Object #1002442 from MS-Papers-0032-0540

3 pages written 21 Aug 1854 by John Rogan in New Plymouth District

From: Inward letters - John Rogan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0540 (40 digitised items). 40 letters written from Awakino, Mokau, New Plymouth, Takatuhi, Whangaroa, Waingohu, Tokatoka (Kaipara), Whakaturai, Auckland, Coromandel, & Sydney (Sep 1858)

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

opposition of Taonui and some of his party.

We have been quiet here since the Puketapu affair. The natives have given over work. The survey operations are suspended, and we have no idea when they are likely to resume. There are unpleasant rumours, as you may imagine constantly; and it is difficult to say that even our neutral policy can keep us clear. Even the natives say that we will be drawn into the quarrel. The Moturoa, Waiwakaiho, and Hua natives, may be found quietly making cartridges, and preparing for a day which they say will come. When the steamer returned from Auckland the natives were most anxious to know if the troops were on board; as they quite anticipated that the Government will send some, now that blood has been spilt. It is difficult to give a correct opinion on this matter. At the same time, I firmly believe if troops are not sent here, (not for the purpose of taking Katatori, or in any way to interfere with the quarrel, as it stands at present, but to act as a check on the future), that the British law in Taranaki will fall for ever in the eyes of the natives; and one of the immediate consequences may be that some of our Friendly natives may turn round upon us, and be our worst enemies; --- especially the Hua people who are, in fact, Puketapus. Who knows Puketapu, they don't know each other. Rawiri was cautious. He said they will never fire at us; we are all relations.

Notwithstanding the apparent gloom that hangs over us just now, the people have been seized with a kind of mania for bush land; and I may say nearly the whole of the land in the Grey and Omata Blocks is sold, without its being surveyed. There is some months' work to survey the land already purchased.

Halse gave out the Hua land on the 17th. Only about 450 acres was taken up by original landowners. Those who have selected, are well pleased, because the land has risen to £5 and £6 an acre. About 350 acres now will be taken up by Scrip, which will satisfy some of the growls.

I have commenced the Mokau and Kawhia plans; which will be forwarded to you before long, if I am not sent out to the Hua again.

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English (ATL)


A survey of Kawhia harbour and the river has been made by a party from the Pandora; a tracing of which would be most useful to me if you think anything is to be effected there in the forthcoming Summer.

Hoping you will excuse this ambling letter, I will conclude by tendering to you my most sincere thanks for your friendship to me; and I assure you it will always be my endeavour to prove myself worthy of the confidence you have reposed in me.

I remain, my dear Sir,
very truly yours, (Signed)
J. Rogan.

P.S. Thursday 24th. August.

The Mail, owing to difficulty in procuring a native, is not yet gone. I send copy of a letter addressed to Cooper by Tiki and Rawiri, of Mokau, on the subject of the Waikato claims to Mokau; which may enlighten you a little. I received a note from Mr. S. stating that Te Kaka called for his present of blanket, etc., the other day; which he considers a good omen. The Mokauites are excessively dark about Rawiri. They are likely to pay us a visit. I mean to write to Takerei by this opportunity, about Poutama.

English (ATL)

Letter from John Rogan to Donald McLean, dated 21st. August 1854

COPY. New Plymouth,
21st, August 1854


My dear Sir,

I send an Official reply to your letter bearing the news of the Governor's approval of my appointment to your Department. You have given me what I wished, as it is the only service I really like to belong to.

I have written to Mr. Schnackenberg, requesting him to enquire quietly, of Takiu and Tikao-kao, about the Ngatihana question. My idea at present is, that the mere right of conquest alone, and of course "utu" for the dead slain at Poutama by the Ngatitamas, will constitute a claim to payment. I know from the Mokau natives themselves that Waikato (as they say) is entitled to something for Poutama; but I think not for the land already sold, because the Ngatitama boundary only reached to Mohakatino, which is out of the land sold; but for this claim of Waikato, old Haimona's offer of Poutama to you through Tikipoto, would be acceded to by the resident natives; of course subject to the opposition of Taonui and some of his party.

We have been quiet here since the Puketapu affair. The natives have given over work. The survey operations are suspended, and we have no idea when they are likely to resume. There are unpleasant rumours, as you may imagine constantly; and it is difficult to say that even our neutral policy can keep us clear. Even the natives say that we will be drawn into the quarrel. The Moturoa, Waiwakaiho, and Hua natives, may be found quietly making cartridges, and preparing for a day which they say will come. When the steamer returned from Auckland the natives were most anxious to know if the troops were on board; as they quite anticipated that the Government will send some, now that blood has been spilt. It is difficult to give a correct opinion on this matter. At the same time, I firmly believe if troops are not sent here, (not for the purpose of taking Katatori, or in any way to interfere with the quarrel, as it stands at present, but to act as a check on the future), that the British law in Taranaki will fall for ever in the eyes of the natives; and one of the immediate consequences may be that some of our Friendly natives may turn round upon us, and be our worst enemies; --- especially the Hua people who are, in fact, Puketapus. Who knows Puketapu, they don't know each other. Rawiri was cautious. He said they will never fire at us; we are all relations.

Notwithstanding the apparent gloom that hangs over us just now, the people have been seized with a kind of mania for bush land; and I may say nearly the whole of the land in the Grey and Omata Blocks is sold, without its being surveyed. There is some months' work to survey the land already purchased.

Halse gave out the Hua land on the 17th. Only about 450 acres was taken up by original landowners. Those who have selected, are well pleased, because the land has risen to £5 and £6 an acre. About 350 acres now will be taken up by Scrip, which will satisfy some of the growls.

I have commenced the Mokau and Kawhia plans; which will be forwarded to you before long, if I am not sent out to the Hua again.

A survey of Kawhia harbour and the river has been made by a party from the Pandora; a tracing of which would be most useful to me if you think anything is to be effected there in the forthcoming Summer.

Hoping you will excuse this ambling letter, I will conclude by tendering to you my most sincere thanks for your friendship to me; and I assure you it will always be my endeavour to prove myself worthy of the confidence you have reposed in me.

I remain, my dear Sir,
very truly yours, (Signed)
J. Rogan.

P.S. Thursday 24th. August.

The Mail, owing to difficulty in procuring a native, is not yet gone. I send copy of a letter addressed to Cooper by Tiki and Rawiri, of Mokau, on the subject of the Waikato claims to Mokau; which may enlighten you a little. I received a note from Mr. S. stating that Te Kaka called for his present of blanket, etc., the other day; which he considers a good omen. The Mokauites are excessively dark about Rawiri. They are likely to pay us a visit. I mean to write to Takerei by this opportunity, about Poutama.

Part of:
Inward letters - John Rogan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0540 (40 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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