Object #1003150 from MS-Papers-0032-0827

5 pages written 7 Feb 1851 by Susan Douglas McLean in Wellington to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0827 (34 digitised items). Letters between Donald McLean and Susan. Donald's letters written from Hawke's Bay, Rangitikei, Taita and Wairapapa. Susan's letters from Dalmuir Hill, Wellington (the home of her parents (Robert and Susannah Strang).

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
February 7th 1851


My dear Mr McLean

I have just finished a letter to Mama's cousin Mrs Lupton and I must now write to you as I hear that the 'Rose' sails either tomorrow or Monday. Received your letter with very great pleasure and I was glad to hear that although you could not tell exactly when you would return still you would not be away six months longer as I was told you were to be. The thoughts of not seeing you for such a long time really made me quite miserable for some days after I heard

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English (MD)

this. I have heard no news since I wrote last except that a vessel arrived a few days ago direct from England by which Mrs Johnston had letters from her sister Mrs Inglis. At the time she wrote she did not think that they would return. I shall be sorry if they do not for Mrs Inglis is such a nice person.

Mr Kirton had a letter from Mr Hervey. I have not heard whether he intends to return or not. I am getting on with the "History of Charles the Fifth" pretty well. I like it very much. It is so interesting. I am reading another very nice book just now. Mrs Ellis' "Women of England" perhaps you have heard of it. It is a beautifully written work and full of instruction. I have not finished Rollin yet. Mama lent the eighth volume some months ago to an old servant

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English (MD)

of ours who lives at the Hutt. He was down here lately and I asked him to return it but he has not done so yet. It is very annoying to read part of a work and not be able to finish it. Papa borrowed a book yesterday which I would like very much to read. It is Macaulay's "History of England" but as he is only to have it for a few days. I will not be able to do so. He may perhaps get it for me again however when I was at Mrs Kirton's a few days ago she asked me if I would assist in teaching the children at the Sunday school. I would be very happy to do so if it were not that I have been in the habit for a long time of spending the afternoon with Mrs Stokes, and I would not like now when Mrs Stokes is in such bad health to give up going. I am sure she would think it very unkind. The reason she wishes me to spend a few hours

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English (MD)

with her on Sunday is that the servant is out and Mr Stokes always goes for a walk and she says that when she is left alone she gets quite nervous. I think also that it would be scarcely worth while to begin teaching now as I would soon be obliged to give it up. When you write tell me whether I ought to do it or not. I shall do what you think best. Mama has not been well lately. She complains a good deal of rheumatism. I think if she would go out a little she would be much better. I shall try and persuade her to go with me next week to pay some visits.

Mrs Kirton told me that in your letter to the Minister you mention having hurt your foot. Why did you not tell me & I suppose you thought that if you said

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English (MD)

anything about it I would imagine that you were very much hurt and would begin to feel about it. I am glad that it is better for it is very disagreeable to have anything wrong with the foot. Do you remember the sprain I got soon after your return from Taranaki. You are really a very good doctor. If it had not been for your cure I do not think it would have got well so soon. I must now conclude for I am so sleepy I can scarcely see to write. It is very late or rather early. I am sure it must be two in the morning for it was very late when I began to write. Good bye dear


and believe me ever to remain
Your very affectionate
Susan Douglas Strang

[Note on transcription: 'The Women of England', written by Sarah Stickney Ellis (1812-1872).]

English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
February 7th 1851


My dear Mr McLean

I have just finished a letter to Mama's cousin Mrs Lupton and I must now write to you as I hear that the 'Rose' sails either tomorrow or Monday. Received your letter with very great pleasure and I was glad to hear that although you could not tell exactly when you would return still you would not be away six months longer as I was told you were to be. The thoughts of not seeing you for such a long time really made me quite miserable for some days after I heard this. I have heard no news since I wrote last except that a vessel arrived a few days ago direct from England by which Mrs Johnston had letters from her sister Mrs Inglis. At the time she wrote she did not think that they would return. I shall be sorry if they do not for Mrs Inglis is such a nice person.

Mr Kirton had a letter from Mr Hervey. I have not heard whether he intends to return or not. I am getting on with the "History of Charles the Fifth" pretty well. I like it very much. It is so interesting. I am reading another very nice book just now. Mrs Ellis' "Women of England" perhaps you have heard of it. It is a beautifully written work and full of instruction. I have not finished Rollin yet. Mama lent the eighth volume some months ago to an old servant of ours who lives at the Hutt. He was down here lately and I asked him to return it but he has not done so yet. It is very annoying to read part of a work and not be able to finish it. Papa borrowed a book yesterday which I would like very much to read. It is Macaulay's "History of England" but as he is only to have it for a few days. I will not be able to do so. He may perhaps get it for me again however when I was at Mrs Kirton's a few days ago she asked me if I would assist in teaching the children at the Sunday school. I would be very happy to do so if it were not that I have been in the habit for a long time of spending the afternoon with Mrs Stokes, and I would not like now when Mrs Stokes is in such bad health to give up going. I am sure she would think it very unkind. The reason she wishes me to spend a few hours with her on Sunday is that the servant is out and Mr Stokes always goes for a walk and she says that when she is left alone she gets quite nervous. I think also that it would be scarcely worth while to begin teaching now as I would soon be obliged to give it up. When you write tell me whether I ought to do it or not. I shall do what you think best. Mama has not been well lately. She complains a good deal of rheumatism. I think if she would go out a little she would be much better. I shall try and persuade her to go with me next week to pay some visits.

Mrs Kirton told me that in your letter to the Minister you mention having hurt your foot. Why did you not tell me & I suppose you thought that if you said anything about it I would imagine that you were very much hurt and would begin to feel about it. I am glad that it is better for it is very disagreeable to have anything wrong with the foot. Do you remember the sprain I got soon after your return from Taranaki. You are really a very good doctor. If it had not been for your cure I do not think it would have got well so soon. I must now conclude for I am so sleepy I can scarcely see to write. It is very late or rather early. I am sure it must be two in the morning for it was very late when I began to write. Good bye dear


and believe me ever to remain
Your very affectionate
Susan Douglas Strang

[Note on transcription: 'The Women of England', written by Sarah Stickney Ellis (1812-1872).]

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0827 (34 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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