Object #1001746 from MS-Papers-0032-0013

4 pages written 2 Feb 1861 by Sir Donald McLean in Auckland Region

From: Secretary, Native Department - War in Taranaki and Waikato and King Movement, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0013 (26 digitised items). Includes lists of Maori killed at Mahoetahi 6 November 1860 and includes letters signed by Maori such as Tawhiao but penned in McLean's hand or by other government officials.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 4. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Auckland

2 Feby., 1861



My dear General,

I most heartily congratulate you on the signal success which has attended your operations.

The Natives up here feel much subdued by the reverse sustained in the attack on No.3 redoubt, and with all their pride they now freely admit the skill and bravery of the English soldiers and begin to feel that a contest with them is quite a forlorn hope. A Chief came in yesterday to propose that the Waikatos should withdraw from the scene of action, how far they

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English (ATL)

will generally accede to this proposal is uncertain but the return of 250 of them is good evidence that they are getting tired of the struggle. It is much to be regretted that such a fine race should be so infatuated as to hope that they can set up an independent nationality.

The humane course pursued towards prisoners gives them a much higher estimate of English forbearance and generosity than they previously entertained, and the war which the Waikatos have so foolishly aggravated and brought to its present dimensions will not be without its good influence and appreciation of the civilized mode in which it is conducted I only wish you had the mortars and a sufficient force to punish the Southern rebels simultaneously

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English (ATL)

with those you are now reducing to subjection.

Notwithstanding various contradictory opinions about the policy of the war as regards Wm. King and the home govt. is resolved to resist inflexibly the assumption of any authority antagonistic to English rule. The English press with the exception of the Saturday review advocates the Govt. view of the question -- I am aware that you receive many exaggerated reports at different times from various quarters as to the intentions of the Natives they are however as far as I am concerned merely forwarded to you for information out of which something may be gathered as to the views and intentions of the insurgents. It is

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English (ATL)

frequently the case in warfare particularly with uncivilized races that much is said and threatened that never takes place, still I consider that a person in your responsible position should be furnished with every information bearing upon the war, even if it should afterwards turn out to be of no consequence.

In
McLean's
handwriting.

English (ATL)

Auckland

2 Feby., 1861



My dear General,

I most heartily congratulate you on the signal success which has attended your operations.

The Natives up here feel much subdued by the reverse sustained in the attack on No.3 redoubt, and with all their pride they now freely admit the skill and bravery of the English soldiers and begin to feel that a contest with them is quite a forlorn hope. A Chief came in yesterday to propose that the Waikatos should withdraw from the scene of action, how far they will generally accede to this proposal is uncertain but the return of 250 of them is good evidence that they are getting tired of the struggle. It is much to be regretted that such a fine race should be so infatuated as to hope that they can set up an independent nationality.

The humane course pursued towards prisoners gives them a much higher estimate of English forbearance and generosity than they previously entertained, and the war which the Waikatos have so foolishly aggravated and brought to its present dimensions will not be without its good influence and appreciation of the civilized mode in which it is conducted I only wish you had the mortars and a sufficient force to punish the Southern rebels simultaneously with those you are now reducing to subjection.

Notwithstanding various contradictory opinions about the policy of the war as regards Wm. King and the home govt. is resolved to resist inflexibly the assumption of any authority antagonistic to English rule. The English press with the exception of the Saturday review advocates the Govt. view of the question -- I am aware that you receive many exaggerated reports at different times from various quarters as to the intentions of the Natives they are however as far as I am concerned merely forwarded to you for information out of which something may be gathered as to the views and intentions of the insurgents. It is frequently the case in warfare particularly with uncivilized races that much is said and threatened that never takes place, still I consider that a person in your responsible position should be furnished with every information bearing upon the war, even if it should afterwards turn out to be of no consequence.

In
McLean's
handwriting.

Part of:
Secretary, Native Department - War in Taranaki and Waikato and King Movement, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0013 (26 digitised items)
Series 7 Official papers, Reference Number Series 7 Official papers (3737 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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