Object #1001971 from MS-Papers-0032-0215

3 pages written 22 Aug 1846 by Sir Donald McLean in Taranaki Region to George Clarke

From: Inward letters - George Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0215 (29 digitised items). 28 letters written from Auckland and Bay of Islands, 1844-1874. Piece-level inventory in folder (list excludes letters accessioned in 1969)

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Taranaki
- August 22nd - 1846


My dear Sir,

I should not have so long passed over unnoticed the kind treatment I received from you whilst in the Protectorate, if I had previous opportunity like the present of forwarding a letter to the Waimate, where I hear you and your family have removed and hope you have by this time got comfortably settled at your old place where I am sure you must find some relief in being removed from the anxiety and care attending your late duties.

I duly received your letter apprising me of the close of the dept. in March last unaccompanied by a private letter from yourself which you so kindly almost always sent me but no doubt at the time you were fully engaged with various matters of greater importance

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English (ATL)

that I could not indeed have expected one. Notwithstanding the abolition of the dept. I still continued my duties and prepared a long report of my Taupo Journey for you which I on finding you had gone to the Bay directed to the Col. Secretary Dr. Sinclair.

A month had not fully elapsed when the Governor offered me the appointment of Inspector of Police for this district, which tho it was a change of name and duty has never been felt by the natives as such on whose behalf I engaged men in the forec that would not be inimical to them but whose assistance I find is of the greatest advantage in securing their interests and rights as well as beneficial in preventing the pilfering amongst the settlers to which some of them are addicted.

We had a visit from Te Roto and some of Taonuis people along with them they all behaved well during their stay of a fortnight their object was a friendly visit to this tribe. Excepting a few of the Wanganui natives the tribes of the west coast have been passive during the disturbances at the south.

You will scarcely have heard at the Bay before this reaches you that Rauparaha and five of his followers was captured at Porirua for proffering 30 stand of arms and other assistance to Old Rangi - he at present remains prisoner on board the Calliope.

An attack on the Hutt natives was contemplated the beginning of this month the result is not yet known here.

This little settlement is quietly progressing and the industry of our settlers is by the advanced price of wheat. the greatest want is that of labour as most of

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English (ATL)

those who emigrated as farm labourers 4 years past are now independent small settlers. I hope my young friend Mr. Henry is improving he is a great favorite of mine and I shall be always happy to hear of his welfare, it is probable I may see Mr. George here with the Governor when he visits Taranaki if so I hope that he or any of your family that visit here may always consider my house there home whilst staying here, I have for some now occupied poor Campbells cottage or the one intended for him which is tolerably comfortable.

I had intended to forward somea/cs for Stationery with which I always supplied myself but hearing you had left I thought it was no use doing so. Not hearing from Hughes the grocer I presume you paid him £5 on my a/c if so when you let me I will take an early opportunity of forwarding it to you.


General Clarke Esq. J.P. etc. etc. etc. (unfinished)

English (ATL)

Taranaki
- August 22nd - 1846


My dear Sir,

I should not have so long passed over unnoticed the kind treatment I received from you whilst in the Protectorate, if I had previous opportunity like the present of forwarding a letter to the Waimate, where I hear you and your family have removed and hope you have by this time got comfortably settled at your old place where I am sure you must find some relief in being removed from the anxiety and care attending your late duties.

I duly received your letter apprising me of the close of the dept. in March last unaccompanied by a private letter from yourself which you so kindly almost always sent me but no doubt at the time you were fully engaged with various matters of greater importance that I could not indeed have expected one. Notwithstanding the abolition of the dept. I still continued my duties and prepared a long report of my Taupo Journey for you which I on finding you had gone to the Bay directed to the Col. Secretary Dr. Sinclair.

A month had not fully elapsed when the Governor offered me the appointment of Inspector of Police for this district, which tho it was a change of name and duty has never been felt by the natives as such on whose behalf I engaged men in the forec that would not be inimical to them but whose assistance I find is of the greatest advantage in securing their interests and rights as well as beneficial in preventing the pilfering amongst the settlers to which some of them are addicted.

We had a visit from Te Roto and some of Taonuis people along with them they all behaved well during their stay of a fortnight their object was a friendly visit to this tribe. Excepting a few of the Wanganui natives the tribes of the west coast have been passive during the disturbances at the south.

You will scarcely have heard at the Bay before this reaches you that Rauparaha and five of his followers was captured at Porirua for proffering 30 stand of arms and other assistance to Old Rangi - he at present remains prisoner on board the Calliope.

An attack on the Hutt natives was contemplated the beginning of this month the result is not yet known here.

This little settlement is quietly progressing and the industry of our settlers is by the advanced price of wheat. the greatest want is that of labour as most of those who emigrated as farm labourers 4 years past are now independent small settlers. I hope my young friend Mr. Henry is improving he is a great favorite of mine and I shall be always happy to hear of his welfare, it is probable I may see Mr. George here with the Governor when he visits Taranaki if so I hope that he or any of your family that visit here may always consider my house there home whilst staying here, I have for some now occupied poor Campbells cottage or the one intended for him which is tolerably comfortable.

I had intended to forward somea/cs for Stationery with which I always supplied myself but hearing you had left I thought it was no use doing so. Not hearing from Hughes the grocer I presume you paid him £5 on my a/c if so when you let me I will take an early opportunity of forwarding it to you.


General Clarke Esq. J.P. etc. etc. etc. (unfinished)

Part of:
Inward letters - George Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0215 (29 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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