Object #1001272 from MS-Papers-0032-0217

3 pages written 13 Mar 1861 by Henry Tacy Clarke in Tauranga to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward letters - Henry Tacy Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0217 (61 digitised items). 59 letters written from Tauranga, Maketu, Auckland & Waimate, 1861-1870. Includes letter to Hare Reweti (Charles Davis) from Manuhiri with explanatory note on verso from Louis Hetet, 1870.

A transcription/translation of this document (by ATL) appears below.

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English (ATL)

Tauranga

March 13th 1861



My dear Sir,

The Tauranga natives are quiet, but it is a quietness I do not exactly understand - Whether it arises from the hopelessness of the Taranaki war, and disappointed national ambition or from a real desire to remain aloof from the present quarrel I cannot say. I do not hear any extravagant rumours of Maori success at Taranaki now Natives here who are in communication with some of the Taranaki people acknowledge that they ''hina'' some of their losses I believe them to have been heavy I hear sometimes ''Ngarangatira o Waikato ka poto nei i te pakeha''.

The Waikato natives are in almost daily communication with Tauranga. Parties of three four and five are constantly coming over - I believe that the ''Kereti'' has been the greatest attraction. The European traders tell me the great cry is powder and gun caps.

The Tauranga natives are greatly disappointed with the result of the ''Keretis expedition to Auckland they blame every one but the right. They believe that some one in Tauranga has revealed the whole scheme

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English (ATL)

to the Government. M - t the pakeha has told them that their plans have all failed, that the Government are keeping a careful watch of them and their proceedings. I hope and trust the Government will be careful how they trust to the statements of such Europeans as M - t he can do the Government no good, and will do, I fear has done a great deal of harm. I have discovered that many of his statements are false - many accidental circumstances he has woven into a plausible story for the purpose of giving his information a mysterious importance. For instance, the signal fires referred to in his statement I remembered the circumstance, and remarking to my brother, how like signal fires they were. I visited the place last week and had the curiosity to look about and see whether I could discover their whereabouts - I did so - and believe their to be nothing more than fires kindled to burn straw after thrashing - a universal practice here. The stillness of evening was chosen to prevent accident.

I have had a visit an hour ago from Hohepa Wharerahi, Taupo Chief, he confirms the report I stated in my letter of yesterdays date. The Taupo natives will not take part with Waikato in the Taranaki war. He has

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English (ATL)

invited me to go to Taupo to visit them I promised to do so, I believe many of them are changing sides. This man Hohepa was a ''Kingi'' but he says they can not get on, there own Runanga impose upon them and the whole system out-of-joint.

I have written a public letter asking to be allowed a sum of money to procure a boat and to assist in building a Court House - I hope you will do all you can to further this. That it is quite necessary I am sure, or I certainly would not bring it under the Governor's notice. A great deal of my knocking about amongst the natives depends upon it. It is no use telling the natives that they must come to me. To do them any good, one must go about amongst them, giving to ones opponents a good share of attention, without causing offence to friends. I cannot do it out of my own funds. I am at a great expence already in finding food for natives who come from a distance and keeping a crew to pull me about foom place to place, and I do not wish to pus my friends to any further inconvenience.

The natives at Opotiki are about to hold a large political meeting. I shall be there if all is well - I do not like so many of these meetings, it betrays symptoms of uneasiness. The Ngaeterangi are receiving many visitors, the objects peaceable I think.


Yours very truly,
Hy.T.Clarke.

English (ATL)

Tauranga

March 13th 1861



My dear Sir,

The Tauranga natives are quiet, but it is a quietness I do not exactly understand - Whether it arises from the hopelessness of the Taranaki war, and disappointed national ambition or from a real desire to remain aloof from the present quarrel I cannot say. I do not hear any extravagant rumours of Maori success at Taranaki now Natives here who are in communication with some of the Taranaki people acknowledge that they ''hina'' some of their losses I believe them to have been heavy I hear sometimes ''Ngarangatira o Waikato ka poto nei i te pakeha''.

The Waikato natives are in almost daily communication with Tauranga. Parties of three four and five are constantly coming over - I believe that the ''Kereti'' has been the greatest attraction. The European traders tell me the great cry is powder and gun caps.

The Tauranga natives are greatly disappointed with the result of the ''Keretis expedition to Auckland they blame every one but the right. They believe that some one in Tauranga has revealed the whole scheme to the Government. M - t the pakeha has told them that their plans have all failed, that the Government are keeping a careful watch of them and their proceedings. I hope and trust the Government will be careful how they trust to the statements of such Europeans as M - t he can do the Government no good, and will do, I fear has done a great deal of harm. I have discovered that many of his statements are false - many accidental circumstances he has woven into a plausible story for the purpose of giving his information a mysterious importance. For instance, the signal fires referred to in his statement I remembered the circumstance, and remarking to my brother, how like signal fires they were. I visited the place last week and had the curiosity to look about and see whether I could discover their whereabouts - I did so - and believe their to be nothing more than fires kindled to burn straw after thrashing - a universal practice here. The stillness of evening was chosen to prevent accident.

I have had a visit an hour ago from Hohepa Wharerahi, Taupo Chief, he confirms the report I stated in my letter of yesterdays date. The Taupo natives will not take part with Waikato in the Taranaki war. He has invited me to go to Taupo to visit them I promised to do so, I believe many of them are changing sides. This man Hohepa was a ''Kingi'' but he says they can not get on, there own Runanga impose upon them and the whole system out-of-joint.

I have written a public letter asking to be allowed a sum of money to procure a boat and to assist in building a Court House - I hope you will do all you can to further this. That it is quite necessary I am sure, or I certainly would not bring it under the Governor's notice. A great deal of my knocking about amongst the natives depends upon it. It is no use telling the natives that they must come to me. To do them any good, one must go about amongst them, giving to ones opponents a good share of attention, without causing offence to friends. I cannot do it out of my own funds. I am at a great expence already in finding food for natives who come from a distance and keeping a crew to pull me about foom place to place, and I do not wish to pus my friends to any further inconvenience.

The natives at Opotiki are about to hold a large political meeting. I shall be there if all is well - I do not like so many of these meetings, it betrays symptoms of uneasiness. The Ngaeterangi are receiving many visitors, the objects peaceable I think.


Yours very truly,
Hy.T.Clarke.

Part of:
Inward letters - Henry Tacy Clarke, Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0217 (61 digitised items)
Series 1 Inward letters (English), Reference Number Series 1 Inward letters (English) (14501 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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