Object #1002520 from MS-Papers-0032-0534

2 pages written 6 Jan 1869 by James Crowe Richmond to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - J C Richmond, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0534 (35 digitised items). 33 letters written from Wellington, Turanganui, Ngatapa, Napier and Nelson, 1865-1870, & undated. Includes letter from Richmond to Ormond, Oct 1868; McLean to Richmond, 7 Jan 1869. Also piece-level inventory.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Our loss is:- 1 Officer killed; 1 wounded; 10 men killed; 10 wounded, only one dangerously. There was no feed in the Pa, and little ammunition in the pouches of the slain. Clothing, two or three watches, and about £50 in gold and silver have been taken; the remains of the plunder of Turanga. Hamlyn (?) was first in the Pa. We have 80 prisoners, - 14 men, the rest women and children. One of the men is believed to be deep in the murders. I hope to keep him alive for trial, but it is very hard to restrain our Ngatiporou friends, who do not appreciate the nature of a regular trial, and the value of a legal conviction of one or two in this case. I should like to obtain a conviction, to answer all cavillers about our action, If there are any still in the land. I cannot yet say how far our pursuit may be earried. I think the presence of Rangi-aho justifies a visit to Maungapohatu, if we can man-age it; but "its a far cry to Lochavar." It would be an enormous security for future peace. If we could get the place, and I doubt its being stronger than this, except in remoteness from our stores.

In haste
yours truly (Signed)
J.C. Richmond.
To:- His Honor D. McLean.

English (ATL)

Ngatapa
January 6th. 1869


My dear McLean,

We have taken Ngatapa. It is a place that Justified the hopes of Kooti, that he had a safe retreat. In my opinion, it is 1500 feet above the valley, and 2000 or more above the sea. It is a sort of wedge, with a deep gully up the gentlest slope; which, however, is a steep, wearisome ascent. The whole mountain was bush-covered, to the top. Kooti, and perhaps others before him, had cleared the very pinnacle. I endeavoured to burn off the light bush down the gentler slope, on the North Eastern side. The forest is continuous for miles, except where our road approaches; and heavy timber, except on the same side, where scrub 20 feet high, clothes it. The rear runs out in a ridge of rook, - a knife edge. The main force tapped up to the main front. Fraser scaled the rocky ridge in rear. We had not men enough to stop descent by the cliffs, on the right; and Kooti evacuated as our men got in. But 60 of his warriors were killed before he left; and our men have over- taken and killed 60 more. Among the dead are Nikora, and Rangiaho. It is likely that the latter led a body of 30 or 40 Urewera. These made a faint stand in the bush, whilst trying to escape, but Ngatiporou dispersed them, killing 18. The pursuit is being followed up to-day. Our loss is:- 1 Officer killed; 1 wounded; 10 men killed; 10 wounded, only one dangerously. There was no feed in the Pa, and little ammunition in the pouches of the slain. Clothing, two or three watches, and about £50 in gold and silver have been taken; the remains of the plunder of Turanga. Hamlyn (?) was first in the Pa. We have 80 prisoners, - 14 men, the rest women and children. One of the men is believed to be deep in the murders. I hope to keep him alive for trial, but it is very hard to restrain our Ngatiporou friends, who do not appreciate the nature of a regular trial, and the value of a legal conviction of one or two in this case. I should like to obtain a conviction, to answer all cavillers about our action, If there are any still in the land. I cannot yet say how far our pursuit may be earried. I think the presence of Rangi-aho justifies a visit to Maungapohatu, if we can man-age it; but "its a far cry to Lochavar." It would be an enormous security for future peace. If we could get the place, and I doubt its being stronger than this, except in remoteness from our stores.

In haste
yours truly (Signed)
J.C. Richmond.
To:- His Honor D. McLean.

Part of:
Inward letters - J C Richmond, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0534 (35 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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