Object #1002780 from MS-Papers-0032-0319

3 pages written 1 Aug 1856 by William Halse in Taranaki Region to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - William Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0319 (28 digitised items). 28 letters addressed from New Plymouth & Taranaki

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Taranaki
1st, August 1856.


My dear McLean,

The steamer came in early this morning. Native news you will get from my brother. From all I hear the Ngats are cowed, --- at least they have the worst of it. There is not that excitement now their first coming occasioned, and the natives on the other sides which embraces other tribes since the last skirmish, feel their advantage. Henry will also have informed you of my marriage, which came off on the 28th. ulto. Turton officiated, and spent the day with us, as did Mr. Ironside. It is a week since, and this short experience of the new state leads me to look forward to much happiness. Mr. Turton will, I believe, go down to Auckland in the steamer, and will talk over with you his

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English (ATL)

chances of a Commissionership of the management of Native Reserves. You know, I suppose, he has severed his connection with the Wesleyan Society, and only continued on the list of officiating Ministers for the purpose of marrying me to "one of the girls." He rents, I believe, the Mission lands; but farming is now precarious, and he must look to other sources if he remains in the Colony. Your opinion of his fitness for the new office will be the same as mine. It is one he could fill with the greatest ability, and without the tinge of partizanship, --- justifiable indeed, --- which made him regarded jealously at Head-Quarters, in the Native feud. I hope his visit will lead to a successful result. The Government may have a prejudice against him, on the report of others. But it is so little deserved that I should like to see him succeed as a matter of justice. Much, if not all, will depend on you and Richmond, and perhaps C. Brown. To Richmond I did intend to write, and promised Turton to do so. But on reflection the task seems delicate, as he is Colonial Secretary. If you like, you can read to him what I have written. The Superintendent and Turton are quite agreed on the Native quarrel; and if it be in his way will, I am sure, recommend Turton to the Governor.

We have the "Margaret" in from Auckland, but I do not know the news.


Yours sincerely (Signed)
W. Halse.
To:- Donald McLean.

English (ATL)

Taranaki
1st, August 1856.


My dear McLean,

The steamer came in early this morning. Native news you will get from my brother. From all I hear the Ngats are cowed, --- at least they have the worst of it. There is not that excitement now their first coming occasioned, and the natives on the other sides which embraces other tribes since the last skirmish, feel their advantage. Henry will also have informed you of my marriage, which came off on the 28th. ulto. Turton officiated, and spent the day with us, as did Mr. Ironside. It is a week since, and this short experience of the new state leads me to look forward to much happiness. Mr. Turton will, I believe, go down to Auckland in the steamer, and will talk over with you his chances of a Commissionership of the management of Native Reserves. You know, I suppose, he has severed his connection with the Wesleyan Society, and only continued on the list of officiating Ministers for the purpose of marrying me to "one of the girls." He rents, I believe, the Mission lands; but farming is now precarious, and he must look to other sources if he remains in the Colony. Your opinion of his fitness for the new office will be the same as mine. It is one he could fill with the greatest ability, and without the tinge of partizanship, --- justifiable indeed, --- which made him regarded jealously at Head-Quarters, in the Native feud. I hope his visit will lead to a successful result. The Government may have a prejudice against him, on the report of others. But it is so little deserved that I should like to see him succeed as a matter of justice. Much, if not all, will depend on you and Richmond, and perhaps C. Brown. To Richmond I did intend to write, and promised Turton to do so. But on reflection the task seems delicate, as he is Colonial Secretary. If you like, you can read to him what I have written. The Superintendent and Turton are quite agreed on the Native quarrel; and if it be in his way will, I am sure, recommend Turton to the Governor.

We have the "Margaret" in from Auckland, but I do not know the news.


Yours sincerely (Signed)
W. Halse.
To:- Donald McLean.

Part of:
Inward letters - William Halse, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0319 (28 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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