Object #1001960 from MS-Papers-0032-0658

3 pages written 23 Apr 1869 by George Tovey Buckland Worgan to Sir Donald McLean in Wellington

From: Inward letters - George B Worgan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0658 (95 digitised items). 93 letters and memos written from Wairoa, Napier and Wanganui, 1864-1873. Includes piece-level inventory of letters accessioned pre-1969.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Private ''Clyde''
April 23rd 69


Dear Sir,

I conclude that you have been kept fully advised of every thing that has transpired here during the last three weeks. I wrote as often as I could find time to do so to Mr. Fannin requesting him to furnish you with any items of importance contained in my letters.

I must not conceal from you that I am extremely disheartened at the apathy and listlessness displayed by the authorities in the face of a great opportunity. I am certain that had anything like vigourous action characterised the movements of the gentlemen whose special business it was to act, that ''Kooti'' must have experienced a fatal reverse in his attack on ''Mohaka''. As late as 8 o'clock on Sunday morning when I myself wrote from ''Mohaka'' to Capt. Spiller and Deighton to render me assistance, there was abundant time and scope for decisive action. Te Kooti's retreat could have been prevented and any zeal on the part of Col. Lambert would have brought his Force from Napier into action by 12 o'clock on Monday. You already know how the matter eventuated - I do not hesitate to assert that we saved the lower Pa at 'Mohaka' from being captured and that nothing but want of support which could have been easily and safely rendered obliged me to retreat from the excellent position I held; you know all this already however and I will not again refer to it altho I feel the matter very bitterly. Instead of the past the future demands

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English (ATL)

attention. We are at present surrounded in every direction by evidences of the , I still hold to my opinion that they will not venture actually to attack the Wairoa - they may visit the coast again fall upon Poverty Bay, or by lurking about, cut up any stragglers from here or on the road. I imagine they are short of powder altho they possessed any amount during their attack on ''Mohaka'' They acquired arms but not ammunition there. Again the destruction of ''Te Warus'' advanced Post at ''Te Kiwi'' has disconcerted them, I look upon the slaying of 'Hori Te Rangi' as of much importance and if of no other value our expedition proved to them that we could not be taken by surprise. Should they attack us, they will infallably destroy the settlement as the Redoubt is of not the slightest protection to it. The 'Tariroa' settlers some of whom have ventured home on the dismissal of the Militia and Volunteers and the assurance given them by the Col. at parting that ''they would be safe, perfectly safe'' are the men who will suffer.

I enclose two letters brought me today for transmission to you. there is great want of unity of feeling amongst the natives who are not unnaturally perhaps in a much unsettled and excited state. I have done all in my power, but I have no support, and begin to feel a weariness of constantly struggling against the indifference and incapacity of those I am forced to look to for assistance. I am unwilling without your consent first obtained to resign the temporary employment I have had, and I ask

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English (ATL)

you to be good enough to advise me in the matter. In many respects my position is and has been all through an unpleasant one and it has now become a comparatively useless one also. I do not care to write my reasons, but they are good ones for saying that many thing here need a change and the sooner the better for the welfare of the District. In purely native matters I would advise that Ihaka Wanga be written to and asked not again to expose himself by taking his people into action but to send a younger leader 'Ihaka kai weke' for instance to place at their head The Rev. Tamihana, his brother ''Hapimana'' ''Toha'' and ''Hamana'' are the men to bring forward. ''Paora te A pata'' may safely be allowed to sink into his place without detriment to anyone ''Hamana'' is cunning and not over trustworthy but useful if looked after I consider 'Tamihana' by far the ablest man amidst the native population and the one likely to be of most service if supported,

My letter is already longer than I intended I therefore asking your attention to the hints I have thrown out as worthy of notice, beg to remain


Dear Sir, Your most obed. Servt.
Geo. B. Worgan
D. McLean Esqre, WELLINGTON

English (ATL)

Private ''Clyde''
April 23rd 69


Dear Sir,

I conclude that you have been kept fully advised of every thing that has transpired here during the last three weeks. I wrote as often as I could find time to do so to Mr. Fannin requesting him to furnish you with any items of importance contained in my letters.

I must not conceal from you that I am extremely disheartened at the apathy and listlessness displayed by the authorities in the face of a great opportunity. I am certain that had anything like vigourous action characterised the movements of the gentlemen whose special business it was to act, that ''Kooti'' must have experienced a fatal reverse in his attack on ''Mohaka''. As late as 8 o'clock on Sunday morning when I myself wrote from ''Mohaka'' to Capt. Spiller and Deighton to render me assistance, there was abundant time and scope for decisive action. Te Kooti's retreat could have been prevented and any zeal on the part of Col. Lambert would have brought his Force from Napier into action by 12 o'clock on Monday. You already know how the matter eventuated - I do not hesitate to assert that we saved the lower Pa at 'Mohaka' from being captured and that nothing but want of support which could have been easily and safely rendered obliged me to retreat from the excellent position I held; you know all this already however and I will not again refer to it altho I feel the matter very bitterly. Instead of the past the future demands attention. We are at present surrounded in every direction by evidences of the , I still hold to my opinion that they will not venture actually to attack the Wairoa - they may visit the coast again fall upon Poverty Bay, or by lurking about, cut up any stragglers from here or on the road. I imagine they are short of powder altho they possessed any amount during their attack on ''Mohaka'' They acquired arms but not ammunition there. Again the destruction of ''Te Warus'' advanced Post at ''Te Kiwi'' has disconcerted them, I look upon the slaying of 'Hori Te Rangi' as of much importance and if of no other value our expedition proved to them that we could not be taken by surprise. Should they attack us, they will infallably destroy the settlement as the Redoubt is of not the slightest protection to it. The 'Tariroa' settlers some of whom have ventured home on the dismissal of the Militia and Volunteers and the assurance given them by the Col. at parting that ''they would be safe, perfectly safe'' are the men who will suffer.

I enclose two letters brought me today for transmission to you. there is great want of unity of feeling amongst the natives who are not unnaturally perhaps in a much unsettled and excited state. I have done all in my power, but I have no support, and begin to feel a weariness of constantly struggling against the indifference and incapacity of those I am forced to look to for assistance. I am unwilling without your consent first obtained to resign the temporary employment I have had, and I ask you to be good enough to advise me in the matter. In many respects my position is and has been all through an unpleasant one and it has now become a comparatively useless one also. I do not care to write my reasons, but they are good ones for saying that many thing here need a change and the sooner the better for the welfare of the District. In purely native matters I would advise that Ihaka Wanga be written to and asked not again to expose himself by taking his people into action but to send a younger leader 'Ihaka kai weke' for instance to place at their head The Rev. Tamihana, his brother ''Hapimana'' ''Toha'' and ''Hamana'' are the men to bring forward. ''Paora te A pata'' may safely be allowed to sink into his place without detriment to anyone ''Hamana'' is cunning and not over trustworthy but useful if looked after I consider 'Tamihana' by far the ablest man amidst the native population and the one likely to be of most service if supported,

My letter is already longer than I intended I therefore asking your attention to the hints I have thrown out as worthy of notice, beg to remain


Dear Sir, Your most obed. Servt.
Geo. B. Worgan
D. McLean Esqre, WELLINGTON

Part of:
Inward letters - George B Worgan, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0658 (95 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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