Object #1003078 from MS-Papers-0032-0276

4 pages written 20 May 1854 by Josiah Flight in New Plymouth District to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Josiah Flight, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0276 (45 digitised items). 43 letters addressed from Mangoraka, Te Ika Moana, Resident Magistrate's Office, New Plymouth, Henui, 1846-1872, and undated. Also letter from A D Flight, 6 Mar [187-], New Plymouth to Sir Donald McLean; letter from Josiah Flight to Thomas Kelly, 22 Jul 1870 re Cape Egmont Flax CompanyAlso poem addressed to `My dear Donald McLean' entitled `No Land' (on verso) written by Josiah Flight

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

New Plymouth,
20th May, 1854.


My dear Sir,

Mr.Cooper tells me he has written to you fully on the unfortunate occurrence that has taken place at Katatore's Pah; and that he has expressed in his letter to you the strong conviction he has on his mind that a solemn judicial enquiry should be made here by a sitting of the Supreme Court to try the case in this Province. The progress that has already been made in bringing the Natives to submit to our laws, should lead us in a case like the present to spare neither expence or trouble to further enlighten them in the principles of English law especially where the protection of life is involved. I trust therefore that the officer Administering the Government will direct one of the Judges to hold a sitting of the Supreme Court at as an early a period as possible for the trial of the prisoner. The difficulty of making the Natives understand the grades of guilt where death has been caused by the hand of one against another would I believe be somewhat overcome by such a trial taking place here rather than elsewhere, whilst they would have a most convincing proof placed before them of

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English (ATL)

the jealous care with which our laws guard the life of every individual within its controul.

Mr. H. Halse informs me that he has the offer of some situation which would remove him from this province. My feeling of the value his services in this Settlement would lead me to beg you to reconsider this matter that so the necessity of forming and keeping up a sufficiently effective staff of officers acting with and for the Natives in this part might be well weighed before an officer so useful in the prevention or the settlement of disputes between Natives and Europeans be removed. Though I would not say a word to prejudice Mr. Halse's claim to an advance in the Service, yet I certainly would if it were possible keep him in this Province where his services are so important but where he does not receive a sufficient remuneration for them. Could he be attached to Mr.Cooper's Deptment whilst holding his present situation with Police and likewise continue to act as Interpreter I think salaries might be given to make it worth his whole to remain where he now is. You know how anxioualy I feel for the continuance of friendly

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English (ATL)

relations with the natives; and I fear that a fresh Sub Inspector would make but sorry work in dealing with matters which Mr.Halse is able to arrange with ease. The part to which Mr. Halse informs me he may be removed is I believe so far new that an officer sent there would be entering on a somewhat fresh sphere? Would it not therefore be desirable to send a fresh man there rather than take away from here an experienced officer (who would be fresh there) when it would be difficult to replace him? I trust you will forgive the freedom of my remarks on this matter.

Amongst Mr. Turton's Natives a Subscription has been set onfoot forerecting a Meeting House for their worship in the town - I am very glad to be able to tell you that several Europeans have joined in the Subscription which now amounts to nearly one hundred and thirty pounds.

Matters are going on here in their jog trot way the place is slowly improving but I believe our progress to be though slow yet sure. I hope you will have time to inform me whether any

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English (ATL)

thing is likely to be done in the better systematizing the land purchase and or Native business so as to keep a well organized piece of machinery constantly at work for the extinguishing of their titles.

Mrs.Flight desires to be very kindly remembered to you. I need not say how glad we shall be again to be favoured with your society; but believe me my dear Sir I hope at all times to be allowed to subscribe myself


Yours very faithfully,
Josiah Flight.
D. McLean,
Esq., J. P.

English (ATL)

New Plymouth,
20th May, 1854.


My dear Sir,

Mr.Cooper tells me he has written to you fully on the unfortunate occurrence that has taken place at Katatore's Pah; and that he has expressed in his letter to you the strong conviction he has on his mind that a solemn judicial enquiry should be made here by a sitting of the Supreme Court to try the case in this Province. The progress that has already been made in bringing the Natives to submit to our laws, should lead us in a case like the present to spare neither expence or trouble to further enlighten them in the principles of English law especially where the protection of life is involved. I trust therefore that the officer Administering the Government will direct one of the Judges to hold a sitting of the Supreme Court at as an early a period as possible for the trial of the prisoner. The difficulty of making the Natives understand the grades of guilt where death has been caused by the hand of one against another would I believe be somewhat overcome by such a trial taking place here rather than elsewhere, whilst they would have a most convincing proof placed before them of the jealous care with which our laws guard the life of every individual within its controul.

Mr. H. Halse informs me that he has the offer of some situation which would remove him from this province. My feeling of the value his services in this Settlement would lead me to beg you to reconsider this matter that so the necessity of forming and keeping up a sufficiently effective staff of officers acting with and for the Natives in this part might be well weighed before an officer so useful in the prevention or the settlement of disputes between Natives and Europeans be removed. Though I would not say a word to prejudice Mr. Halse's claim to an advance in the Service, yet I certainly would if it were possible keep him in this Province where his services are so important but where he does not receive a sufficient remuneration for them. Could he be attached to Mr.Cooper's Deptment whilst holding his present situation with Police and likewise continue to act as Interpreter I think salaries might be given to make it worth his whole to remain where he now is. You know how anxioualy I feel for the continuance of friendly relations with the natives; and I fear that a fresh Sub Inspector would make but sorry work in dealing with matters which Mr.Halse is able to arrange with ease. The part to which Mr. Halse informs me he may be removed is I believe so far new that an officer sent there would be entering on a somewhat fresh sphere? Would it not therefore be desirable to send a fresh man there rather than take away from here an experienced officer (who would be fresh there) when it would be difficult to replace him? I trust you will forgive the freedom of my remarks on this matter.

Amongst Mr. Turton's Natives a Subscription has been set onfoot forerecting a Meeting House for their worship in the town - I am very glad to be able to tell you that several Europeans have joined in the Subscription which now amounts to nearly one hundred and thirty pounds.

Matters are going on here in their jog trot way the place is slowly improving but I believe our progress to be though slow yet sure. I hope you will have time to inform me whether any thing is likely to be done in the better systematizing the land purchase and or Native business so as to keep a well organized piece of machinery constantly at work for the extinguishing of their titles.

Mrs.Flight desires to be very kindly remembered to you. I need not say how glad we shall be again to be favoured with your society; but believe me my dear Sir I hope at all times to be allowed to subscribe myself


Yours very faithfully,
Josiah Flight.
D. McLean,
Esq., J. P.

Part of:
Inward letters - Josiah Flight, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0276 (45 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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