Object #1001142 from MS-Papers-0032-0828

5 pages written 1852 by Susan Douglas McLean in Wellington to Sir Donald McLean

From: Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0828 (82 digitised items). The letters from Donald are written from Porirua Barracks, Otaki, Rangitikei, Waikanae, Wanganui and Taranaki. Susan's letters are addressed from Dalmuir Hill (her parent's home) and Wellington Terrace. Many letters are undated and were written prior to their marriage in Aug 1851. Includes correspondence between Susan McLean and her mother Susan Strang (2 letters, undated); one letter from Helen Anne Wilson to Mrs McLean, 30 August 1852

A transcription/translation of this document (by MD) appears below.

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Page 1 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
Thursday evening [1852]


My dearest Donald

I was very sorry that I could not write you a few lines last night as usual. Mrs Kelham and Mrs Hickson dined with us and when they left I felt so fatigued and unwell that I could not write. I had been very unwell all day so much so that Jessie insisted on sending for Mrs Rhatigan. I began myself to be frightened I was in so much pain. It was so bad at times that I could scarcely sit up. When Mrs McKenzie came she set my mind at ease by telling me that the pain was only caused by some cold I had caught. She made me take some warm negus which did me some good. It however continued and all the evening more or less but today it is quite

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English (MD)

gone and I feel very well again. What made me more misery yesterday was Dr Featherstone being away. He told me when he called that if I felt ill I must send for Dr Dorset but that would be most disagreeable. I tell you all this because I know that you are sure to find it out either through second sight or some other means you have got of finding out all that happens to your pussy in your absence. Another week has passed since you left me. What a weary fortnight darling it has been to me. I am so longing for tomorrow to come for I trust to hear by the mail. The only happiness I have when you are away is receiving a letter from you. How much I wish my darling this wandering life was over and we were settled quietly somewhere. I would not care where if I only had my dear husband

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English (MD)

with me. I shall conclude for tonight for I have my book to write yet. By the bye the painters are out at last. Is it not a comfort to get rid of them. The bedroom will be put in order tomorrow. I am so glad that my Donald will at last get some comfort when he comes home. Good night dearest love.

Friday night
I received your letter dearest Donald this afternoon. I cannot tell you how much I wished the day to pass. I looked forward so anxiously to Papa's return home and now tonight since I have heard from my dear husband I am quite happy. I was to delighted to hear that you did not think it likely you would go on to Whanganui as I shall have you home sooner than I expected. I was sure my darling would not be long away from his pussy. Is it not hard that I cannot go about with you always. Before our marriage I often thought how

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English (MD)

happy I would be to travel about with you but it is no use to fret that I cannot do it. I am still in hopes that if I am spared I may be able next summer to accompany you.

Papa wishes me to go to the Taita tomorrow and he has engaged Wilhelm's gig. Miss Hart is to accompany me. I suppose pet you will have no objections to my going. I will take great care of myself. I feel quite well again. I think I know now the cause of my illness. I shall tell you when you come home. I don't think I need fear return of it. Mrs Hargreaves has been spending the day with me. I was on my way this morning to see her and I met her coming up to see me. Her aunt had gone up last night and told her that I had been very ill the day before. Adam McDonald came up this morning to ask Papa what he had to do about his marriage. The wedding is to take

Page 5 of 5. View high-resolution image

English (MD)

place on the 10th of next month. Mary Paul is coming on Monday. I daresay either she or Ellen will stay with me till you return I am in hopes that I may see my darling by the end of next week. I must now bid my dear husband goodbye. I shall not likely be able to write tomorrow at the Taita so I do not think I shall be able to add more to this letter. God bless you my own dearest husband


Ever your affectionate wife
Susan D McLean

[Note on transcription: negus is a hot drink of port, sugar, lemon and spice]

English (MD)

Dalmuir Hill
Thursday evening [1852]


My dearest Donald

I was very sorry that I could not write you a few lines last night as usual. Mrs Kelham and Mrs Hickson dined with us and when they left I felt so fatigued and unwell that I could not write. I had been very unwell all day so much so that Jessie insisted on sending for Mrs Rhatigan. I began myself to be frightened I was in so much pain. It was so bad at times that I could scarcely sit up. When Mrs McKenzie came she set my mind at ease by telling me that the pain was only caused by some cold I had caught. She made me take some warm negus which did me some good. It however continued and all the evening more or less but today it is quite gone and I feel very well again. What made me more misery yesterday was Dr Featherstone being away. He told me when he called that if I felt ill I must send for Dr Dorset but that would be most disagreeable. I tell you all this because I know that you are sure to find it out either through second sight or some other means you have got of finding out all that happens to your pussy in your absence. Another week has passed since you left me. What a weary fortnight darling it has been to me. I am so longing for tomorrow to come for I trust to hear by the mail. The only happiness I have when you are away is receiving a letter from you. How much I wish my darling this wandering life was over and we were settled quietly somewhere. I would not care where if I only had my dear husband with me. I shall conclude for tonight for I have my book to write yet. By the bye the painters are out at last. Is it not a comfort to get rid of them. The bedroom will be put in order tomorrow. I am so glad that my Donald will at last get some comfort when he comes home. Good night dearest love.

Friday night
I received your letter dearest Donald this afternoon. I cannot tell you how much I wished the day to pass. I looked forward so anxiously to Papa's return home and now tonight since I have heard from my dear husband I am quite happy. I was to delighted to hear that you did not think it likely you would go on to Whanganui as I shall have you home sooner than I expected. I was sure my darling would not be long away from his pussy. Is it not hard that I cannot go about with you always. Before our marriage I often thought how happy I would be to travel about with you but it is no use to fret that I cannot do it. I am still in hopes that if I am spared I may be able next summer to accompany you.

Papa wishes me to go to the Taita tomorrow and he has engaged Wilhelm's gig. Miss Hart is to accompany me. I suppose pet you will have no objections to my going. I will take great care of myself. I feel quite well again. I think I know now the cause of my illness. I shall tell you when you come home. I don't think I need fear return of it. Mrs Hargreaves has been spending the day with me. I was on my way this morning to see her and I met her coming up to see me. Her aunt had gone up last night and told her that I had been very ill the day before. Adam McDonald came up this morning to ask Papa what he had to do about his marriage. The wedding is to take place on the 10th of next month. Mary Paul is coming on Monday. I daresay either she or Ellen will stay with me till you return I am in hopes that I may see my darling by the end of next week. I must now bid my dear husband goodbye. I shall not likely be able to write tomorrow at the Taita so I do not think I shall be able to add more to this letter. God bless you my own dearest husband


Ever your affectionate wife
Susan D McLean

[Note on transcription: negus is a hot drink of port, sugar, lemon and spice]

Part of:
Inward family correspondence - Susan McLean (wife), Reference Number MS-Papers-0032-0828 (82 digitised items)
Series 9 Inwards family letters, Reference Number Series 9 Inwards family letters (1204 digitised items)
McLean Papers, Reference Number MS-Group-1551 (30238 digitised items)

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