, I can ascertain, they did not succeed in gaining many immediate followers there; but they have succeeded in upsetting the native mind in that district, and disorganising all the hapus; so that the lowest rogue is looked upon as the cleverest man.

They then proceeded to Nuhaka; where they were met by Ihaka Waanga and his followers; who withstood all temptations. Too much praise cannot be bestowed upon on Ihaka; for the manner in which he resisted these people, and defeated all their arguments. But they succeeded in gaining over Matenga Tukareahi; who has since been one of their principal advisers, and now wishes them to leave some luis (Jews) in this district to teach the people.

On leaving Nuhaka, they proceeded to Waakaki; where they were joined by the Waru, and all the inland natives; and on Monday, 17th. arrived at the Wairoa, to the number of about three to four hundred.

Early on Monday morning, I proceeded with Kopu to visit the different Chiefs on the river, and to make arrangements for meeting the Hau Hau (i. e. I am that I am).

About nine o'clock the Friendly Natives collected the pa of Paora Apatu; when it was arranged that the Friendly Natives should march to the Uhi, all armed; and that the Europeans should all stop on the right bank of the river, near the Stockade; but that there should be no unnecessary show: All of which plans were carried out. But on arriving at the Uhi pa, and waiting for some time, the natives retired to Paora Apatu's pa; first setting a guard on both sides of the river.

The next morning, 18th., the Friendly Natives again collected, numbering about one hundred and fifty, under arms; but many more were in readiness, should necessity require.

We marched up to near the flag-staff. The Friendly Chiefs present were Kopu, Paora Apatu, Haunana Taepa, Maehe Kaimoana, Haparona, Kohea and others.

Hamana commenced by speaking the enclosed speech. He was followed by Maehe; and then Kopu spoke at great length. I am sorry to say that I have not been able to collect all his speech, as it is with Ihaka Waanga, at the Mahia; so write Kopu here; for it is owing to their staunch loyalty, and known bravery, that keeps together the natives of this district.

Nothing has yet transpired that would lead me to suppose that there is any likelihood of an outbreak here at present; but at the same time, I cannot too strongly recommend precaution; for although the Hau Haus are compelled to leave here for some time, some of them intend stopping at Wakaki, and others at Wani's pa; and it is more their underhand cunning and dissimulation that requires guarding against, than their open hostility at present. At the same time, I must state that if the Government had not taken the precautions they have done in this district, by arming a few of the loyal natives, and sending up the Stockade and volunteers,- so as to show a bold and determined front, - that I should not be now able to make so favourable a report.

There has been a small native police force organised, of ten men, to perform duty as long as the enemy are in this district; which I hope will meet with your approval.

I have the honor to be, Sir,
Your obedient servant, (Signed)
Samuel Locke.
To:- His Honor, Donald McLean, Napier.

Part of:
Superintendent, Hawkes Bay and Government Agent, East Coast - Papers, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0018 (58 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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