Object #1001278 from MS-Papers-0032-0279

3 pages written 29 Apr 1870 by Sir William Fox in Dunedin City to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Sir William Fox, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0279 (45 digitised items). 43 letters written by Fox from Wellington, Wanganui, Auckland, Grahamstown, Rangitikei, Marton, Dunedin, 1870-1871. Includes letter from Charles J Taylor to Fox, Feb 1870; Fox to Mete Kingi, 1870; incomplete letter to Fox (written from Patea, Mar 1870); Fox to Gisborne, Apr 1870; Fox to Gisborne (copy), May 1871; J Booth to Fox, Wanganui (copy), Apr 1871; McLean to Fox, 1871; Albert J Allen [?] to Fox, Aug 1871.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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Page 1 of 3. View high-resolution image

English (ATL)

Dunedin

29th Ap. 1870



My dear McLean,

I suppose you have seen my notes to Gisborne and Vogel. I have written less to you because you were out of postal routes and I hardly knew where to find you. I think I may well congratulate you on the success of our operations in the Uriwera country. Indeed so complete do I regard them that I have not hesitated to express my opinion publicly that the war is over, and that we shall see no more fighting in the N. Island. Kooti and all his clan seem utterly broken up and I think even if Ropata fails to catch him, he will give us no more trouble. It is a curious thing in N Z wars

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English (ATL)

that we have never caught the big Rebel, whether Hone Heke, Wm. King,Topini, Titiko, or whoever it might be, but the wars in each case have subsided and left the leader in the background. Except Kooti, who is there that we are likely to quarrell with? and if he is really done, all our trouble is over. Of course there are years' work in the way of administration road making, etc. which will demand all your time and knowledge, but the present disturbance is really over I do not anticipate ever seeing another.

I have seen Tatiroa and the Pakakoes. They are all in first rate health, and usefully employed and have nothing to complain of. I hear from Buller that our Wanganui allies are going to ask or have asked for their liberation. If this is so, it may be made the lever for settling all land questions on West Coast. I would have no objection to their returning to Wanganui river if the natives there would be bail for them and give them land (there number is small) in return for their surrendering all rights tribal, individual and by way of Reserve in the district from Wanganui to Waingongoro. I beleive they can easily be induced to do this and would jump at it as the price of their liberation.

The Waitotara rumpus you would see assumed very alarming proportions; but I think has now entirely subsided. It makes it quite clear to me that the Natives must be kept out of the District if our restoration plans are to succeed and collisions to be avoided. No doubt

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English (ATL)

Gisborne has given you my Memdm. on the subject. The Taupo meeting will I suppose come off before I return; but I hope you will be able at it to ventilate our wishes in regard to the West Coast, and that the Pakakoes may be a useful lever to that end.

I am just starting for a trip to Oamaru. I have had a most friendly reception here from all classes, and addressed a meeting of 1500 on the War and Expenditure of which I sent you a report. The O. Daily has been poisoned by Whitmore and Co. but I think I have neutralized its mischief for the future. Mair reckons we have a working majority of 12 without the lane, which is likely to be with us too. I am sorry to say the S. Francisco contract is universally unpopular here, and if we have a split it will probably be abt. it.


Yours faithfully,
Wm. Fox.

English (ATL)

Dunedin

29th Ap. 1870



My dear McLean,

I suppose you have seen my notes to Gisborne and Vogel. I have written less to you because you were out of postal routes and I hardly knew where to find you. I think I may well congratulate you on the success of our operations in the Uriwera country. Indeed so complete do I regard them that I have not hesitated to express my opinion publicly that the war is over, and that we shall see no more fighting in the N. Island. Kooti and all his clan seem utterly broken up and I think even if Ropata fails to catch him, he will give us no more trouble. It is a curious thing in N Z wars that we have never caught the big Rebel, whether Hone Heke, Wm. King,Topini, Titiko, or whoever it might be, but the wars in each case have subsided and left the leader in the background. Except Kooti, who is there that we are likely to quarrell with? and if he is really done, all our trouble is over. Of course there are years' work in the way of administration road making, etc. which will demand all your time and knowledge, but the present disturbance is really over I do not anticipate ever seeing another.

I have seen Tatiroa and the Pakakoes. They are all in first rate health, and usefully employed and have nothing to complain of. I hear from Buller that our Wanganui allies are going to ask or have asked for their liberation. If this is so, it may be made the lever for settling all land questions on West Coast. I would have no objection to their returning to Wanganui river if the natives there would be bail for them and give them land (there number is small) in return for their surrendering all rights tribal, individual and by way of Reserve in the district from Wanganui to Waingongoro. I beleive they can easily be induced to do this and would jump at it as the price of their liberation.

The Waitotara rumpus you would see assumed very alarming proportions; but I think has now entirely subsided. It makes it quite clear to me that the Natives must be kept out of the District if our restoration plans are to succeed and collisions to be avoided. No doubt Gisborne has given you my Memdm. on the subject. The Taupo meeting will I suppose come off before I return; but I hope you will be able at it to ventilate our wishes in regard to the West Coast, and that the Pakakoes may be a useful lever to that end.

I am just starting for a trip to Oamaru. I have had a most friendly reception here from all classes, and addressed a meeting of 1500 on the War and Expenditure of which I sent you a report. The O. Daily has been poisoned by Whitmore and Co. but I think I have neutralized its mischief for the future. Mair reckons we have a working majority of 12 without the lane, which is likely to be with us too. I am sorry to say the S. Francisco contract is universally unpopular here, and if we have a split it will probably be abt. it.


Yours faithfully,
Wm. Fox.

Part of:
Inward letters - Sir William Fox, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0279 (45 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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